Definition of objection in English:

objection

noun

  • 1An expression or feeling of disapproval or opposition; a reason for disagreeing.

    ‘they have raised no objections to the latest plans’
    • ‘It will allow residents to seek a review of licences at any time and raise objections when they are applied for.’
    • ‘An inquiry is pending on one refusal and the deadline for objections to the recent application is today.’
    • ‘I review and present my objections to every planning application on this site.’
    • ‘This has now been put right and residents will have the opportunity to raise objections if they wish.’
    • ‘In the review he raised some objections and also claimed that he had been the first to prove some of the results.’
    • ‘If you have any further objections or points to raise, please feel free to comment.’
    • ‘They unanimously approved the project despite strong objections from some patients.’
    • ‘The Highways Authority has not raised any objections to the principle of the access road.’
    • ‘It is the second time the plans have raised objections from the town council.’
    • ‘He explained that applying for a new licence gave greater scope for objections to be raised.’
    • ‘Why do they think so many people raised objections to the invasion in the first place?’
    • ‘It led to the highest number of objections ever received by Ilkley planners to a single application.’
    • ‘Could some expense be spared had the council taken account of what local concerns and objections are?’
    • ‘However, objections have been raised by canoeists who fear their sport may suffer.’
    • ‘The shop used to be a newsagent and the move sparked objections from residents, who got up a petition to fight it.’
    • ‘Traffic is a common theme of the concerns expressed in the objections to the quarry.’
    • ‘There have been a number of objections so far and it remains to be seen how the issue will be resolved.’
    • ‘They said that the President either had already signed it or was about to when objections were raised in Congress.’
    • ‘The firm says it has been surprised by the amount of objections raised by planning officers.’
    • ‘Apparently, the administration knew about the trip and raised no objections.’
    protest, protestation, demur, demurrer, remonstrance, remonstration, exception, complaint, grievance, moan, grumble, grouse, cavil, quibble, expostulation
    opposition, argument, counter-argument, demurral, disapproval, dissent, disagreement
    niggle, gripe, beef, grouch
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The action of challenging or disagreeing with something.
      ‘his view is open to objection’
      • ‘At the very least McConnell needs a convincing answer to this objection before his plan goes further.’
      • ‘A more serious objection is that he was doing the prime minister's bidding.’
      • ‘To my editorial consternation, he has no objection to being seen as didactic in his novels.’
      • ‘There were 14 letters of support for the scheme and eight letters of objection.’
      • ‘All of the explanations are open to serious objection: it may well be that none of them is correct.’
      • ‘I've looked at your site, and I have no objection to the excerpt from my essay that is presented there.’
      • ‘This is an ingenious and illuminating argument, but it is open to serious objection.’
      • ‘Yesterday it emerged that Swindon Council has agreed to the application without objection.’
      • ‘Letters of objection were received from two neighbours who said two houses would be over development.’
      • ‘Normally the town council planning committee states that it either objects to or has no objection to plans.’
      • ‘It also agreed with the council's objection to selecting children based on computing ability.’
      • ‘Whilst we have no objection to competition, this one-sided battle is madness.’
      • ‘The application is open to objection and is likely that the whole process will take many months.’
      • ‘The current planning system does not appear to have any mechanism for negotiation only for objection.’
      • ‘A spokesman at the council has said it has already received 37 letters of objection to the plans.’
      • ‘It was opposed by Frinton and Walton Town Council and two neighbours also sent in letters of objection.’
      • ‘This position, even if internally consistent, would seem to be open to grave objection.’
      • ‘Now local people are mounting a campaign of objection in what could be the first test of the village design statement.’
      • ‘He cannot take what he says to have the respectable standing of real criticism or real objection.’
      • ‘He said one objection carried the same weight as objections from a large number of people.’
      protest, protestation, remonstrance, statement of dissatisfaction, grievance, charge, accusation, criticism
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, or from late Latin objectio(n-), from the verb obicere (see object).

Pronunciation:

objection

/əbˈjekSH(ə)n/