Definition of object in English:

object

noun

Pronunciation /ˈɑbdʒɛkt//ˈäbjekt/
  • 1A material thing that can be seen and touched.

    ‘he was dragging a large object’
    ‘small objects such as shells’
    • ‘The works I've described thus far had one thing in common - they were discreet objects made with durable materials.’
    • ‘The photogram technique uses only light, an object and light-sensitive materials, such as ice, water and glass.’
    • ‘Women's status in the law was reduced to that of material objects and possessions.’
    • ‘The group's knowledge of everyday objects and materials will then be tested through a quiz and the children will discover how fragments of history can help us build up a picture of the past.’
    • ‘Found objects and pre-existing printed material are the inspirations for the Glasgow-trained painter.’
    • ‘Is it the result of the consumerist culture that has gripped us, or the need to possess material objects in order to reassure ourselves of our own worth?’
    • ‘In several others, Qi Gong masters engage in feats such as moving objects and people without touching them.’
    • ‘The community traded with the world, and designed and manufactured to sell into that market, including very ornate objects and fancy materials.’
    • ‘In the language center, for instance, toddlers learn vocabulary by touching and feeling available objects as they practice the names of the items and the sound of the letter.’
    • ‘And while Bob might not be able to touch objects, he can touch people, and soon becomes a part of the family.’
    • ‘My scooter is still very much a material object: it eats petrol, needs its tires filled and refuses to start on cold mornings.’
    • ‘Scarcity seems equally intractable at first - the Internet is certainly not going to eliminate shortages of material objects or time or ability.’
    • ‘Do you think we get too attached to material objects?’
    • ‘If I was touching objects in the airport, I was very careful to wash my hands with alcohol.’
    • ‘Just as in art everything depends on a limited but skillful use of color and sounds, so too the art of living demands a limited but skillful use of material objects.’
    • ‘Don't touch metallic objects like ice axes, crampons, tent poles, or jewelry.’
    • ‘Regardless of religion and ethnic background the majority of us in the Western world have been permanently imprinted with a lust for purchasing material objects.’
    • ‘The youngsters had to follow clues to find objects made from natural materials around the museum.’
    • ‘It is all a bit sci-fi and cosmic, but somehow the surface never stops reminding you that this is a material object, something made with the hand and the eye and the body's own chemistry.’
    • ‘Visitors to museums disregard cautionary boards and touch objects.’
    thing, article, item, piece, device, gadget, entity, body
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Philosophy A thing external to the thinking mind or subject.
      • ‘Schopenhauer's second class of objects for the mind is made up of concepts.’
      • ‘It is neither an external object nor an inner experience.’
      • ‘This was unsatisfactory because the external object is something foreign or hostile to self-consciousness.’
      • ‘Where Fichte in particular was happy to absorb the object into the subject, Kant preferred inconsistency to such a move.’
      • ‘We do not perceive the external object but only its effects in consciousness.’
  • 2A person or thing to which a specified action or feeling is directed.

    ‘disease became the object of investigation’
    • ‘If the object of a public consultation is to find out what the market thinks, Black's Consulting is on the right track.’
    • ‘For the object of their attention at Beningbrough Hall is described as one of the finest Baroque state beds to survive in England.’
    • ‘But he has links to men who are the object of a federal investigation into a West Coast laboratory.’
    • ‘The object of their attention is not a group of beautiful Bollywood starlets or the latest icon of Hindi pop.’
    • ‘The relationship between environment and organisms became the object of his attention.’
    • ‘The women screamed in unison all eager to be the object of Joe's attention if only for a second, but all too timid to volunteer.’
    • ‘The issues are the object of ongoing investigations.’
    • ‘While the object of his investigation is novel, his conclusions will be familiar to students of nineteenth-century America.’
    • ‘They are the object of public pity for their heroic battles against addiction.’
    • ‘The greater the part played in our lives by the object of our attention the greater the loss.’
    • ‘When I was much younger, I was the object of attention for one thing - my derrière.’
    • ‘Despite being the object of much attention right now, the struggle for control over content probably isn't very meaningful to mass audiences.’
    • ‘My dislike increases to hate when the object of my desire is a pair of work shoes in summer.’
    • ‘The romance became public when the object of her affection, a Swiss named Franco, announced plans to divorce his wife.’
    • ‘But the object of all this attention could not be more unassuming.’
    • ‘It turned out that she'd been the object of so much attention that she had to hide in the girls' room to get a breather.’
    • ‘If you do not declare yourself immediately, you arouse expectation, especially when the importance of your position makes you the object of general attention.’
    • ‘Haunted by accusations made against his father and searching for a buried fortune, he becomes the object of a manhunt organised by a posse of bandits.’
    • ‘She noted that she was the object of attention of a tall, dark-haired figure whose face remained hidden by the flurry of the crowd.’
    • ‘Talk about star-crossed lovers, each invisible to the object of their attention.’
    target, butt, focus, recipient, victim
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A goal or purpose.
      ‘the Institute was opened with the object of promoting scientific study’
      • ‘If one of the parties does so and the other is unaware of the illegal purpose the party whose object is illegal cannot enforce the obligation of the other.’
      • ‘It is contrary to the spirit, purpose and objects of the Act to protect a defaulting owner from having to pay his share by a narrow reading of the language relating to a tool for the collection of what is owing.’
      • ‘The genesis, the objective aim, object and commercial purpose of the transaction and its factual matrix are important as older authorities show.’
      • ‘The board is adopting devices and methods to defeat the very purpose and object of the Bank.’
      • ‘The object and purpose of the Foreshore and Seabed Bill were set out clearly in clause 2A and clause 3.’
      • ‘And, what is the value, the object, the purpose of having those words in the Constitution?’
      • ‘I do not accept that they, or the Lee / Eadie conversation, are admissible as showing the object and purpose of the saving provision.’
      • ‘This decision does illustrate how closely the express and implied powers of specialized agencies must be related to their specific objects and purposes.’
      • ‘In 1899 he founded the magazine World of Art, with the object of interchanging artistic ideas with Western Europe.’
      • ‘That qualification is a test for determining whether there is a legitimate object or purpose of the legislature.’
      • ‘The question is the extent to which the object in nature as goal remains the same.’
      • ‘To reap the benefits of exercise on your sex life, plan more active dates with the object of your affection.’
      • ‘That preliminary record is then published with the object of inviting comments and objections from persons interested either in the subsistence of the right of way or to deny its subsistence.’
      • ‘A new military expedition was launched with the object of proceeding to the second stage of the original plan, now that the first had failed: the Grand Canal was to be cut at Nanjing.’
      • ‘A goal is an object that the eye is focused on for the purpose of attaining it through constant attention and effort.’
      • ‘The text of the Preamble to the Convention is an important source for determining its object and purpose.’
      • ‘The result would hardly prove consistent with the object and purpose of the Statute and its intent to put an end to impunity for the perpetrators of the most serious crimes.’
      • ‘A latitude extending thus far might lead to results incompatible with the object and purpose of the Convention.’
      • ‘In other words, it must be shown that the object or purpose of the defendant is to inflict harm on the claimant, either as an end in itself, or as a means to another end.’
      • ‘It is an object, a goal, a future state of being to be passively wished for and waited upon.’
      purpose, objective, aim, goal, target, end, end in view, plan, object of the exercise
      View synonyms
  • 3Grammar
    A noun or noun phrase governed by an active transitive verb or by a preposition.

    • ‘All languages have something like nouns and verbs, isolating objects, entities, events, and abstractions.’
    • ‘Earlier forerunners rely entirely on intransitive or quasi-transitive verbs, with the object preceded by a preposition.’
    • ‘Using a straight news story, circle all the direct objects in blue, the indirect objects in red, and the objects of prepositions in green.’
    • ‘Verbs can be either transitive or intransitive a transitive verb governs an object, whereas an intransitive verb does not.’
    • ‘Mohawk is a polysynthetic language, in which noun objects can easily be incorporated into the verb.’
  • 4Computing
    A data construct that provides a description of something that may be used by a computer (such as a processor, a peripheral, a document, or a data set) and defines its status, its method of operation, and how it interacts with other objects.

    • ‘This method provides the ServletConfig object for initializing the servlet's parameters.’
    • ‘System and method for distributed conflict resolution between data objects replicated across a computer network’
    • ‘That data is then lost on shutdown, but this is not acceptable a way must be provided for storing objects in secondary storage.’
    • ‘In order to put the Mason components and Perl objects on separate computers, we somehow need the ability to call an object method across a network.’
    • ‘What is new is the scope and scale of the application of rich metadata to a much wider variety of content objects - intranets, extranets and even the Web.’

verb

Pronunciation /əbˈdʒɛkt//əbˈjekt/
  • 1reporting verb Say something to express one's disapproval of or disagreement with something.

    no object ‘residents object to the volume of traffic’
    with clause ‘the boy's father objected that the police had arrested him unlawfully’
    • ‘I object to seeing policemen in uniform holding hands in public - it's not a family way of life and we should support the family more.’
    • ‘The council will then become the licensing authority, but the police will have the same power to object to unsuitable applications.’
    • ‘No child custody issues were implicated whatsoever under the Ninth Circuit ruling, only the father's rights to object to unconstitutional conduct.’
    • ‘What we object to are the attitudes that lurk beneath the surface his writing such as the persistent and recurring notion that contemporary art is guilty until proven innocent.’
    • ‘I wouldn't object to the cameras so much if there was a police presence to crack down on other motoring offences.’
    • ‘Still, he chose not to object to his father, opting for silence instead.’
    • ‘However, in this legislation there is no opportunity for the police to object to the concealment occurring if a person meets the criteria of the Act.’
    • ‘In this particular case the major reason for opposing an increase of a handful of dwellings was to object to a precedent being set.’
    • ‘Only the police may object to conversion, and then only on crime prevention grounds.’
    • ‘Are you talking of the whole article or is the matter complained of simply the paragraph that you object to?’
    • ‘Five people were arrested today after staging an illegal demonstration outside parliament to object to new laws restricting protests in the area.’
    • ‘Those who object to it argue that it misrepresents half the human race and reinforces male bias and social dominance.’
    • ‘He said he would object to being relocated, arguing that he had lived in the area for more than 30 years.’
    • ‘Those who disagree with the practice may object to this definition but I think it is quite accurate.’
    • ‘However, the project has already prompted a barrage of protest from people who object to unsightly turbines on the land.’
    • ‘In the end, Zahra was quite jealous, but only because she had gotten dressed while there was still time for their father to object to some of the outfits she wanted to wear.’
    • ‘Trouble is, like many concerned carnivores, I object to the way most U.S. beef is raised.’
    • ‘I was hoping we might have got a bit more support from local police, but they didn't object to it.’
    • ‘‘If the parents are unhappy about the mast then we will object to it in the strongest possible way and we will help parents with their campaign,’ he said.’
    • ‘With that in mind, I must heartily object to Jane's hypothetical above.’
    protest, protest against, lodge a protest, lodge a protest against, express objections, raise objections, express objections to, raise objections to, express disapproval, express disapproval of, express disagreement, express disagreement with, oppose, be in opposition, be in opposition to, take exception, take exception to, take issue, take issue with, take a stand against, have a problem, have a problem with, argue, argue against, remonstrate, remonstrate against, make a fuss, make a fuss about, quarrel with, disapprove, disapprove of, condemn, draw the line, draw the line at, demur, mind, complain, complain about, moan, moan about, grumble, grumble about, grouse, grouse about, cavil, cavil at, quibble, quibble about
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic with object Adduce as a reason against something.
      ‘Bryant objects this very circumstance to the authenticity of the Iliad’

Phrases

  • no object

    • Not influencing or restricting choices or decisions.

      ‘a tycoon for whom money is no object’
      • ‘It has to have at least six bedrooms and it's fair to say that money is no object.’
      • ‘Granite World cover the entire region with distance no object.’
      • ‘Distance is no object to Magic Maintenance who offer reasonable and competitive rates for the services provided.’
      • ‘A number of councillors have staked their reputations on getting this project done, and in that respect, the cost to the ratepayer is no object.’
      • ‘Price is no object; if it's wonderful, we'll pay whatever you ask.’
      • ‘I don't know if he was in a different town at the time, but even if he was, this is a man to whom the money or means to get to her bedside would have been no object!’
      • ‘I have to say that if money was no object and I had my choice of notebook computers, the T41p would be at the very top of my list.’
      • ‘But the accounts refer to before the English Civil War when he organised journeys for Buckingham and his Royal friends - with expense no object.’
      • ‘With money no object, the 600-acre grounds were no less spectacular, with soil specially imported from the mainland to create a wooded landscape on a virtually treeless island.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from medieval Latin objectum ‘thing presented to the mind’, neuter past participle (used as a noun) of Latin obicere, from ob- ‘in the way of’ + jacere ‘to throw’; the verb may also partly represent the Latin frequentative objectare.

Pronunciation

object

Noun/ˈɑbdʒɛkt/

object

Verb/əbˈdʒɛkt/