Definition of oaf in US English:

oaf

noun

  • A stupid, uncultured, or clumsy person.

    • ‘‘Why don't you, you lazy oaf,’ Ryan hissed right back, his anger flaring up wildly.’
    • ‘Those drunken oafs do not deserve the exaggerated respect they receive.’
    • ‘Many professional dancers make ends meet, or simply share their love of the art, by teaching classes in studios that are surprisingly manageable for your average clumsy oaf.’
    • ‘This idiot and his team of oafs had the audacity to patronize and laugh at Eugene last night.’
    • ‘And he has been nothing but a gentleman compared to the big oaf whose been trying to bully him.’
    • ‘And certainly it's just the tip of the iceberg with this militant oaf.’
    • ‘I didn't want to get married to a big oaf, so I ran away.’
    • ‘She smiled and sipped her coffee, but he still heard her murmur, ‘Uncultured oaf.’’
    • ‘He sighed as well, thinking of the treat he would get if he ever got to apologize to the big oaf.’
    • ‘Soon every brigand of note, every pirate and village oaf will declare themselves lord of their fief and kingdom and it will all be up for anyone with the mightiest resource.’
    • ‘The oaf in question was met with a barrage of abuse - as we pointed out that we had a baby on board who was scared witless and screaming.’
    • ‘‘Yes, and we will make a raft of you big oafs, you and my brother Bolo,’ laughed Nalu.’
    • ‘They are big oafs with naught but lust for young maidens like you.’
    • ‘Wasn't there some scrawny woman called Emma, and a big oaf who was in love with her?’
    • ‘Much as I would rather sit and stare into space than talk to such oafs, that would have been both rude and a missed opportunity - they were, after all, supposed to be the bee's knees.’
    • ‘The second time, he had tripped over something, and Mary had called him ‘a clumsy oaf.’’
    • ‘To some, the director-general is an oaf dressed in jester's clothing, a big-mouthed fool with a propensity to put his foot in it.’
    • ‘Anyone who is tormented by that oaf next door deserves a consolation dinner.’
    • ‘‘I'm not your animal to man handle you oaf! ‘she announced, ducking in an attempt to get past him.’’
    • ‘But clearly the lumbering oaf thinks they're all trying it on.’
    • ‘Raziel sighed and shook his head, ‘Forget about that oaf.’’
    • ‘What a shameful exercise in valuing the life of a stupid and dangerous oaf over the lives of millions of others.’
    • ‘That ungentlemanly oaf - he should have at least thought of giving you a ride back here.’
    • ‘Besides its not like me and you haven't done that before you stupid oaf!’
    • ‘Bart, you brainless oaf, the least you could've done for her is give her your coat.’
    • ‘‘Look where you're going, you oaf!’ she shouted at him.’
    • ‘I screamed at Justin, ‘You're hurting me you oaf!’’
    • ‘Female waitresses and bartenders everywhere know exactly what it's like to have to simper in silence in the face of some witless, leering oaf.’
    • ‘It'd be better than being here with a big oaf who cares nothing about nobody!’
    • ‘It is a mystery beyond all mysteries, unless, I do not think this could be possible, could one of my daughters have fallen in love with this oaf and told him everything?’
    • ‘They might have given me the glare, and mumbled something under their breath like, ‘Where did this oaf learn to drive?’’
    • ‘Rather than let those stereotypes build walls, I wanted to show people that bodybuilders are so much more than just big musclebound oafs to be afraid of.’
    • ‘Seriously, if a man is a clumsy oaf before you met him, he'll always have that streak of clumsiness.’
    • ‘Nowadays it is the footballers who behave like oafs off the field, while rugby players act like hooligans on it.’
    • ‘Such a clumsy oaf should never be allowed to dance, much less with such energy.’
    • ‘Why did they all seem to think that I fell feelings for that insignificant oaf whose purpose of living is to make other lives - well mostly mine - completely and utterly wretched?’
    • ‘It is like that wit-less oaf to suggest such a ludicrous thing.’
    • ‘If the story so obviously made no sense that any chat show oaf could tear it apart, I don't think they'd be taking it as seriously as they are.’
    • ‘Our branch contains a fair number of clumsy oafs and we own a hard boat with plenty of deck space for stumbling about.’
    • ‘That is, I am insensitive, brutal, clumsy and a big oaf.’
    lout, boor, barbarian, neanderthal, churl, clown, gawk, hulk, bumpkin, yokel
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: variant of obsolete auf, from Old Norse álfr ‘elf’. The original meaning was ‘elf's child, changeling’, later ‘idiot child’ and ‘halfwit’, generalized in the current sense.

Pronunciation

oaf

/oʊf//ōf/