Definition of nurture in English:

nurture

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Care for and encourage the growth or development of.

    ‘Jarrett was nurtured by his parents in a close-knit family’
    • ‘Doherty took the rural heartlands he has so carefully nurtured over the past four years.’
    • ‘So how are churches today seeking to nurture the next generation of Christian social activists?’
    • ‘America identifies and nurtures talent more methodically than any society I have heard about.’
    • ‘However, their lovingly nurtured plots could be swallowed up by Eastleigh Council's plans to build hundreds of homes.’
    • ‘"Hopefully we are nurturing the next generation of black and Asian magistrates.’
    • ‘The workshop would go a long way in nurturing female talent, she avers.’
    • ‘But she never nurtured her talents by painting either for pleasure or for business.’
    • ‘She nurtures creativity, including student compositions, and promotes a lifelong love of music.’
    • ‘You can say something that will either nurture the relationship or tear it down.’
    • ‘In reality, both soldiering and nurturing children are vital forms of public service.’
    • ‘Johnson also intends to nurture a new generation of " engaged political voices".’
    • ‘They also want to maintain their carefully nurtured relationships with individual solicitors.’
    • ‘At Mia's Montessori, each child's love of learning is carefully nurtured.’
    • ‘Properly nurtured the two central defenders have huge senior careers ahead of them.’
    • ‘The church is the seedbed of gospel preachers, and we must value and nurture what God plants among us.’
    • ‘The assistance these support services provide can help institutions create a more nurturing learning environment.’
    • ‘The mother nurtures the children and manages the household; the father legally provides for the family and the home.’
    • ‘Then, properly nurtured, they would be " hatched " into the real world as fully formed companies.’
    • ‘Agreed - a certain amount of natural skill is required - but that skill needs to be properly nurtured.’
    • ‘"Lobby groups " are destroying " the harmony that nurtures creativity".’
    encourage, promote, stimulate, develop, foster, cultivate, further, advance, boost, forward, contribute to, be conducive to, assist, help, aid, abet, strengthen, advantage, fuel
    bring up, care for, provide for, take care of, attend to, look after, rear, support, raise, foster, parent, mother, tend
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Help or encourage the development of.
      ‘my father nurtured my love of art’
      • ‘It is a way to increase knowledge and learn new skills, build confidence, and nurture a sense of place, and community.’
      • ‘Even better, your supervisor, a top researcher in the field, wants to nurture your interest in science.’
      • ‘Yet he seemed intent on alienating the very industry that had nurtured his awe-inspiring talent.’
      • ‘Develop and nurture a culture of firmness and fairness.’
      • ‘This could actually undermine brand equity by nurturing a negative brand attitude.’
      • ‘For those with artistic pretensions, he advises on how to stay sane while nurturing creative flow.’
      • ‘Following the inspiration of Saint Patrick we have to accept their faith has been nurtured in a different culture.’
      • ‘It seems to me that democracy's challenge is to nurture civic virtues among all citizens - not just elites.’
      • ‘He had spent his life always being there for me, pushing me to new heights, nurturing great ambitions.’
      • ‘In addition to the physical, parents also have trouble finding time to nurture their kids ' emotional well-being.’
      • ‘Support is what is needed to nurture Canadian cinema.’
      • ‘The leftovers are composted, helping to nurture a new cycle of growth.’
      • ‘A thousand years of theological disputes nurtured the habit of analytical thinking that could be applied to the analysis of natural phenomena.’
    2. 1.2Cherish (a hope, belief, or ambition)
      ‘for a long time she had nurtured the dream of buying a shop’
      • ‘He also nurtures a dream about this land which includes the virgin patch of forest, Silent Valley.’
      • ‘For a long time Vavilov nurtured the hope that he would be allowed to go to the Congress.’
      • ‘Having come this far, the city government now nurtures more ambitions.’
      • ‘Geddes nurtured the belief that common ground in culture, if used wisely, could do society real, practical good.’
      • ‘But there is also a sense that many of those who complain bitterly about the direction of government policy still nurture the hope that Tony is really on their side.’
      • ‘But did he nurture ambitions to return to Queen Margaret Drive?’
      • ‘A travel agent by day and dreamer by night, he nurtures idealistic hopes of becoming a TV writer.’
      • ‘Soldiers' allegiances were stronger towards their generals than the discredited deputies and army leaders began to nurture political ambitions of their own.’
      • ‘Pakistan, on the other hand, have serious worries ahead of the match and need to sort their bowling problems if they nurture any hope of a series-levelling comeback.’
      • ‘Her current heartthrob is superstar Shah Rukh Khan and she nurtures an ambition to meet up with King Khan.’
      • ‘After a couple of years as Rajya Sabha member, he nurtured hopes of being chief minister of the state.’
      • ‘The Golden Quartet line up was a dream Smith had nurtured for some 30 years till their formation in 2000.’
      • ‘Maybe we rushed too fast towards the dream we had secretly nurtured or maybe it just was just a chimera.’
      • ‘My mother had nurtured a hidden ambition to visit the Holy shrines of Badrinath and Kedarnath.’
      • ‘Others inside the party nurtured hopes of a return to past Stalinist glories or some form of militant syndicalism.’
      • ‘Many had nurtured hopes that a major clearout would be made, opening the door for a large number of appointments.’
      • ‘But maybe they nurture this belief that they live in a classless society and these status considerations conflict with that.’
      • ‘I have nurtured this ambition since I was a schoolgirl, but it was 17 years before I got around to achieving it.’
      • ‘The older man stored away in the trunk of his mind dates and memories from his own career, while his son nurtured the same ambitions he once had.’
      • ‘She nurtured the hope of becoming a teacher, a field of endeavour that received the approval of both parents.’

noun

  • 1The process of caring for and encouraging the growth or development of someone or something.

    ‘the nurture of ethics and integrity’
    • ‘Moreover, the Christian nurture model offered worried Protestant parents a much firmer guarantee of a child's good outcome.’
    • ‘The process of Christian nurture, from cradle to grave is continuous.’
    • ‘Children who've grown up without nurture apparently lack any sense that they can be something other than what they are.’
    • ‘These candidates should then be given support, nurture, and a challenge to test whether God is calling them to cross cultural borders with the gospel.’
    • ‘At stake is not the status of marriage in our society (important though that is) but the safe and sensitive nurture of all our children from whatever home background they come.’
    • ‘We must make the proper nurture of children our highest priority, but this can never be done in a risk-free way.’
    • ‘It needed nurture but the Labour council killed it off, ostensibly because it had debts of 130,000.’
    • ‘Also, another group of chicks will be brought over from Russia next year to go through the same nurture and acclimatisation routine that the current influx is undergoing.’
    • ‘In such prayer lies spiritual nurture and wholeness.’
    • ‘And nurture is interrupted again when your colleague's husband is stopped from checking their baby.’
    • ‘But how to price and value love, nurture, community trust and neighbourliness?’
    • ‘In the nurture of children, they are taught in both religious traditions.’
    • ‘One cone-shaped hill is topped with a rock pile like a nipple, a metaphor of nurture.’
    • ‘They have only vague, dim ideas about feelings, the development and nurture of human emotions.’
    • ‘Asleep, he dreamed again and again of a dying child who turned into a wet rag when he tried to comfort it - a terrible, potent image for a self allowed to slip away and powers of nurture never exercised.’
    • ‘Since March, hours of thought and planning have been spent on design, preparation and nurture.’
    • ‘Acceding to these requests seriously damages our understanding of conception and fatally fractures the link between parental relationships and infant nurture.’
    • ‘But the Jews had established places where worship and spiritual nurture could take place.’
    • ‘I don't just mean in the field of higher education, where Americans give, or give back, to their places of nurture on a scale that we find unthinkable.’
    • ‘She turned to one for advice and nurture, another for kicks, and another for career advice, and each knew what was expected of them.’
    encouragement, promotion, fostering, development, cultivation, boosting, furtherance, advancement
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Upbringing, education, and environment, contrasted with inborn characteristics as an influence on or determinant of personality.
      Often contrasted with nature
      • ‘But he overestimates the extent to which the supremacy of nurture is generally accepted.’
      • ‘Ridley's goal is to demolish this view and explain why Galton's nature / nurture dichotomy is erroneous.’
      • ‘I think we are who we are via nature (as a foundation) and then are further shaped by nurture.’
      • ‘In a John Steinbeck novel, two characters engage in the nature vs. nurture argument.’
      • ‘He himself grew up without his biological parents, being raised by a foster family, and is understandably sceptical about the elevation of biology over nurture.’
      • ‘The rapid transformation of warring societies into peaceful ones underscores the power of nurture over nature.’
      • ‘But it seems to the Professor that nurture has made women more receptive to the idea of retributive violence.’
      • ‘A lot of people have a problem with the nature versus nurture debate because they think then, ‘OK, if it's nurture, then it's curable’.’
      • ‘Of course, there is continuing debate about the extent to which such behaviours are inherent in our nature, or whether they are the result of nurture through a socialization process.’
      • ‘So whichever way you stand on the nature nurture debate, Kierkegaard was always likely to turn out a depressive.’
      • ‘He was quick to point out that nurture plays a big role, not just our genes.’
      • ‘In the nature / nurture debate there's room for both to have their influence.’
      • ‘Finally, the nature / / nurture debate is addressed throughout the book.’
      • ‘The upshot is that the age-old nature versus nurture dichotomy is completely erroneous.’
      • ‘I used to think that nurture had the upper hand and I'm slowly swinging the other way: I now tend to believe we're genetically predisposed for a lot of things.’
      • ‘You say you are interested in the nature/nurture debate, but all the evidence is with nurture in your presence.’
      • ‘Many on the left seem to assume that if everybody has the same nurture, then everybody will be equally intelligent.’
      • ‘Religion is a product of nurture and therefore a matter of choice. I reject discrimination on the grounds of religion.’
      • ‘Then we are left with an empirical question of understanding how nature and nurture interact.’
      • ‘The idea, however, that men and women are separated from each other merely by nurture is a relic of early feminism, which survives only because of lingering political correctness.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French noureture nourishment based on Latin nutrire feed, cherish.

Pronunciation:

nurture

/ˈnərCHər/