Definition of nuke in English:

nuke

noun

informal
  • 1A nuclear weapon.

    • ‘It's increasingly possible now for hostile states to acquire earlier generations of missile technology in the hope of some day being able to top them with nukes or biological weapons, the report warns.’
    • ‘It is only a matter of time before a dirty bomb, a suitcase nuke, or a biological attack hits an American city.’
    • ‘Washington needs a strategy based on the ‘Three No's’: no loose nukes, no nascent nukes, and no new nuclear states.’
    • ‘The nukes will spur Japanese deployment of ABMs and may nudge Japan toward deploying offensive forces.’
    • ‘That could lead to an Asian rim armed to the teeth with nukes and other weapons.’
    • ‘Death is death whether it comes in the form of a nuke, a bomb, a plane or an envelope.’
    • ‘Look, I'm no fan of how-to guides for chemical weapons or backyard nukes.’
    • ‘In 1984, I participated in a war game featuring a Cessna rigged with a tiny nuke and flown by a suicide pilot.’
    • ‘The United States is now considering developing a new generation of nuclear weapons, smart nukes which could be used to bust open bunkers and destroy weapons of mass destruction stockpiled by rogue states.’
    • ‘I can make or disable virtually any explosive except a nuke.’
    • ‘What will the next mayor of London say about war, occupation, new nukes, Trident, nuclear trains?’
    • ‘Syria has no links to al Qaeda, no weapons of mass destruction that could possibly harm the United States, no nukes or even a nuclear program.’
    • ‘There's lots of data available online about suitcase nukes, and nuclear weapons generally.’
    • ‘In addition to the United States and Russia, only China is believed to have a large stockpile of about 120 TNWs or ‘baby nukes.’’
    • ‘Statistically, you have a much greater chance of meeting your maker as a result of a traffic accident on Sukhumvit Highway than from a car bomb or terrorist nuke.’
    • ‘It's always seemed to me that that likeliest scenario is a loose nuke or a dirty bomb in a shipping container.’
    • ‘It fired no nukes or chemical weapons, and posed us no danger.’
    • ‘In 1958, the US began to deploy hundreds of nuclear warheads, atomic mines, artillery shells and air-dropped nukes in South Korea.’
    • ‘Tactical nukes can be launched over an unpopulated area from field artillery guns or aircraft to halt an enemy advance or in an effort to intimidate a numerically stronger enemy.’
    • ‘I assume they aren't carrying nukes - ICBMs would be the preferred delivery system in that case - so all we have are a few bombers with a few payloads of ordinary bombs.’
    1. 1.1 A nuclear power station.
    2. 1.2 A nuclear-powered vessel.
      • ‘The new enemy uses diesel-electric boats which, when running just on batteries, are much more difficult to find than those always loud Soviet nukes.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • 1Attack or destroy with nuclear weapons.

    • ‘There's nothing Christian about nuking Afghan civilians, nor spying on American students; just as there is nothing Muslim about hijacking planes and flying them into the twin towers of the World Trade Centre or the Pentagon.’
    • ‘Consider the absurdity: We risk escalating a worldwide nuclear arms race to nuke a shadow terrorist enemy whose most effective military action to date was begun with box cutters.’
    • ‘Otherwise radical moves might result in these two nations ending up nuking each other.’
    • ‘Qualified though my admiration for Lady Thatcher may be, I find it hard to believe that she'd have nuked Buenos Aires just to make a point.’
    • ‘You'd almost think that he wanted them to nuke California or something… perhaps its because they're democrats?’
    • ‘Not that I'm saying Shanghai ought to have been nuked, merely if victory was required, then it might have been necessary.’
    • ‘If it doesn't, well he can always nuke the site from orbit and claim there was a nuclear accident.’
    • ‘We talked about it in the pub with the usual cross section of people giving off views ranging from the eminently sensible to the completely barking view of nuking them all.’
    • ‘It's not a case of ‘if you're planning to nuke us, we're going to nuke you’ it's a case of ‘if we think you're going to attack us, we're going to nuke you.’’
    • ‘We might stop an attack or two by nuking every Islamic city from Tangier to Islamabad - but, come morning, we'll have to look ourselves in the mirror.’
    • ‘Why don't we try to destroy tropical cyclones by nuking them?’
    • ‘After all, you can't nuke Bethlehem without Israel being exposed to nuclear fallout.’
    • ‘There was constant hysterical invocation of an absurd counterfactual scenario: ‘What if he actually was planning to nuke us in 45 minutes?’’
    • ‘Though unlike the 1968 version, where we've nuked ourselves and devastated the planet, there's no actual evidence of that here.’
    • ‘So, why not just use man-made nuclear energy and nuke the planet today?’
    • ‘Back on the beach, the rising moon looked really cool - it was orange and smokey and made it look like Melbourne had been nuked until it rose a bit higher and we could see the bottom.’
    • ‘So, if the ultimate nightmare happens, and a terrorist cell gets its hands on a black-market bomb and manages to detonate it, the US proposes to nuke some random country as revenge.’
    • ‘He asks Brigadier General Paul Tibbets, who dropped the atom bomb on Hiroshima, how he feels when people say ‘Let's nuke 'em’.’
    • ‘You said ‘send conventional troops that he can only repel with his nuclear weapons, which will cause us to nuke him’.’
    • ‘No, we didn't actually get nuked or wiped out by ebola or nerve gas; aliens didn't land on the White House lawn.’
    1. 1.1 Destroy; get rid of.
      ‘I fertilized the lawn and nuked the weeds’
      • ‘‘I think I just nuked the computer's hard drive,’ I said, quivering.’
      • ‘I have escaped, and with the help of your suggestively named, buxom employee, I shall stop you from nuking the U.S. gold supply!’
      • ‘You may have trouble finding a copy of this as Real nuked the original downloads a while back, but a bit of googling should find it.’
      • ‘After Valve updated the official FAQ entry with a recommendation to try out the latest beta video drivers, I gave it a try. 67.02 are the latest Detonators, so I nuked the previous set with Driver Cleaner and reinstalled.’
      • ‘So I ended up even sicker, in bed, and in between sleeping, feeling sorry for myself, and nuking the jumping spider (the exciting highlight of the weekend), I did some thinking.’
      • ‘Don't be afraid to nuke stuff that isn't interesting.’
      • ‘Suddenly, nuking the Powerbook and going fresh with Tiger is on my mind again.’
      • ‘I have bought some more slug stoppa granules from the DIY store, which was all they had in the slug prevention line that didn't involve nuking the little b * ggers.’
      • ‘He's disappointed at his lack of strength after nuking himself in a combination carnival ride / X-ray machine, but later when he dreams about his wife's fiery death, he's so angry that he turns into The Hulk.’
      • ‘Most of us are in the indifferent camp thus allowing politicians, theologians and academics to nuke the world, while producing between them, not one thing of true value.’
    2. 1.2 Cook or heat up (food) in a microwave oven.
      ‘I nuked a quick burger’
      • ‘If I have been working all day, it's getting late and he is hungry (which he invariably is, all day, every day) then it seems sensible rather than sadistic to nuke him a shepherd's pie in the microwave while boiling up a pot of peas and carrots.’
      • ‘So I nuked a jar of Veet Warm Wax, made a little pot of rooibos tea with honey and soy milk, and set up a portable radio and portable heater in the bathroom.’
      • ‘I really need to just shut off all the machines, nuke the leftover pizza and watch ‘Blind Date’ until my brains run out my nose.’
      • ‘In fact, you can even cook the rice, the chicken and the pepper and onion mixture in bulk, then quickly nuke them and throw this burrito together in minutes when the craving hits.’
      • ‘Unlike normal cooking, when food is nuked numerous chemical bonds are ruptured, leaving behind a trail of free radicals, ions, and other radiolytic byproducts.’
      • ‘While waiting for the microwave to nuke our meal, w sat down on the stools in the kitchen and began to talk.’
      • ‘Anyway, that's by the by. The point is that whilst idly nuking the noodles I noticed that the sell-by date was October 2172.’
      • ‘She pushed things around the refrigerator, looking for some convenient leftovers in a Rubbermaid container to nuke.’
      • ‘We watch through our fingers as another convenience meal is nuked in the microwave, another can of fizzy pop is guzzled, another packet of crisps scoffed.’
      • ‘‘There you are, Dolly,’ I said, doing my best to avoid tripping over a foot-winding Harry while I nuked a drop of Carnation Milk.’
      • ‘We use technology in our cooking… we nuke stuff.’
      • ‘The house was filled with the smells of after-school snacks being nuked as we walked in.’
      • ‘The food is cooked, not nuked, and cooking takes time. The slow pace suits the service, which is charming.’
      • ‘After several months when her comfort level increased, I progressed to putting a Hershey bar on a salad plate and nuking it into molten goodness.’
      • ‘And the cook, Jay Jay, earns five buckets of stars for serving happy drinkers real good food, not idiotic nuked empanadas!’
      • ‘He smiled a sexy smile and unwrapped the bowl, nuking it in the microwave for about 3 minutes.’
      • ‘You can nuke some for breakfast, or mix it with hot water for a quick vending-machine-free snack at work.’
      • ‘She poured milk into a glass and put it into the microwave to nuke it.’
      • ‘It's all very tasty, all very stylish and all very cold when you buy it frozen from Sainsbury's before nuking it in the microwave before your guests arrive.’
      • ‘I got home, nuked yesterday's pizza, read the paper.’

Origin

1950s: abbreviation of nuclear.

Pronunciation

nuke

/n(j)uk//n(y)o͞ok/