Definition of nuisance in US English:

nuisance

noun

  • 1A person, thing, or circumstance causing inconvenience or annoyance.

    ‘I hope you're not going to make a nuisance of yourself’
    ‘an unreasonable landlord could become a nuisance’
    • ‘The nuisance and bother that raises its head time and time again in Portlaoise did so again over the weekend.’
    • ‘Many felt it would be a nuisance and potentially dangerous.’
    • ‘To some of us the rain is merely a nuisance or an inconvenience.’
    • ‘There are also some plants brought in because they had a perceived potential use as garden ornamentals, but which have turned out to be pests or nuisances.’
    • ‘However, normally these dumped items will be removed during the programmed cleaning schedule or earlier if they are creating a hazard or a nuisance.’
    • ‘We are trying our best to stop this problem but it is a nuisance and an inconvenience.’
    • ‘The mechanically-propelled ones with an engine make a noise, are a nuisance and are dangerous.’
    • ‘It is no good merely viewing the young as a nuisance and a difficulty, especially when most of them are no such thing at all.’
    • ‘But those for whom enjoyment develops into aggression need to be weeded out before they can start to make a nuisance of themselves.’
    • ‘In return, they don't secede or otherwise make a nuisance of themselves.’
    • ‘Dogs are barred from many public places because they pose a serious hazard to health and can be a nuisance and danger.’
    • ‘In so doing they are creating a nuisance for residents, danger for themselves and a hazard for road users.’
    • ‘They don't want to go along to annual general meetings and make a nuisance of themselves.’
    • ‘Bonfires are a general nuisance and serious problem for anyone with a respiratory condition such as asthma or emphysema.’
    • ‘As a result, ministers are going to great lengths to point out that the deer is a fine animal, and must not be viewed as a pest or a nuisance.’
    • ‘If the newcomers wanted to make a go of it here and did not make a nuisance of themselves, they could be Australians.’
    • ‘I live in Beckenham in an area populated by many foxes and, yes, they do sometimes make a nuisance of themselves.’
    • ‘The White House listens to these outraged voices but considers them more a nuisance than genuine problem.’
    source of annoyance, source of irritation, annoyance, inconvenience, bore, bother, irritant, problem, difficulty, trouble, trial, burden
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Law
      • ‘A second exception to the rule is where there is a continuing injury, such as a continuing nuisance or trespass to land.’
      • ‘Under these laws, one may sue for nuisance, trespass, negligence, strict liability or product liability.’
      • ‘But he does not have a cause of action in nuisance for his personal injury, nor for interference with his personal enjoyment.’
      • ‘It was contended on behalf of the defendant that that failure amounted also the torts of nuisance and trespass.’
      • ‘The tort of nuisance is concerned with unlawful interference with the use or enjoyment of land.’
    2. 1.2Law

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘injury, hurt’): from Old French, ‘hurt’, from the verb nuire, from Latin nocere ‘to harm’.

Pronunciation

nuisance

/ˈn(j)usəns//ˈn(y)o͞osəns/