Definition of north–south in US English:

north–south

adjective

  • 1Extending between the north and the south.

    ‘the main north–south highway’
    as adverb ‘the trail runs north–south through the park’
    • ‘A large central gutter emphasizes the north–south axis of the roof.’
    • ‘The flats are north–south orientated, with living and dining areas located on the south side and the bedrooms to the north.’
    • ‘The original purpose-made museum building was set up in the 1890s on a site stretching north–south between two streets just south of the main railway station.’
    • ‘As a result of this north–south migration, familiarity with favorite products from home can prompt consumers to seek these same products when they are down south.’
    • ‘Running east-west, this intersects with the major retail strip on Church Street, which runs north–south.’
    • ‘The building is composed of two five-story structures connected by three full-lot floors and a north–south bridge at the second level.’
    • ‘The thermal chimneys introduce light into the north–south hallway.’
    • ‘It runs north–south along the length of the peninsula.’
    • ‘The Winter Garden runs roughly north–south, and is designed as a galleria, connecting two squares.’
    • ‘College Street runs roughly north–south along Hyde Park.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to the relationship between the northern and southern parts of the world or of a country, region, or town.
      ‘North–South differences were supplanted by the Civil Rights movement’
      • ‘The North–South divide-and-conquer strategy long followed by the EU and US in previous talks failed miserably on a more important front: it didn't contain a workable back-up plan if the developing countries refused to be pried apart.’
      • ‘This film makes for both an absorbing thriller and a potent comment on North–South relations.’
      • ‘California is about to upset the North–South balance by becoming the newest state in the union.’
      • ‘This makes the whole plot some kind of metaphor for Italy's perennial North–South identity crisis.’
      • ‘Can you tell me about the North–South theme that plays a part in their relationship?’
      • ‘There's the nagging sectionalism, the North–South bitterness that still raged a half-century after the Civil War and beyond.’
      • ‘He concludes his review with a number of questions about external versus internal forces and North–South differences in the evolution of fiscal and monetary institutions.’
      • ‘Margo finds evidence that the North–South wage gap that became prominent after the Civil War had its origins in the antebellum period.’
      • ‘Uniquely, the company has a joint mandate from both jurisdictions to bring North–South trade and business development into the mainstream of government policies north and south of the border.’
      • ‘What continues to be missed are the economic roots of the North–South conflict—roots which represent deviations from the free-trade ideal.’