Definition of nomenclature in English:

nomenclature

noun

  • 1The devising or choosing of names for things, especially in a science or other discipline.

    • ‘For reasons given by Nevo, we will follow the traditional nomenclature, which considers separate taxa.’
    • ‘The Levinson system of nomenclature was proposed originally for rare-earth minerals in order to avoid a proliferation of trivial names.’
    • ‘In conclusion, White's insistence on the need for consistency in mineral nomenclature is important, and, over time, I suspect that many of the problems he identifies will be sorted out.’
    • ‘In phylogenetic nomenclature, taxon name definitions are based on ancestry and descent rather than the possession of subjective ‘key’ characters.’
    • ‘The gene nomenclature follows the rules for gene symbols in wheat.’
    • ‘Then, as now, type specimens constituted the fundamental entity upon which species are described according to the rules of zoological nomenclature.’
    • ‘We follow the general rules of zebrafish nomenclature for designating locus and allele names.’
    • ‘Various aspects of nomenclature, classification, pathogenesis, antifungal therapy, laboratory methods and associated terminologies have been suitably updated.’
    • ‘What we need is a return to industry-wide nomenclature for malicious code; used by all vendors and facilitating the reporting, analysis, and resolution of such outbreaks.’
    • ‘Official codes of nomenclature continue to enforce this rule - one name, one species - although rooting out synonyms and homonyms is a constant struggle.’
    • ‘No consistent system of nomenclature has emerged for the description of stromatoporoid external morphology.’
    • ‘Jemima Lewis in the Telegraph makes some telling points about journalistic iconography and scientific nomenclature.’
    • ‘These set guidelines and publish a reports containing the rules of nomenclature.’
    • ‘Each type of study has produced its own system of nomenclature and, hence, classification.’
    • ‘As concerns nomenclature, inadvertently, Professor Judson fails to follow his own advice, no doubt because he is a historian, not a biologist.’
    • ‘The topics in those categories that were less widely dispersed throughout the curriculum included stereochemistry, drug design, drug nomenclature, natural products and biotechnology.’
    • ‘A few years ago they started a system of plate nomenclature - three letters, three numbers.’
    • ‘And, again as with wine, a whole complex system of nomenclature and description has grown up.’
    • ‘As usual, we must begin with a careful study of nomenclature, using well-established rules of anatomical deconstruction.’
    • ‘Chapter 2 provides an informative and readable summary of nomenclature covering the rules and concepts of the zoological and botanical codes and their relation to stability.’
    1. 1.1The body or system of names in a particular field.
      ‘the nomenclature of chemical compounds’
      • ‘As with alliance military technology, the interoperability of command systems and nomenclature is essential.’
      • ‘Part of the confusion regarding this nomenclature arises from the common lack of connection between the trace fossil name and the name of its original trace maker.’
      • ‘For various reasons, the traditional nomenclature is used here.’
      • ‘The majority of the terms in historical and currently used nomenclature have been summarized by Rosenqvist and van Kooten.’
      • ‘Genus and species nomenclature throughout this paper follow Sibley and Monroe, the most geographically comprehensive recent checklist.’
      • ‘The nomenclature for protein families often has a historical background.’
      • ‘The nomenclature of the gene names is explained in the Methods section’
      • ‘The result of this early work was the sometimes contradictory cellular nomenclature.’
      • ‘There is no systematic nomenclature for gene and protein names, which has led to a number of possible writing variants and synonyms being associated with the proteins that makes detection and classification difficult.’
      • ‘Although the original nomenclature is retained no attempt is made to interpret the coefficients in terms of the reaction processes that determine seedling growth.’
      • ‘It's a good thing for you that you didn't go into a biological science; if you had, you would have been dealing not only with a binomial system of nomenclature but one in which the words are in Latin.’
      • ‘This is the first attempt to document fully the nomenclatural history of a clade with the intent of proposing a coherent nomenclatural system to replace the traditional rank-based nomenclature.’
      • ‘His List of New Guinea Birds deals with the biogeography of those birds, as well as with their systematics and nomenclature.’
      • ‘One underlying concern that arose throughout the analysis was the variation in medication nomenclature.’
      • ‘Various histopathologic patterns of bronchiolar injury have been described and have led to confusing nomenclature with redundancies and overlapping terms.’
      • ‘There's a lot of truth in John Sturrock's warning about the tyranny of medical nomenclature.’
      • ‘Initially, Western readers will grapple with the code names and nomenclature of Soviet weapon systems - many do not even match the terms found in arms-control treaties sponsored by the Soviet Union.’
      • ‘In fact Irvine says Morrison's version largely sticks to its classical narrative and nomenclature, but she admits she was initially wary of being drawn into heavy-handed polemic.’
      • ‘A comprehensive index of all the microbiologic terms and bacterial nomenclature completes the book.’
      • ‘Classification and nomenclature have changed.’
    2. 1.2formal The term or terms applied to someone or something.
      ‘“customers” was preferred to the original nomenclature “passengers.”’
      • ‘Some of these nomenclatures are still encountered in the literature, but for simplicity, only the new abbreviations are used.’
      • ‘In the 1980s, this nomenclature fell into disuse with increasing focus on industry.’
      • ‘Many years ago, when A. M. Rosenthal was executive editor of the New York Times, I raised a small question of religious nomenclature which resulted in a change in the paper's style manual.’
      • ‘Customs procedures and nomenclatures and product standards will be harmonized, licensing procedures will be streamlined, visa requirements for travel will be expedited.’
      • ‘In doing so, the author's attention to detail is exceptional, with the reader being hard-pressed to find any technical errors amid the nomenclatures, characteristics or capabilities of equipment cited.’
      • ‘It would be as if a person simply made up new words or special meanings for words then recorded facts based on them, but then kept no record of that special nomenclature.’
      • ‘And how can it change its nomenclatures summarily like this, anyway?’
      • ‘When someone says they're seeking avant-garde people, does that just mean that they're looking for pretentious people, or is this nomenclature something I don't quite entirely understand?’
      • ‘And, I add, my duties didn't change much because of our vehicles' nomenclatures, just as NCO duties and responsibilities don't differ dramatically from what they were 50 or 60 years ago.’
      • ‘It is termed ‘humanitarian’, but a more apt nomenclature would instead be ‘crime against humanity’.’
      • ‘What we need to do is hurry up and integrate, not just bringing down tariffs but removing non-tariff barriers, harmonizing customs procedures and policies and agreeing on tariff nomenclatures,’ he said.’
      • ‘If you call with a complaint or a problem try to use the correct nomenclature or terminology for the part or problem you are addressing.’
      • ‘For convenience sake I have coined my own nomenclature.’
      • ‘In our culture, the meaning of ‘love’ has been all but lost, probably because we don't have the nomenclature in our language.’
      • ‘Rationalists have over the centuries and under different nomenclatures given lead to the struggle for civilisation.’
      • ‘Even a superficial look at nomenclatures will show that many of these models are irreconcilable, as shown in Figure 1 below.’
      • ‘Well we can go around in circles all day about the nomenclatures that we use.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from French, from Latin nomenclatura, from nomen name + clatura calling, summoning (from calare to call).

Pronunciation:

nomenclature

/ˈnōmənˌklāCHər/