Definition of nomad in English:

nomad

noun

  • 1A member of a people having no permanent abode, and who travel from place to place to find fresh pasture for their livestock.

    • ‘These people are the original nomads of North Africa, who were converted to Islam by invading Arab armies eons ago.’
    • ‘Among nomads, women make tents and have more freedom of movement.’
    • ‘The Germanic tribes were not nomads, they were farmers.’
    • ‘For centuries, there has been conflict between settled Black African farmers and Arab nomads.’
    • ‘Baluchi nomads live in tents made of palm matting stretched on poles.’
    • ‘Since the Kazaks were nomads, during the 1800s it was possible for large numbers of Slavic settlers to move into and seize the land inhabited by the Kazaks.’
    • ‘Local nomads reported the animals were sensitive to human presence and could be aggressive.’
    • ‘The interaction between the Eurasian pastoral nomads and the surrounding sedentary societies is a major theme in world history.’
    • ‘There are about two million nomads in Afghanistan.’
    • ‘Over the past two decades, the traditional balance between largely Arab nomads and mainly African farmers has broken down.’
    • ‘Political tensions exist between sedentary peoples and nomads.’
    • ‘Actually, however, its roots go back deeper to an ethnic dispute and power struggle between African farmers and Arab nomads over water and land rights.’
    • ‘Although they were originally nomads, most Uzbeks have been settled for more than three hundred years.’
    • ‘Devaji's family, like other Marwari nomads, has travelled all over the country before reaching the city five years ago.’
    • ‘Darfur, on the border with Chad and Central Africa, is home to some 80 tribes and ethnic groups divided between nomads of Arab origin and farmers of African origin.’
    • ‘It is an ongoing dispute between Arab nomads and African farmers which has recently been politicised.’
    • ‘The nomads bring their animals here to the town of InGall in Niger to feed on grass which is rich in salt minerals, believing that the practice fortifies the animals.’
    • ‘As I travelled with the nomads and researched about them I found that nomadism was more than just being on the move.’
    • ‘The Touareg people are nomads who traveled through the desert.’
    • ‘These events have transformed the usually stable Karens into terrified nomads and have turned many into stubborn rebel fighters.’
    itinerant, traveller, migrant, wanderer, wayfarer, roamer, rover, gypsy, bedouin
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person who does not stay long in the same place; a wanderer.
      • ‘He's a nomad, never staying in one place too long.’
      • ‘Asher has never stayed in one place for long; he is a nomad, and he remembers it well.’
      • ‘How long will she remain a wanderer, a nomad, with no place to go?’
      • ‘He was, in truth, a nomad, a rootless wanderer, trailing from one country to another and one place to another, varying longer stays with many restless shorter travels, living alone except when visiting or journeying with friends.’
      • ‘He remained a nomad, a figure displaced by the historical tragedies of the last century, an émigré.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French nomade, via Latin from Greek nomas, nomad- ‘roaming in search of pasture’, from the base of nemein ‘to pasture’.

Pronunciation

nomad

/ˈnoʊˌmæd//ˈnōˌmad/