Definition of new-fashioned in English:

new-fashioned

adjective

  • Of a new type or style; up to date.

    ‘selling your product the new-fashioned way’
    • ‘Over the past few years, the New York Yankees have won their championships the new-fashioned way; they bought them.’
    • ‘But perhaps it is the new-fashioned behaviours that need to be questioned, since the citizens of a democratic society should expect their organizations to serve them, and not vice versa.’
    • ‘Set in the author's home town of Montreal, it featured a French-descended detective called Emile Cinq-Mars - ‘an old-fashioned cop in a new-fashioned world.’’
    • ‘The Board of the Johannesburg Art Foundation, which housed the gallery, decided in the best interests of the school to concentrate on active part time programme and to refurbish its image from a college to new-fashioned community centre.’
    • ‘Unlike (effortless elision here) the surface of the new-fashioned loathsome double-decker conductorless buses.’
    • ‘Some of his contemporaries - Weelkes in particular - quickly fell under the spell of these new-fashioned pieces, and imitated them.’
    • ‘Perhaps we can help here: ASP or Application Service Provider is an old-fashioned bureau service/leasing concept, wrapped up in new-fashioned togs.’
    • ‘The Pens will do it the new-fashioned way: by going with the kids.’
    • ‘What we have is a very productive alliance of parapsychologists, old-fashioned mystics, new-fashioned mystics, and psychedelic mystics that has gotten a major foothold in medicine.’
    • ‘Old-fashioned and even new-fashioned leftism (like California's ‘Redwood Rabbis,’ considered proper subjects for ridicule) was not only unnecessary and silly but dangerous to Jewish progress.’
    • ‘It even has an emergency siren and flashing light for getting help the new-fashioned way.’
    novel, fresh, original, unhackneyed, imaginative, creative, experimental, contemporary, modernist, up to date
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Pronunciation

new-fashioned

/ˈn(y)o͞oˌfaSHənd/