Definition of new in English:



  • 1Not existing before; made, introduced, or discovered recently or now for the first time.

    ‘new crop varieties’
    ‘this tendency is not new’
    ‘a fascinating mix of the old and the new’
    • ‘So how do we transfer genetic traits into crop varieties and how do crop breeders develop new varieties?’
    • ‘They make it possible to introduce millions of new numbers over the coming years.’
    • ‘When the new currency was launched we were told it would be so strong it would rival the dollar as a world currency.’
    • ‘We were not so hidebound by tradition, so we had to discover new ways to express ourselves.’
    • ‘Under new rules introduced to Super League this year it is not ruled a knock on if the player is not targeting the ball.’
    • ‘In the meantime, a number of new measures have been introduced to increase police visibility.’
    • ‘The company is also introducing new innovations to members to retain their loyalty.’
    • ‘Search engines are an excellent way of checking on the arrival of a new words in the language.’
    • ‘Each year seed companies and plant breeders introduce dozens of new varieties and hybrids.’
    • ‘Finding the key to making this foam would be like discovering a new planet.’
    • ‘You introduce your new album with a skit where a rock musician tries to alter your music.’
    • ‘That is stating the obvious; it does not introduce a new term into the contract.’
    • ‘For both business and economy travellers we will be introducing a range of new features.’
    • ‘Hope lies in discovering a new test to screen for the disease.’
    • ‘Decades later he discovered a new species of theropod and named it Gojirasaurus.’
    • ‘Airlines have introduced new services at Manchester to cope with a passenger boom.’
    • ‘The building society discovered its new sideline when it decided to upgrade its system two years ago.’
    • ‘We must be vigilant to ensure that weeds do not become noxious as a result of any new crop variety.’
    • ‘It isn't the studios who will discover how the new medium is going to work.’
    • ‘Nor is the First Minister seeking to introduce new laws on the expression of extreme views.’
    novel, fresh, original, unhackneyed, imaginative, creative, experimental, new-fashioned, contemporary, modernist, up to date
    recently developed, newly discovered, brand new, up to the minute, up to date, latest, current, state-of-the-art, contemporary, present-day, advanced, recent, modern
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Not previously used or owned.
      ‘a secondhand bus cost a fraction of a new one’
      • ‘Made from delicately embroidered cotton, the gown looks almost new on the happy baby.’
      • ‘She has opted for used books because there is not that much difference to new ones.’
      • ‘The poor old thing was purchased new, and now has a rather worn binding and some book tape holding it together.’
      • ‘I shall embark on a long project to acquire new or used copies of them all, regardless.’
      unused, brand new, as new, pristine, fresh, mint, in mint condition
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    2. 1.2Of recent origin or arrival.
      ‘a new baby’
      • ‘Just imagine what inept superpowers Ben and Jennifer's new baby girl must have.’
      • ‘Get other family members to help write the family tree, complete with your new addition.’
      • ‘A thousand questions are washed away in a trickle of tears and soon they have a new baby boy.’
      • ‘It is not yet known when Victoria will leave and give the world its first glimpse of her new baby boy.’
      • ‘Felix loves his new baby brother and just wants to cuddle him and coo over him, as we do.’
      • ‘Quite recently, yesterday in fact, we had a new addition to our family of four.’
      • ‘So I've put it away for now and started knitting a shawl for the new baby due in July.’
      • ‘My father ended up with my brother, sister Fifi and the impending new addition.’
      • ‘Go with God and good luck to you and your spouse and the soon to be new addition to your family.’
      • ‘For his part, Sebastien Balleux said he has a lot of catching up to do with a new baby coming soon.’
      • ‘Then the next day when her dad was taking her new baby brother home, they got in a car accident.’
      • ‘This day, however, she chose to draw a picture of her new baby brother.’
    3. 1.3(of vegetables) dug or harvested early in the season.
      ‘new potatoes’
      • ‘The chicken was tender and nicely cooked and the creamy mash made a welcome change from new potatoes or chips.’
      • ‘Cadmar ladled up the fish he had boiled with new onions and cress, and so we ate.’
      • ‘This was accompanied by a dish of new potatoes, green beans, carrots and celeriac strips.’
      • ‘Wipe the new potatoes, cut them in half lengthways then drop them into a mixing bowl.’
      • ‘All main courses are served with a choice of chips, jacket or new potatoes and fresh vegetables or salad.’
      • ‘My worst time of year was when we had loads of bitter, little new potatoes with the skin left on.’
      • ‘With the grilled Sea Bass, an order of chips, with the steamed, boiled new potatoes.’
      • ‘This was in fact me taking some salad stuff from Marks's round to his and boiling up some new potatoes.’
      • ‘So much more interesting to eat with fish than over-priced new potatoes from who knows where.’
      • ‘There was just sufficient new potatoes and salad to make this a very satisfying dish.’
      • ‘The flavour is fresh, rather like that of new potatoes, and the texture delicate.’
      • ‘Serve with buttered, boiled new potatoes, using the remainder of the mint as a garnish for the lamb.’
      • ‘It came with a side dish packed with new potatoes, green beans and cauliflower cheese.’
      • ‘Serve immediately with lots of fresh bread to mop up the spicy juices, or with new potatoes.’
      • ‘Scrape it onto your plate and use it to smother a dish of new potatoes - mountain food at its best.’
  • 2Already existing but seen, experienced, or acquired recently or now for the first time.

    ‘her new bike’
    • ‘We're not talking about a couple of new sofas and some fresh carpet in the corridor.’
    • ‘To experience new emotions, good and bad, we have to climb the mountains, and swim the ocean.’
    • ‘So I got out my Windows CDs and just decided to do a fresh install on the new drive and forget I had the old one.’
    • ‘The shopping centre in the middle of the Hammersmith roundabout has acquired a new statue.’
    • ‘I stumbled across this book as I had read the last of my paper books and am waiting for the arrival of two new ones.’
    • ‘I waited at home this morning for the arrival of a new bed for our spare room.’
    • ‘If he acquires something new for his home, he always gives away a similar object.’
    • ‘In fact, to eat durions, is a new sensation worth a voyage to the East to experience.’
    • ‘It was therefore with mixed feelings that we have acquired a new cat - a kitten really.’
    1. 2.1[predicative]Unfamiliar or strange to (someone)
      ‘a way of living that was new to me’
      • ‘Student insobriety and its management are not new to college authorities.’
      • ‘Everything is new to me again right now, and I have to concentrate on having a good season with Aberdeen.’
      • ‘Everything was fresh and new to Cherry, and there were choices everywhere she turned.’
      • ‘The ways of the industry may not be new to him, but the experience certainly is.’
      • ‘Learning a new language is acquainting oneself with a culture that is new to you.’
      • ‘Because, as well as the build-up being all new and a cup final being new to most of the players, so too was a cup final defeat.’
      • ‘Tim's blog is new to me and is probably new to you, but the man knows how to fisk.’
      • ‘If the name is new to you, this would be a great introduction to a major talent.’
      • ‘All were new to us, especially the eggs, which came out brown and wrinkled, but all had nice if crazy tastes.’
      • ‘Thankfully, the bulk of the words aren't new to me, although I'm far from fluent.’
      • ‘The attention was new to him, and he found out the hard way how things can back-fire.’
      • ‘He noticed that I had taken to this amazing drink, totally new to me, schnapps.’
      • ‘I've already got two daughters who have been independent for several years so it's not as if all this is new to me.’
      • ‘Fielding the complaints of disgruntled fans is nothing new to Liverpool coach Rafa Benitez.’
      • ‘People don't know what to do when they see me riding my bike, it's strange and new to them.’
      • ‘After the election, the new people in charge were new to the project and the project was new to them.’
      • ‘I have to admit, much of what he talks about it completely new to me, but that's half the fun.’
      • ‘That's maybe something that's new to some of the lads that have been here.’
      • ‘All the anecdotes were new to us, the creaking chair-bound jokes fresh as this morning's lox.’
      • ‘If you have trouble downloading it please let me know, since this is new to me.’
      unacquainted with, unused to, unaccustomed to, unconversant with, unpractised in, inexperienced in, unskilled in, unversed in, uninformed about, unenlightened about, ignorant of, uninitiated in, new to, fresh to, strange to, a stranger to, unaware of
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2[predicative](of a person) inexperienced at or unaccustomed to doing (something)
      ‘I'm quite new to gardening’
      • ‘They didn't know I was new at this, how could they tell?’
      • ‘They were new at this and would surely get it together eventually.’
      • ‘Neither team nor driver is new to this sport, and both have had to overcome reputations as brash newcomers.’
      • ‘Patten noted that victory relied on nationally-ranked athletes but also those new to the sport.’
      • ‘Devils in contrast ran on with 15, many of them either new to the game or fresh into town.’
      • ‘He had never had a friend, period, so he was quite new at the business.’
      • ‘‘The last time we were on strike we were new at the game and were badly led,’ said John Young, station officer in Maryhill.’
      • ‘Those new to the sport may well be unaware of the scoring, so here is a brief summary of the simple system.’
      • ‘The error - by an accountant new to the job - went unnoticed for more than three months.’
      • ‘I'm probably too new at legal academia to have a very good answer to this question, but I thought I would give it a try.’
      • ‘Check out local adult education courses for photography courses if you're completely new to it.’
      • ‘P.S. I'm new at this so I apologize if my manners are a little rough.’
      • ‘There will, as usual, be a few at Celtic Park who are new to the experience.’
      • ‘She was lecturing him about how things worked here since he's still quite new at this.’
      • ‘He was quite new at being a father, but found it came surprisingly easily.’
      • ‘Over half the elected councillors are new to the county council and can lead a fresh start.’
      • ‘So I'm quite new at it, I'm still naïve and eager, which is why I'm in the publicity role.’
      • ‘If you are new to researching your family history you will receive invaluable advice about where and how to start.’
      • ‘It was a notable win for the girls who are very much new to the football scene.’
      • ‘But clearly we are both brand new to it so we are looking at it with a fresh pair of eyes.’
    3. 2.3Different from a recent previous one.
      ‘I have a new assistant’
      ‘this would be her new home’
      • ‘The problem is political change, because every new government has different ideas.’
      • ‘Both will be delivered in the days immediately following our arrival at the new house.’
      • ‘He said his union, the largest at Bingley Grammar, would allow the boy a fresh start at his new school.’
      • ‘So what I am trying to do is to slowly shift myself to new, different territory.’
      • ‘It was never going to be a quiet arrival when the new boss of Nestlé Rowntree took up his post.’
      • ‘The branch has many cats, aged from two months to ten years, who would love a fresh start in a new home for the New Year.’
      • ‘Only later, in different times and new hands, does it transcend its bad faith.’
      • ‘He saw his new flat as a fresh start but if it came to that, he would accept the decision of the court.’
      • ‘On all previous form, the new appointee will not be any of those canvassed in the press.’
      • ‘Children would also be allowed to take toys away with them when they make a fresh start in a new home.’
      • ‘The company now plans to relaunch itself with a new image and a different name.’
      • ‘The only difference was her new haircut, shorn sides and a spiked up fin, now dyed black.’
      • ‘She returned to a new home in a different district where she believed the risks would be lower.’
      • ‘If it is down to the players, why has their improvement coincided with arrival of a new coach?’
      • ‘He will be grateful for the arrival of the new manager in the next few days though.’
      • ‘This should be closely monitored to see if the new lights make any difference.’
      • ‘Kevin Watson's arrival as the new principal provides the opportunity of a fresh start.’
      • ‘As he is a purchase of the previous management team the new manager has no emotional ties to him.’
      • ‘The fundamental thing that nobody tells you is just how different this new job is from your old one.’
      • ‘That is until a new shop assistant starts, with more on her mind than angora.’
      different, another, alternative, changed, unfamiliar, unknown, strange, unaccustomed, untried
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    4. 2.4In addition to another or others already existing.
      ‘recruiting new pilots overseas’
      • ‘What value do you place on making a contact that turns into new business for your company?’
      • ‘They took pay cuts and worked Sundays for over two years just to keep clients happy and bring new business in.’
      • ‘We had four customers at first but Dad hired a canvasser who went out and got new business.’
      • ‘For him, new team-mates equate to fresh judges who need to be convinced of his worth.’
      • ‘We need to modernise the Post Office - to give it new business so local offices stay open.’
      • ‘Hush have also had some line-up changes with the addition of new drummer Shaun Phear.’
      • ‘The new year has brought some dramatic changes at the loch with the addition of three new fisheries.’
      • ‘Order books improved, but firms struggled to win new business in overseas markets.’
      • ‘The special new-year offer is open to both new and renewing subscribers until tomorrow.’
      • ‘Life after cricket will involve working in corporate PR and new business at Surrey.’
      • ‘This was clearly not how the chairlady expected things to run with a new addition to their numbers.’
      • ‘Division two saw the usual suspects duelling it out with the addition of some new faces.’
      • ‘Maggie was fast asleep on her bean bag, she is suffering at the moment with the arrival of some new teeth.’
      • ‘Small businesses will simply have an additional new tax regime to those they already have to face.’
      • ‘In addition, two other new JPs who live in the borough were sworn in to serve in neighbouring courts.’
      • ‘Mr Grant said the town was already being proactive in attracting new business.’
      additional, added, extra, increased, more, supplementary, supplemental, further, another, fresh
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    5. 2.5(in place names) discovered or founded later than and named after.
      ‘New York’
      • ‘On the other hand, I thought Seinfeld was too New York-centric, so what do I know?’
      • ‘The youngsters are members of the New Bury Residents' Association Boomwhackers Group.’
      • ‘Another eye catcher, who was to go on in the same vein, was New York-trained Grannum.’
      • ‘A New York-based movie producer has told Byrne he's thinking about making a film version.’
      • ‘She has contacted Bolton and Bury councils, asking that she is moved to another house outside New Bury.’
      • ‘So now we have a Japanese company, run by a New York-based Briton who speaks no Japanese.’
      • ‘It is not connected with the well-known New York-based agency Wilhelmina Models.’
      • ‘Yet the hotel rooms aren't as enticing as the subway in New York.’
      • ‘Another thing people in New Germany are proud of is New Germany Rural High School.’
      • ‘York's Ladies went back to the top of the North Eastern Indoor Bowls League at the expense of New Earswick.’
      • ‘The others are the Derwent Valley Mills in Derbyshire, and New Lanark in South Lanarkshire.’
      • ‘David Radler was often there; it was owned by his father, a New York-born restaurateur.’
      • ‘The group hope one day to get the chance to run through New York.’
      • ‘Matt is in Florida and Gavin is in New Hampshire.’
  • 3Just beginning or beginning anew and regarded as better than what went before.

    ‘starting a new life’
    ‘the new South Africa’
    • ‘What is happening in Iraq and in Palestine is just the beginning of what America calls the new era.’
    • ‘The first mission was described as the beginning of a new era of human spaceflight.’
    • ‘This new beginning is to add colour to the carnival as well as the college cultural season.’
    • ‘Liberated to occupy the whole of the main gallery area, it is transformed by its new monumentality.’
    • ‘They are likely to be released next year and will be given new lives and fresh identities.’
    • ‘You inspire others to make new beginnings, which have been put on hold for some time.’
    • ‘It is full of nostalgia for a Scotland past and gone but full of hope for the new, modern Scotland.’
    • ‘But now he hopes to open the doors to a whole new era for the team, which went bust in 1997.’
    • ‘The new logo has been created to coincide with the move and to mark new beginnings.’
    • ‘The trip marks the beginning of a new life for Mrs Cawley, of Leaventhorpe Lane.’
    • ‘This week the U.S. and the world have begun to slowly adjust to life in this new era.’
    • ‘So is it now time to sit back and watch the arrival of a new phase in the industry?’
    • ‘For United, though, this was all about new beginnings rather than better finishing.’
    • ‘This was the beginning of a new era with the christening of the third ship to bear the name Perth.’
    • ‘Indeed, this week, we might well be standing on the threshold of a new era of violence.’
    • ‘This marks the beginning of a new kind of diplomacy in which the best of heaven is being invoked.’
    • ‘Lynn saw a new beginning for me following a reshaping of my life with things in my work and home becoming resettled.’
    • ‘Right from the start there was a community spirit, young families starting out on a new beginning.’
    • ‘The President may not have laid out how he wants to reach this new era of liberty, but he made it clear he knows where he wants to go.’
    • ‘Jesus came to give you a fresh new start, but this time with God in your life.’
    1. 3.1(of a person) reinvigorated or restored.
      ‘a bottle of pills would make him a new man’
      • ‘The man took seriously his being a new person and concluded that old relationships had passed away.’
      • ‘On the day Shesh packed his bags and kissed his mom goodbye, he felt like a whole new person.’
      • ‘Hello New and Improved Jason, who is filled with a renewed wonder for the world.’
      • ‘At the end of the ten weeks I was a new person, corny as it may sound I felt re-born.’
      reinvigorated, restored, revived, improved, refreshed, regenerated, reborn, renewed, remodelled
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    2. 3.2Superseding another or others of the same kind, and advanced in method or theory.
      ‘the new architecture’
      • ‘His actions make no sense especially in the week when a new range of highly advanced robots is unleashed.’
      • ‘In Chester, that leads to a hard line to all of the duff new architecture which is being thrown up.’
      • ‘Very new Modern art has become a little too cool and popular for its own good, he admits.’
      • ‘Britain played a major role in helping to bring about the new modern world.’
      • ‘The new architecture also has a significant impact on the power consumption and performance.’
      • ‘The attempts to build new and adventurous architecture in the islands is a positive one.’
      • ‘I look forward to your cooperation in this new and progressive advance of medical science.’
      the latest, modern, novel, the newest, ultra-modern, up to the minute, state-of-the-art, advanced, contemporary, fashionable, new-fashioned, gimmicky
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    3. 3.3Reviving another or others of the same kind.
      ‘the New Bohemians’
      • ‘The new conservatives saw that the rhetoric of self-sacrifice had become meaningless to the generation born after the revolution.’
      • ‘Meet Europe's new bohemians, a generation who've grown up with the idea of Europe as a united concept.’
      another, duplicate, reproduction, twin, double, replicate, matching
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  • [usually in combination] Newly; recently.

    ‘new-mown hay’
    ‘new-fallen snow’
    • ‘This wine resounds with the aromas and flavors of herbs, gooseberries, fresh lime, green apple, and new-mown hay.’
    • ‘This has given us a new-found freedom of investment and allowed us to look into some new asset classes.’
    • ‘For a man previously prepared to travel so far, this showed a new found laziness.’


  • a new one

    • informal An account, idea, or joke not previously encountered by someone.

      ‘I've heard of lazy, but somebody being too lazy to talk—that's a new one on me’
      • ‘Dealing with complaints when I'm not even clocked in is a new one even for me!’
      • ‘That's a new one on us, a new one that we hope goes straight out of fashion.’
  • what's new?

    • 1(said on greeting someone) what's going on? how are you?

      • ‘The Mothership also landed on Tuesday to eat our pasta and to sit on the couch asking, ‘So, what's new?’’
      • ‘Once the local gossip was out of the way, she took to her usual habit of saying, ‘So what's new?’’
    • 2That is the usual situation.

      ‘she and I squabbled—so what's new?’
      ‘men like to see women's legs. So what else is new?’
      • ‘The Brits, of course, seem gung-ho for such a relationship - but then, what's new?’
      • ‘They are almost invariably polarised at one extreme or another - but then, what's new!’
      • ‘And pity Amir isn't around to support his claims but what's new?’
      • ‘I have been very remiss in my posting (so what's new about that, Denise?) and am here to profess my sorrow and renewed commitment.’
      • ‘Oh, well, people always criticize presidents and their speeches, so what's new?’
      • ‘My initial reaction to MIND's campaign is to think, well what's new?’
      • ‘Of course I despair at the paucity of the budget, but what's new?’
      • ‘We're doing well, although we need more money, but what's new?’
      • ‘Today I shall be whingeing about everything (so what's new)?’
      • ‘To which an archenemy of capitalism might ask: yeah, so what's new?’


Old English nīwe, nēowe, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch nieuw and German neu, from an Indo-European root shared by Sanskrit nava, Latin novus, and Greek neos new.