Definition of neofascist in English:

neofascist

(also neo-Fascist)

noun

  • A member of an organization similar to the Italian Fascist movement of the early 20th century.

    • ‘Is it possible to imagine a single one of the major media figures standing up to the neo-fascists of the Republican right, or even seriously criticizing their activities?’
    • ‘So much for these neo-fascists claiming to be the voice of the working class white man.’
    • ‘The sentences differ dramatically from earlier sentences in trials of neo-fascists.’
    • ‘For the first time in the history of the Italian republic and for the first time in a democratic country of post-war Europe, some neo-fascists acquired ministerial portfolios.’
    • ‘There are decisive global lessons here, as we witness capitalist politicians of all stripes rallying to the call of neo-fascists that immigrants and refugees be excluded in the defence of ‘our borders’.’
    • ‘Anywhere else in the world the democrats would be considered a center right party and the republicans would be considered neo-fascists.’
    • ‘The most recently publicized incident took place last March, when a group of young neo-fascists in Rome attempted to murder 10 Eastern European and African immigrants by setting fire to their makeshift huts under a railroad trellis.’
    • ‘Russian police, militant Orthodox Christians and neo-fascists broke up a first ever gay rights march in Moscow, yesterday, but organisers claimed their protest as a ‘great victory’.’
    • ‘The only answer to the lies of the neo-fascists is to remove the causes of deprivation and environmental neglect by creating educational and job opportunities on the neglected estates and inner-cities.’
    • ‘But this has proved just as ineffective in preventing an increase in the ranks of neo-fascists as the prohibition of twenty right-wing organizations since 1980.’
    • ‘It doesn't seem to occur to their proponents that such a strengthening of the state's repressive apparatus, although superficially aimed at the neo-fascists, ultimately undermines democracy itself.’
    • ‘Due primarily to the influence of the Stalinist Communist Party of Italy, the working class remained passive and disoriented, allowing Forza Italia and the neo-fascists to profit.’
    • ‘The other is that of the militants of the extreme right, like the neo-fascists, who possibly feel politically isolated among a majority which they despise for being too indifferent and stupid to understand their message.’
    • ‘The American news media has become an exclusive tool of corporatists and neo-fascists.’
    • ‘In the streets in Vienna and across Europe, there is a new and angry resistance to the normalization of neo-fascists in government.’
    • ‘Terrorism was much more prevalent in Australia in an earlier period - particularly that committed by some Croatian neo-fascists, who set off a whole lot of bombs.’
    • ‘That despicable cabal of neo-fascists, the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission has shown its usual disdain for the public interest over the last two months.’
    • ‘The unprofessional handling of secret service information is a result of the fact that the connection between the neo-fascists and the secret service was long known in government circles and was regarded as completely normal.’
    • ‘He is content to mix with neo-fascists and appears to share many of their racist and anti-Semitic prejudices.’
    • ‘The SP's new-found concern about collusion between the governmental right and the neo-fascists is thoroughly opportunist and cynical, grounded in narrow electoral considerations.’
    authoritarian, totalitarian, autocrat, nazi, extreme right-winger, far right-winger, rightist, blackshirt, militarist
    View synonyms

adjective

  • Relating to neofascists or neofascism.

    • ‘When in 1960 an Italian Christian Democrat government accepted the votes of neo-fascist deputies in order to remain in office, massive demonstrations forced the prime minister to resign.’
    • ‘The fourteen other EU nations, anything but an assembly of radicals, have stated clearly that the inclusion of far-right or neo-fascist parties in EU governments violates those borders.’
    • ‘Last September, however, journalists from the Frankfurter Rundschau and the Tagesspiegel published a well-researched list of victims of neo-fascist violence.’
    • ‘Last weekend he applied to join the neo-fascist National Democratic Party of Germany.’
    • ‘We voters should show a lot of concern about what this neo-fascist Government intends.’
    • ‘I don't doubt that you are gay or Australian, but I would suggest that you are more neo-fascist than neo-con, if you agree with the policies of that site.’
    • ‘Its economy was adversely affected by the Great Depression and from 1934 until 1939 it experienced a highly autocratic, neo-fascist regime led by Konstantin Paets.’
    • ‘The more moderate tone of NA leaders is cited by many in Italy, including leading figures within the Olive Tree opposition, to claim the successful integration of a neo-fascist party into the democratic fold.’
    • ‘Now for persons like me and hundreds of others who oppose this neo-fascist government we would be thrown into jail without the options, like without a trial.’
    • ‘The early 1990s were also the years in which the first particularly brutal neo-fascist assaults took place in Germany.’
    • ‘So far the culprits have not been found, but the public prosecutor's office is assuming neo-fascist involvement due to the identity of the victims, most of whom were Russian émigré Jews.’
    • ‘In the decade since German reunification 28 people had died as a result of neo-fascist violence, three this year alone.’
    • ‘Similar positions are to be found in Europe among the right-wing and neo-fascist opponents of the European Union.’
    • ‘Not a day passes without editorialists, commentators, statesmen and politicians coming up with new proposals and resolutions on how to counter the brazen conduct of neo-fascist groups and the wave of violence against foreigners.’
    • ‘Hale had a long history of participation in white supremacist and neo-fascist groups.’
    • ‘This is why we on the left must reject the sneering insinuations of the liberals that in our no we find ourselves with strange neo-fascist bedfellows.’
    • ‘At the centre of its campaign has been the strengthening of the state security forces and the demand for a ban on the neo-fascist National Democratic Party of Germany.’
    • ‘They ruled out abstention as it would allow the neo-fascist National Front in.’
    • ‘The rise of neo-fascist groups in Europe show such people are all too ready waiting on the sidelines.’
    • ‘Not only can this slogan be found on skinheads' bomber jackets, but it also adorns the banners of the neo-fascist German National Party.’

Pronunciation:

neofascist

/ˌnēōˈfaSHəst/