Definition of narco in US English:

narco

noun

US
informal
  • 1Narcotics; illegal drugs.

    as modifier ‘the multi-billion dollar narco trade’
    • ‘$500 billion goes to the flow of narco traffickers.’
    • ‘Scientists note that the narco traders will simply breed their coca plants to be resistant to the disease.’
    • ‘The United States and the international community were successful in detecting people who were laundering money that is derived from narco trafficking.’
    • ‘I was kidnapped by the narco traffickers when I was running for mayor.’
    • ‘The common enemy that we have is narco trafficking.’
    • ‘Narco money has built 'legitimate' businesses and made Juarez the fourth-largest city in Mexico.’
    • ‘Narco trafficking is financing the guerrilla.’
    • ‘One can only imagine what the U.S. response would have been if the Colombians had tried to claim the same immunity for some of their own army narco traffickers.’
    • ‘But the magnificence of the movie lies in its portrait of Sheriff Ed Tom Bell, a 19th-century-style lawman caught up in a late-20 th-century narco war.’
    • ‘Dr Malini is a narco expert.’
    • ‘"Narcoterrorism" would be toothless if we in the US could find a more sensible way of dealing with the ever-present demand for "the narco."’
    • ‘They halted sales of the coca leaf to the burgeoning narco business.’
    • ‘The Malverde legend, introduced to Sarabia by cousins enamored with "narco culture," is a useful metaphor for the paradoxes of this contested territory.’
    • ‘The country is devolving into a "narco state" with about 60 per cent of its income derived from opium.’
    • ‘Many people say there are fantasies in the narco.’
    • ‘Several SUVs full of narco cops invaded his quiet suburban neighborhood, finding no drugs but only a startled household.’
    • ‘The complicity of the National Police in drug trafficking was turning the country into a narco state.’
    1. 1.1 A dealer in drugs.
      ‘political bosses who may have links to the narcos’
      • ‘They believe that governments are sincere about combating drugs and the narco.’
      • ‘Lots of freelance narcos are now claiming that they were paramilitaries all along, to get immunity.’
      • ‘The narcos' propensity for gold-plated toilets and loud parties has not endeared them to their neighbors in the fashionable districts.’
      • ‘The narcos burn the forest, plant a crop, contaminate the water, buy cattle, and cut down more trees for pasture.’
      • ‘In daylight, the narcos smuggle their loads across three bridges that link Juarez with El Paso.’
      • ‘Later, the narcos fought with the guerrillas, because they hadn't carried out the agreement to protect the crops and the laboratory.’
      • ‘Narcos are not ones to put up with competition.’
      • ‘Although members of the upper classes are not above profiting from the cocaine trade, they look down on the narcos in the same way that wealthy people the world over disdain the nouveau riche.’
      • ‘The narcos pay millions of dollars in bribes to stay above the law.’
      • ‘The insurgents, having failed to spark a leftist revolt, turned to the narcos for financial support to bring about revolution by force of arms.’
      • ‘They have rattled the narcos, impeding some trafficking routes and increasing weapons seizures.’
      • ‘Authorities believed his information about the "narcos" was explosive enough to put his life in danger.’
      • ‘When he was director of the Civil Air agency he gave pilots licenses to many narcos.’
      • ‘Citizenship and passports are easy to procure in Latin America, disguising the movements of terrorists and narcos.’
      • ‘Poor people idolise the narcos: they admire their bravery, and they want to be like them.’
      • ‘I saw some people in a restaurant tonight whom I thought looked like narcos.’
      • ‘The real narcos are as much of a threat to the forest as the loggers, through the devastating fires they set to clear land for poppy and marijuana production.’
      • ‘The Argentines fear that if the narcos are squeezed out of Colombia they will migrate to the vast spaces of Brazil.’
      • ‘He deployed 25,000 army troops last year to take on the narcos.’
      • ‘Many of the narcos are on the outside, they don't even know the inside of a jail cell.’

Origin

1950s: abbreviation of narcotic.

Pronunciation

narco

/ˈnɑrkoʊ//ˈnärkō/