Main definitions of nana in English

: nana1nana2

nana1

noun

British
informal
  • A silly person; a fool (often as a general term of abuse)

    ‘I was made to look a right nana’

Phrases

  • off one's nana

    • informal Mad or crazy.

      ‘he's absolutely gone off his nana’
      • ‘I could hear the dogs happily going off their 'nanas about someone being in the backyard.’
      • ‘Punters were absolutely going off their nanas during his set.’
      • ‘They whinge and go off their nanas as much as any other football fans do.’
      • ‘He'd be going off his 'nana. He wouldn't stand for it. He'd be like a raving lunatic.’
      • ‘I was off my nana on Class As.’

Origin

1960s: perhaps a shortening of banana.

Pronunciation

nana

/ˈnænə//ˈnanə/

Main definitions of nana in English

: nana1nana2

nana2

noun

informal
  • One's grandmother.

    • ‘My nana was still strong, even a few days before her death.’
    • ‘‘Okay, see you tomorrow, I love you,’ he hugs me then hugs my nana.’
    • ‘My nana had seven primary cancers and they started I think in her early 50s and she survived to about 73.’
    • ‘I grabbed the home phone - it was nanna - letting us know that she's going on a cruise with Alice, her cousin.’
    • ‘My nana used to crush nasty pills up into a spoonful of jam.’
    • ‘My nanna came in and helped at first when dad was in hospital.’
    • ‘My nanna brought me and my sister up and she always taught us that what you achieve in life comes through hard work.’
    • ‘My mum was really down after my nana died, so my aunty who lives in America decided to treat her to a holiday.’
    • ‘Saying she draws her culinary inspiration from her mum and her nana, Lisa is responsible for bread, biscuits and chocolates at the hotel as well as designing all the sweet menus.’
    • ‘She was doing fine living with her nana and grandpa.’
    • ‘Dean said he would pick up nanna and grandpa tomorrow at the airport.’
    • ‘I slept over my nana's last night and brought everything.’
    • ‘Long-gone is the nana of yesteryear, and with it the traditional image of grandmas at home, knitting over-sized cardigans and baking pies.’
    • ‘His parents always called his nana or papa when he became sick.’
    • ‘Daniel was my best friend, but I didn't love him like I did my nana.’
    • ‘I attended Catholic school with young Polish girls and my mother introduced me to the wonders of Greece while my nana stayed at home and prayed the rosary.’
    • ‘Ok, maybe nanna would let me stay on my own at the beach house?’
    • ‘‘I'd like to dedicate this to my nanna,’ he said after extending his career record to 21 wins.’
    • ‘My nanna and granddad are in their early 50s, and they don't wear old peoples' clothes.’
    • ‘And I forgot to say that one of my favourite, favourite exclamations is the one that I've only heard my nana, and latterly my mother, say.’
    grandma, granny
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: child's pronunciation of nanny or gran.

Pronunciation

nana

/ˈnænə//ˈnanə/