Definition of musical director in English:

musical director


  • The person responsible for the musical aspects of a performance, production, or organization, typically the conductor or leader of a music group.

    ‘in 1991 the New York Philharmonic hired a new musical director’
    • ‘He is also associated with the Dublin Concert Band and is musical director of the Ulysses Chamber Choir.’
    • ‘She is a musical director who in four years has brought the collective talent of more than forty young people to great heights.’
    • ‘In that life that is so far away and yet seems close enough to touch, musical directors sought to have my operas suppressed and my character smeared.’
    • ‘We have been very fortunate to have a number of very talented directors, musical directors and choreographers, nearly all of whom have been members of the society.’
    • ‘Ruth has also been having a not-so-secret affair with the composer and musical director of her film.’
    • ‘In 1990 he won Cacique awards in the categories of best composer and best musical director.’
    • ‘He was an accomplished musician and played violin, piano and organ and made a living as a musical director in the London theatre scene.’
    • ‘At the concert, the musical director announced the choir would perform the French national anthem.’
    • ‘We've always had good producers and good musical directors, that's a secret of our success.’
    • ‘Handel was appointed musical director, and he immediately went to Düsseldorf and Dresden to recruit singers.’
    • ‘He has performed as a soloist, musical director, and arranger worldwide.’
    • ‘A composer and musical director of distinction, it's rather like getting in Van Gogh to give your spare bedroom a lick of paint.’
    • ‘For most of the company's life, the musical director was the late John Cage.’
    • ‘He will be known to Portlaoise audiences since he was the musical director for the local panto group.’
    • ‘He has greatly contributed to ballet, developing, searching and establishing India's dance techniques, inspired by poets and musical directors from his country.’
    • ‘Fifty years later musical directors were still going at each other's throats over rehearsal times and financial allocations.’
    • ‘Thanks to the passion and desire for excellence of its youngest musical director, the Royal Opera House is undergoing rejuvenation.’
    • ‘Then we spent forty-five minutes on the songs with the musical director, often by the piano in my dressing room.’
    • ‘Rochdale Youth Orchestra has scored a major coup with its new musical director.’
    • ‘So, they took a picture of my musical director's wife and myself, because she was a nice looking lady.’