Main definitions of mush in English

: mush1mush2mush3

mush1

noun

  • 1A soft, wet, pulpy mass.

    ‘red lentils cook quickly and soon turn to mush’
    • ‘As I took my shower, I prayed that I wasn't going to have to do much thinking because my brain felt like mush.’
    • ‘The ground was like mud - inches of ashes and mush.’
    • ‘His dark hair, a little long, his grey eyes, and those dimples she saw when he grinned at her the day before… The combination can make the knees of any red blooded woman into mush.’
    • ‘In the camp's acute ward, a young man lies chained to his bed, being fed protein-and-vitamin mush through a stomach tube inserted via a nostril.’
    • ‘The poached eggs are perfectly cooked but the chef is over generous with the Hollandaise which collects in a large pool on the bottom of the plate, further guaranteeing that the bread base is nothing but mush.’
    • ‘The green leaves are cooked to a soft mush, and although tasty, the texture might be too much like purée for some.’
    • ‘They are sitting, in sweltering silence, in a drab Fifties dining room, contemplating plastic tubs of brown mush - a bottle of red wine providing the only festive touch.’
    • ‘The chips were fine, but the deep-fried tube of pink mush was not an experience to be quickly repeated.’
    • ‘A fairly decent-sized potato mush was topped with thin slivers of steak and then crowned with blue potato crisps.’
    • ‘The streets are dirty mush, black ice on the road and slippery sidewalks.’
    • ‘She woke to a groggy headache; her mind felt like mush and her eyes were refusing to obey her as she lay for perhaps ten minutes, waging a war that she really didn't care to win.’
    • ‘I also cooked down some apples into apple mush so that we can use that in a smoothie today.’
    • ‘I see the autumn harvests, frozen into black knots in the trees, the berries and fruit, left rotting on the floor and then all mush turned to ice on hard ground.’
    • ‘I snapped the hard outer crust and observed a softer kernel consisting of unidentifiable mush with what looked like carrots and bean skins protruding from it.’
    • ‘The last of the summer's flowers are mush, all the leaves have fallen off the maple and my chrysanthemums are looking a sorry sight.’
    • ‘Since there is a fine line between firm chunks and a sudden collapse into mush, avoid adding water.’
    • ‘These spacecraft scooped up mush and dirt and analysed it for biological activity.’
    • ‘The centre was completely rotten and the inner wood little more than mush.’
    • ‘I wanted bountiful heaps of chocolate fudge cake but instead received melted cups of mush.’
    • ‘The basic meal consists of a staple starch prepared as a sort of mush, eaten with a sauce that contains vegetables and meat or fish.’
    pap, pulp, slop, paste, purée, slush, swill, mash, pomace
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1North American Thick porridge, especially made of cornmeal.
      • ‘Because there can be no leavening products used during the holiday, matzo flour mush has the bran separated from the wheat because bran helps facilitate the leavening process.’
      • ‘Maize is used to produce various sorts of porridge or cornmeal mush.’
      • ‘He scooped up the sloppy bowl of thick mush that was mindlessly held out to him as he strode into the barracks.’
      • ‘If you like polenta - that creamy, golden, northern Italian mush - then you have a choice of slow or fast polenta.’
      • ‘Mary finished her porridge, swallowing the mush hastily before grabbing her overcoat and heading for the door.’
      • ‘They aren't to be confused with that Cream of Wheat mush.’
      • ‘How much longer until I'm no longer forced to eat mush?’
      • ‘I looked doubtfully down at the bowl full of mush.’
  • 2Feeble or cloying sentimentality.

    ‘the film's not just romantic mush’
    • ‘Dripping with sincerity, it descends into mawkish mush with all the profundity of a group hug.’
    • ‘And more importantly, he avoids turning all this into sentimental mush.’
    • ‘It's a sticky situation, alright: how do you make a funny, feel-good holiday movie that doesn't fall into the trap of turning into sentimental mush as soon as things start to get good?’
    • ‘The cards, covered in pastel colors and sentimental mush, were of the lovey-dovey variety.’
    sentimentality, mawkishness
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as adjective mushed
  • Reduce (a substance) to a soft, wet, pulpy mass.

    ‘simmer until the apples and potatoes are tender but not mushed’
    • ‘William took his tray and shoved her, mushing the pizza into her shirt.’
    • ‘I picked up a handful of snow from what was left on the bench and mushed it around in my hand idly.’
    • ‘Well do you have noodles slowly being mushed between the keys of your keyboard as you type?’
    • ‘It's all the fun of your favorite meat and cheese hero sandwich elegantly mushed up and served in a bread bowl.’

Origin

Late 17th century ( mush): apparently a variant of mash.

Pronunciation:

mush

/məSH/

Main definitions of mush in English

: mush1mush2mush3

mush2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Go on a journey across snow with a dogsled.

    ‘by the end of winter he will have snowshoed up to 700 miles and mushed about the same’
    • ‘After a hard day's mushing, when I'd been thrown from the sledge several times, I sometimes wished the menu had included husky.’
    • ‘‘People might think that we are crazy but I only took up mushing a year or so ago as a way to exercise my dog because she is hyper-active,’ he said.’
    • ‘‘That's kind of hot for mushing,’ he said, explaining that they will feed the dogs flavored ice chips to keep them cool.’
    • ‘The Iditarod consists of well-worn and easy-to-follow trails that local residents use throughout the year, mushing and snowmobiling from village to village.’
    • ‘As for ‘real life’, I spend a lot of my winters mushing - that's driving dogsled teams - through the snowy wastes of New Hampshire, Vermont and Quebec, and one is unlikely to run into many people five days out on the trail.’
    • ‘My goal this year was to finish with a healthy team and to have fun, (although one's idea of fun can be debatable when mushing and camping at - 50oC!).’
    • ‘By the time he left, 18 hours later, he was mushing for ninth place.’
    • ‘In January of that year, Hall had gone on a dogsledding vacation in Minnesota, mushing from lodge to lodge.’
    1. 1.1[with object] Urge on (the dogs) during a journey across snow with a dogsled.
      • ‘It's certainly great fun spending days mushing your own dog team.’
      • ‘Even when mushing a husky dog sleigh team through the frozen deserts of Iceland she is inappropriately dressed in a thin body-hugging woollen outfit.’
      • ‘The following month, she learned to mush dogs, and fell in love with the practice.’
      • ‘The driver harnesses up all the other dogs, mushing them ahead beyond sight of the sick dog, who is left howling in the snow for them not to leave him there, begging to join them in the harness so that he will not be a failure, without any purpose.’
      • ‘It feels as if I am the last man on earth as I mush my team of six race-trained Siberian huskies along the frozen lake Kuttijärvi.’
      • ‘The final child disappeared down the stairwell and Ms. Codd followed, screaming insults and mushing the children onward, offering a generous shove-in-the-back for any child who fell behind.’
      • ‘Since the sled could not carry all three of us, one person mushed the dog team while the remaining two skied behind on the trail.’

exclamation

  • A command urging on dogs pulling a sled during a journey across snow.

noun

  • A journey across snow with a dogsled.

    ‘a twelve-day mush’
    • ‘Some families play Monopoly, others watch TV - but one 17 year old and her family mush together.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: probably an alteration of French marchez! or marchons!, imperatives of marcher to advance.

Pronunciation:

mush

/məSH/

Main definitions of mush in English

: mush1mush2mush3

mush3

noun

British
informal
  • 1A person's mouth or face.

    • ‘People are going to know who I am because I'm on telly and in magazines and have my big mush plastered about everywhere.’
    • ‘And one part of unusual experience was the slapping of cold damp gherkins onto my mush.’
    • ‘The story starts here with a slap in the mush from some unsympathetic magistrate.’
    • ‘An infuriatingly overlong wait of 35 minutes was impatiently observed until your reviewer felt it necessary to tell the mush behind the bar to get the kitchen to get a move on.’
  • 2Used as a form of address.

    ‘what you doing here, mush?’

Origin

Mid 19th century: probably from Romany, man.

Pronunciation:

mush

/məSH/