Definition of Muscovite in English:

Muscovite

noun

  • 1A native or citizen of Moscow.

    • ‘The last year has proved to be the big breakthrough for the young Muscovite as he effortlessly moved onto the world stage.’
    • ‘He writes of the special triumph in seeing astonished Muscovites turn out to see the ‘Rockefeller Bank’ open a branch in Russia.’
    • ‘It was one of those hip new bars, catering to the young Muscovites who lived hard and fast.’
    • ‘The people of St Petersburg considered the Muscovites to be a trifle primitive, while the citizens of Moscow regarded St Petersburg society as slightly alien and vaguely suspect.’
    • ‘Leningrad will always be my alma mater, everything started for me there although I am very much a Muscovite now and a fully fledged feeling of the theatre came to me on the Moscow stage, the Bolshoi's stage.’
    • ‘City authorities have long been urging Muscovites to leave town over the weekend, as some parts of the city center as well as roads leading to the city's airports were blocked off and accessible only to people with special passes.’
    • ‘In the spring of 1813, the magazine published a letter from a Muscovite, who recounted the arrival of the French in Moscow, and the destruction of the city.’
    • ‘Given the low cost of living and low rates of general taxation, white collar Muscovites are approaching a western European level of disposable income.’
    • ‘Now, the wooden sheds he saw in the yards behind the buildings have given way to rows of steel carapaces, like small freight containers, under which Muscovites lock their cars.’
    • ‘Khmelnytsky sought help against the Poles in a treaty with Moscow in 1654, which was used as a pretext for occupation by the Muscovites.’
    • ‘The Muscovite's footwork sequences drew special applause from the audience and the judges awarded him 73.05 points.’
    • ‘The restaurant was a favorite of many Muscovites and frequent tourists who came to Red Square for the day.’
    • ‘A native Muscovite adds: ‘It's difficult to say why it's like this in Russia - are things this bad because the men drink or do they drink because things are this bad?’’
    • ‘He is a Muscovite by birth, the son of a Soviet mathematician economist.’
    • ‘Apparently, it's a particularly popular practice because Muscovites are renowned drink drivers, and alcohol taken in through a hookah won't show up if you get stopped by the police.’
    • ‘These have been decried by some architects, but an apartment with a view of one of these tiered wonders is a prized possession among Muscovites and expatriates.’
    • ‘Over the years, though, most Muscovites have found an effective way of combating the dog-day heat: they leave.’
    • ‘I'm a Muscovite myself and, of course, it's much easier to compete at home.’
    • ‘The Moscow school of dance is not too restrictive; it gives more freedom, therefore Muscovites allowed themselves to improvise, to move in a more uninhibited manner.’
    • ‘A step below this grandeur are restaurants that middle-class Muscovites enjoy on special occasions.’
    1. 1.1archaic A Russian.
      • ‘Shown here with his gift of humor displaced by a sense of national loss, he meditates dejectedly on the capture of the Polish border town of Smolensk by the Muscovites in 1514.’
      • ‘The outbreak of the Napoleonic Wars changed the fate of the British Muscovites.’
      • ‘Yet in the decades after World War II, Ukraine was arguably the most productive of the Soviet republics and Kiev was the provincial posting that Muscovites fought for.’

adjective

  • 1Relating to Moscow.

    • ‘The Muscovite audience was reportedly mystified; more progressive Americans, no doubt, will respond differently.’
    • ‘Like his father, he favoured the dumping of Muscovite architecture into St Petersburg's classical townscape; the more onion domes the better, even if long-established residents hated them.’
    • ‘His main subject matter is the life of Muscovite and provincial merchants and lower officialdom.’
    • ‘In contrast, her examination of the spirituality of Muscovite women finds that gender stereotypes helped shape women's religious experiences and piety.’
    • ‘Capitalising on the new wave of moneyed young Muscovite hipsters who can be seen at all the city's hot spots, the chic pair have brought us this chic café near the Bolshoi Theatre.’
    • ‘The Jewish community was under considerable strain, due partly to a sudden and unpopular influx of Polish Jews, who had escaped from the Muscovite and Cossack invasions of Poland.’
    • ‘The grand Principality of Moscow gained its independence from the Mongol Golden Horde in the fifteenth century under Ivan III, the Great, who vastly extended Muscovite territory.’
    • ‘In his world - the world of a Muscovite professional - this meant that the city's middle class has finally broken through the cocoon of insecurity; it started earning and spending money.’
    • ‘The nature of the relationship between the grand prince/tsar and his closest associates remains a central puzzle of Muscovite politics, despite centuries of discussion.’
    • ‘The Muscovite tsars rose to power during Mongol rule not by fighting the Golden Horde, but conspiring against other Russian princes.’
    • ‘During the first week of June, Muscovite fans flock to the shores of Lake Saimaa for an annual ballet fiesta that showcases the theater's most acclaimed productions.’
    • ‘Neither the Maori pa nor the Muscovite fort had an impact on forests similar to the Japanese castle-construction binge.’
    • ‘Because so many Muscovite car owners can't afford alarm systems - and because the city police are too busy palming bribes at traffic stops to hunt down criminals - the citizenry has begun to combat the problem on its own.’
    • ‘Rather, as was the case in so many Muscovite instances, such restrictions were first applied to members of what might be termed ‘the upper classes'.’
    • ‘Fighting for survival a piece down after some highly original play from his Muscovite opponent, Adams somehow managed to complicate the game at the crucial moment to escape with a draw.’
    • ‘And yet, he'd just been diagnosed with consumption, an illness that had shadowed him for years prompting doctors to exile him from the harsh Muscovite winters.’
    1. 1.1archaic Relating to Russia.

Origin

From modern Latin Muscovita, from Muscovia (see Muscovy).

Pronunciation:

Muscovite

/ˈməskəˌvīt/

Definition of muscovite in English:

muscovite

noun

  • A silver-gray form of mica occurring in many igneous and metamorphic rocks.

    • ‘This granulite consists of garnet, biotite, muscovite, quartz, plagioclase and cordierite.’
    • ‘Although biotite is capable of this, other minerals such as muscovite, garnet and cordierite are more efficient and preferentially occur in strongly peraluminous rocks.’
    • ‘The intervening host-rock layers are between 2 and 5 cm thick, being composed of biotite, sillimanite, garnet, muscovite, quartz and plagioclase.’
    • ‘They collected several pegmatite pockets in which topaz was associated with both clear and smoky quartz, microcline, albite, muscovite, fluorite, and cassiterite.’
    • ‘All monazite grains are located in the rock matrix, which consists of quartz, muscovite, biotite, epidote, chlorite, plagioclase, potassium feldspar and garnet with a granoblastic texture.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from obsolete Muscovy glass (in the same sense) + -ite.

Pronunciation:

muscovite

/ˈməskəˌvīt/