Main definitions of murid in English

: murid1murid2

murid1

noun

Zoology
  • A rodent of a very large family ("Muridae") that includes most kinds of rats, mice, and voles.

    • ‘These include the shrews, some moles, some bats, the striped skunk, the pinniped carnivores, toothed whales, the aardvark, and murid rodents.’
    • ‘Two prime examples of this are the murid rodents (Chinese vole, Norway rat, and house mouse) and the lagomorphs (rabbit, European hare, and pika).’
    • ‘Within rodents, relations are similar to those obtained and discussed previously, notably without any resolution of the relations between four main rodent lineages: murids, sciurids, glirids, and hystricognaths.’
    • ‘Around 1150 living species of murid rodents have been described, but surely many more remain to be discovered.’
    • ‘This work shows that five marsupials, two hedgehogs, a shrew, a mole, four mongoose, a raccoon, two mtistelids, and 15 rodents (including three sciurid and eight murid rodents) have some form of resistance to venom toxins.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from modern Latin Muridae (plural), based on Latin mus, mur- mouse.

Pronunciation:

murid

/ˈmyo͝orid/

Main definitions of murid in English

: murid1murid2

murid2

noun

  • 1A follower of a Muslim holy man, especially a Sufi disciple.

    • ‘With the devotee - master or disciple, shaykh or murid - we are made aware of a new and culturally salient perspective on music.’
    1. 1.1Murid A member of any of several Muslim movements, especially one that advocated rebellion against the Russians in the Caucasus in the late 19th century.
      • ‘The Murid Islamic Community in America held their annual Celebration of Sheikh Ahmadou Bamba Friday, July 28, 2000.’
      • ‘As Shamil's murids [adherents or partisans] continued to resist, Russian forces poured into the region, eventually capturing Shamil in 1859.’
      • ‘The Czar moved quickly to quell any other uprising, officially annexing the tribal heartlands and forcing thousands of murids, as well as entire clans, to flee to the Ottoman Empire.’

Origin

From Arabic murīd, literally he who desires.

Pronunciation:

murid

/ˈmyo͝orid/