Definition of moth-eaten in US English:

moth-eaten

adjective

  • 1Damaged or destroyed by moths.

    • ‘The musty, moth-eaten curtains, once a grand crimson, were now dull brown and drooping listlessly.’
    • ‘A four-poster bed with a slightly moth-eaten canopy lay in one corner, appearing as if it hadn't been used for many a night, and a table stood beside it.’
    • ‘But the room was almost empty except for 2 stools, a short table, a thin moth-eaten blanket, and an empty bookcase.’
    • ‘His mane is a little threadbare and Mum threatens to bin him calling him moth-eaten!’
    • ‘He covered her with the moth-eaten blankets and the stale smell of the room clung to the walls and to her.’
    • ‘These clothes were dirty, old, moth-eaten, and had been out of fashion for at least fifty years.’
    • ‘Inside, I would probably find nothing of interest: maybe some moth-eaten old clothes and someone's forgotten junk.’
    • ‘‘I think there's a story here,’ said Kelendom grinning as he sat down in a moth-eaten chair.’
    • ‘The tiny window on the wall to my right is covered by moth-eaten cream curtains (well, it looks like they were cream once but have since degraded through dust invasion and misuse to a light brown).’
    • ‘I was fascinated by a stall selling second-hand woolly hats, the kind favoured by old ladies, seized upon here by trendy teenagers who were wearing them with moth-eaten fur coats.’
    • ‘Mr. Monkey turns out to be a moth-eaten glove puppet.’
    • ‘We had a sheriff who played Santa Claus every year decked out in an unconvincing, moth-eaten, red suit.’
    • ‘Grunge has been a recurrent theme in fashion since the early 1990s, when rockers like Cobain transformed kilts, moth-eaten sweaters and lumberjack plaids into the insignia of yuppie revolt.’
    • ‘Needless to say, all of the interior was filled with dust and two or three large cobwebs were hanging from the corners, and all the remaining furniture was moth-eaten.’
    • ‘After the room was filled with the warmth of the cheery fire, I tossed the newspaper onto the moth-eaten sofa and sat down behind my desk to at last fill out the bills I'd neglected the day before.’
    • ‘Can a moth-eaten camelhair coat be repaired?’
    • ‘He wore a moth-eaten old fur cap and a shabby overcoat that was stretched tightly across his paunchy belly.’
    • ‘Your riches have rotted and your garments are moth-eaten.’
    • ‘When you think of seaside hotels, moth-eaten candlewick bedspreads and ferocious landladies usually come to mind.’
    • ‘Riley lay on his moth-eaten sofa, dead to the world.’
    1. 1.1 Old-fashioned and no longer appropriate or useful.
      • ‘Looking back at me was the late Bill Rose, grumpier and more moth-eaten than I remembered.’
      • ‘I've made this guy look cheerful, when actually he's pensive and moth-eaten and sad.’
      • ‘If you enter any big library, in one corner of it, some age-worn, moth-eaten books may greet you.’
      • ‘Perhaps I just feel sorry for those whose slightly moth-eaten faces do not fit any more.’
      • ‘This is such moth-eaten economics it ought to be discarded.’
      • ‘Only occasionally does someone throw a handful of change into his moth-eaten guitar case, something he doesn't always bother to leave out.’
      • ‘Archie performs his moth-eaten variety act before dwindling audiences in dog-eared music hall theatres.’
      • ‘It's certainly true that students retain a strange willingness to welcome back the moth-eaten cultural icons of the Eighties.’
      • ‘That is not to be, as in this moth-eaten tale of an honest cop versus the criminal underworld, there is nothing we have not seen and been weary of in the past.’
      • ‘Indeed, in the flesh he has more than a passing resemblance to a slightly moth-eaten circus lion.’
      • ‘In the Members Hall, the pictures of former Prime Ministers, Speakers and Presidents of the Senate have been taken down - but the real concern is over the moth-eaten Leader of the Opposition.’
      • ‘There was a shoddy wooden control tower, with a moth-eaten windsock and several obsolete instruments on it.’
      • ‘Yeah, cos the map got a little moth-eaten and I have to navigate through the blank patches.’
      • ‘As she buried herself under the thin, moth-eaten sheets, she knew it was no use trying to sleep, she had two hours of it in the carriage, and the way Zacharias was noisily rummaging through his suitcase wasn't helping.’
      • ‘We sit in the moth-eaten upstairs lounge overlooking the St Helen's ground, with the surf pounding the adjacent beach.’
      • ‘Why is he skulking around in moth-eaten academia anyway?’
      threadbare, worn out, well worn, worn, old, shabby, scruffy, decrepit, tattered, ragged, holey, frayed, mangy, unkempt
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Pronunciation

moth-eaten

/ˈmɔθˌitn//ˈmôTHˌētn/