Main definitions of morph in English

: morph1morph2

morph1

verb

  • 1Change smoothly from one image to another by small gradual steps using computer animation techniques.

    with object ‘3-D objects can be morphed into other objects’
    • ‘In between are funny images of various world leaders morphing into monkeys, devils or pigs.’
    • ‘Right before my eyes she was morphing into the girl I had first met.’
    • ‘Mortis knew she was caught when the small cat smoothly morphed into a woman.’
    • ‘It shows a kite morphing into a ship that sails from a river to the sea and changes into a magnificent galleon, then back into a kite.’
    • ‘It looks to me like this silliness is rather quickly morphing into being both destructive and self-defeating.’
    • ‘The solution was a special effect known as morphing, in which the transitions are visually seamless.’
    • ‘But what was once a sleepy Bohemian beach town is rapidly morphing into an upscale resort destination.’
    • ‘The screen gets all blurry; when it clears up, the chimp has morphed into a man in a cheap gorilla suit.’
    • ‘Disgusted with his mother's affairs, Walt is dangerously close to morphing into a younger version of his father.’
    • ‘The image morphed to show a snow covered street, facing some kind of large store.’
    • ‘Beautifully filmed, it opens in slow motion on windswept dunes before morphing into shots of an inner-city house.’
    • ‘The system is morphing faster than the program can track, but I'm eliminating the unnecessary code strings.’
    • ‘Art changes as it develops, sometimes morphing into shapes almost unrecognizable from its origins.’
    • ‘They were no longer the shape of humans, but had been morphed into huge indescribable creatures.’
    • ‘It started out as a thriller, morphed into action and towards the end tried to be a comedy.’
    • ‘The video shows the portraits from the wall seamlessly morphing into an unending and hypnotic sequence of heads.’
    • ‘He has morphed a quirky novel into an enthralling, tender and, crucially, fun piece of cinema.’
    • ‘The child smirked, morphing in a blink to a tall dark-haired man.’
    • ‘Suddenly his face morphs completely and he bursts out laughing.’
    • ‘Within the space of a few pages, the comedian morphs from an ambitious, uncaring party animal into a remorseful, spiritual outcast.’
    1. 1.1 Undergo or cause to undergo a gradual process of transformation.
      no object ‘the cute moppet has morphed into the moody moll of the indie world’

noun

  • 1An image that has been morphed by computer animation.

    • ‘The sounds ushering from the two morphs on the screen weren't any better, though, and he couldn't block those out.’
    • ‘The digital morph can also play an important role in the sound dimension of the text.’
    1. 1.1 An instance of morphing an image.
      • ‘But, you know, I would play the entire action, that the other actor did, so that they could choose when and where, in post-production, the morph was going to start.’
      • ‘I expect if I was at school now I would be doing the project on the PC and could create an animation in which the morph occurs in one fluid movement.’
      • ‘There's some stunning works, and an intriguing computer morph that shows how depictions of the Lord's face have changed over time.’
      • ‘A discrete morph can be thought of as an animation starting from the initial object and ending with the final object after a given number of the intermediate objects.’
      • ‘Loop format is especially suitable in the case of the author using digital morphs to program a text so that it progresses from one verse to another.’

Origin

1990s: element from metamorphosis.

Pronunciation

morph

/môrf//mɔrf/

Main definitions of morph in English

: morph1morph2

morph2

noun

  • 1Linguistics
    An actual linguistic form.

    ‘the present participle in English is always the morph “-ing.”’
    • ‘When it deals with morphs and morphemes, morphology is known as morphemics.’
  • 2Biology
    Each of several variant forms of an animal or plant.

    • ‘Juveniles are gray or white, with the white morph more common.’
    • ‘The four females seen mating during two nesting attempts all remated with the same morph.’
    • ‘Analysis of heterochronic processes associated with sexual dimorphism requires the arbitrary choice of a reference morph in the dimorphic pair.’
    • ‘In some cases, variation in reproductive strategies has led to alternative queen morphs.’
    • ‘Starch was not detected in the pollen of any morph.’

Origin

1940s: from Greek morphē ‘form’.

Pronunciation

morph

/mɔrf//môrf/