Definition of mores in English:

mores

plural noun

  • The essential or characteristic customs and conventions of a community.

    ‘an offense against social mores’
    • ‘The readers' actions would be governed by the social mores through which they are conditioned.’
    • ‘This demonstrates that the institution of marriage itself is not remaining outdated but is changing with the mores of society.’
    • ‘Changes in family structures and social mores may affect attitudes toward violence.’
    • ‘There are certain social mores that last no matter what the ideology of the current administration.’
    • ‘For me, the Indian dress, food, wedding customs, and mores seemed close to home.’
    • ‘They adopt the mores and conventions of the society into which they are assimilating.’
    • ‘The Vikings left an indelible mark on the mores and traditions of Shetlanders as well as on their psyche.’
    • ‘The criminal sanction operates then as a form of social control both punishing the offender and reasserting the mores of that society.’
    • ‘These teens are the least rebellious of all the groups, conforming to the mores of local society.’
    • ‘He is Canadian, but like most of us, he has ties elsewhere, with a different culture and social mores.’
    • ‘Are social mores and attitudes towards sexual education changing adequately?’
    • ‘Factors such as the liberality of the family and adherence to social mores influence reaction and tolerance.’
    • ‘Cultural mores emphasize learning by watching, not necessarily by explicit teaching.’
    • ‘He is mostly concerned with the social mores of Harvard students and his own place in the campus culture.’
    • ‘Women have full access to education, and social mores and attitudes are changing gradually.’
    • ‘The play explores the changing social and sexual mores of the three decades.’
    • ‘She adds to the interest of her subject by explaining mores and customs of the age.’
    • ‘The film also makes us focus on our social mores as we watch the film's tribe.’
    • ‘The professional army was in danger of separating itself from society, of developing its own mores and thus its own politics.’
    • ‘Democracy and schooling promoted egalitarian mores and well-nigh universal literacy.’
    customs, conventions, ways, way of life, way of doing things, traditions, practices, custom and practice, procedures, habits, usages
    praxis
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: from Latin, plural of mos, mor- custom.

Pronunciation:

mores

/ˈmôrāz/