Main definitions of mop in English

: mop1mop2

mop1

noun

  • 1An implement consisting of a sponge or a bundle of thick loose strings attached to a handle, used for wiping floors or other surfaces.

    • ‘I stopped in the kitchen and spread some water in the center of the floor, pushing it around with my mop.’
    • ‘I jump back into reality, dipping my mop again and swirling the water around on the dirty floor.’
    • ‘Sara got a mop out of the hall closet and began to clean up the water.’
    • ‘For a full minute, the only sound was the swish of the mop against the tiled floor.’
    • ‘When you wash your floors, use two sponge mops - one to clean the first time, the other to rinse.’
    • ‘One way of removing built up floor wax manually, is to mix detergent and ammonia with water and apply to the floor with a mop or sponge.’
    • ‘First use the duster, then use a wet mop to wipe the floor.’
    • ‘Mop the floor with cleaner, squeeze the mop as dry as possible, then use the clear rinse water’
    • ‘She grabbed the mop and bucket and swabbed down the deck in record time, determined to be the best pirate of all time.’
    • ‘She'd left armed with two powdered cleansers, three different liquids, a spray, and assorted brushes, sponges, buckets, and mops.’
    • ‘The woman went into the kitchen and got a mop and bucket out of a cabinet.’
    • ‘Use a second cloth or a dry mop to wipe the floor dry.’
    • ‘And surfaces dry much quicker than when they are swabbed down with wet mops, reducing the risk of slips and falls.’
    • ‘I stomp into the house in my muddy boots without considering that my mother will have to fetch a mop and bucket and clean up after me.’
    • ‘Use a mop or sponge with warm water and a general all-purpose cleaner.’
    • ‘I simply took the mop and bucket and started to clean up the mess without a word.’
    • ‘Wash with clear water, a mild detergent, and a clean mop.’
    • ‘Vacuum after each sanding, and then go over the floor with a damp mop to remove all the dust.’
    • ‘She quickly mopped the floor, went downstairs to put the mop back in the kitchen, and head upstairs to her room.’
    • ‘Rinse again with a clean mop and just plain cool water.’
    sponge, swab, squeegee
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A thick mass of disordered hair.
      ‘her tousled mop of blonde hair’
      • ‘He was standing with his back to me, but from this angle, he appeared to have a very nice tan, as well as a shaggy mop of golden blonde hair.’
      • ‘Duff stopped and turned, stared at it, then ran his fingers through an unruly mop of hair.’
      • ‘He had a mop of messy blonde hair and strong green eyes.’
      • ‘A mop of golden blonde hair covering a young male face greeted her curious eyes.’
      • ‘He has a mop of brown hair and a lightly freckled face, and is still very much a boy in body, if not mind.’
      • ‘A tall woman with a mop of curly blonde hair and huge owl glasses poked her head out.’
      • ‘Upon entry into this world the delivery nurse was apparently so taken with the copious mop of curly locks attached to the puny infant that she got the name wrong on the birth certificate.’
      • ‘She tried to brush my matted mop in the morning before she sent me to pre-school.’
      • ‘Rusty ran a hand through his tangled mop of hair and grimaced.’
      • ‘He had light blue eyes, a freckled face and a mop of bright blonde hair atop his head.’
      • ‘Her pale face expressed utter exhaustion beneath the tangled mop of brown hair.’
      • ‘She was a tall, slender woman with an artfully tousled mop of shiny blonde hair.’
      • ‘Her hair was a mop of red curls, streaked through with dark blonde.’
      • ‘She tossed her small mop of blonde hair, and then yawned widely and leaned onto Aaron's chest.’
      • ‘I am also intelligent, witty and have a large mop of thick blonde hair that controls itself.’
      • ‘He was young and tanned with a floppy mop of hair under his helmet.’
      • ‘I sat down on the chair and wondered if there was any point in trying to make my unruly mop of hair behave.’
      • ‘Then I saw the mop of frizzy blonde hair, and a flash of red lipstick as she took a glance out of the window.’
      • ‘His eyes were a deep emerald green and his hair was a mop of thick black curls.’
      • ‘Her blonde hair was a mop of curls framing her round childish face dominated by large brown eyes.’
      shock, mane, thatch, tangle, mass, mat
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    2. 1.2in singular An act of wiping something clean, especially a floor.
      ‘the kitchen needed a quick mop’
      • ‘Give them clear instructions and make sure that they stay around after guests have gone to help remove rubbish and to give the floor a mop.’
      • ‘There is a broom, dust pan, mop at the camp for your use - please sweep the floor and give it a mop.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Clean or soak up (something) by wiping.

    ‘he was mopping his plate with a piece of bread’
    • ‘During his four-month stay in the hospital, he claimed cleaners failed to mop floors and clean basins and furniture.’
    • ‘An elderly man who had been mopping around the counter looked up from his tedious chore and smiled at whoever had walked in.’
    • ‘After filling the drinking water, I had to wash utensils, wash two buckets of clothes, sweep and mop the entire house.’
    • ‘When cooked, leave to stand for 15 minutes to cool a little, then serve in bowls with boiled or mashed potatoes, for mopping up the juices.’
    • ‘He mopped himself up and then burst into tears again.’
    • ‘Contract cleaners offer a very efficient service and will do a lot more than empty the trash cans and sweep and mop the floor.’
    • ‘She simply walked up and down the floor silently, then picked up a cloth and mopped the blood from the floor.’
    • ‘A cleaner mopped the floor of the place I was staying in Greece.’
    • ‘Startled, Andrew looked up at the clock and realized he had spent forty minutes sweeping and mopping, and he had been mopping the same spot for the past ten minutes.’
    • ‘So I spent the next half hour mopping the kitchen floor.’
    • ‘I had to mop the marble lobby floors that morning, and got right to work, hoping that I would not have to see Tom.’
    • ‘I even break off some thick crusty white bread and mop up the excess olive oil.’
    • ‘Laundry is done, windows are washed, refrigerator clean, pantry stocked, linens washed, floors mopped, shower scrubbed, and fresh flowers on the table.’
    • ‘She swept and mopped the living room, and then knocked on the bedroom door.’
    • ‘You can use all that exercise after walking to and from work, emptying the trash, washing the giant picture windows, and mopping the dining room.’
    • ‘Once I had wrung my clothes out, mopped the walls and soaked up as much as I could from the carpet it didn't look too bad…’
    • ‘The women at baby group were talking about how they mopped their kitchen floors daily.’
    • ‘Robyn took a deep breath and then slowly continued on her present mission in retrieving the rouge mop which she immediately returned to the janitor who politely thanked her and began mopping the place he had just been scrubbing.’
    • ‘They seem to do little all day other than to mop the changing room floors, pin yet more bits of paper to the notice board and sit by the pool side toying with the red ribbons tied to their whistles.’
    • ‘Two men busily scrubbed dingy, white plastic chairs, while another mopped soapy water off the tiled floor.’
    wash, clean, wipe, swab, sponge, squeegee
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Wipe (something) away from a surface.
      ‘a barmaid rushed forward to mop up the spilled beer’
      • ‘Her face burning, Rena sits back down once the waiter finishes mopping up the tablecloth.’
      • ‘Joe's children's mess can be swept, hoovered or mopped from its surface.’
      • ‘Immediately she was on her knees with a rag, mopping up the spilled Cuervo.’
      • ‘Then I noticed Bill mopping at a slight drip from under the rear left wheel arch.’
      • ‘I don't know where the time went, but before long it was 10, and then 11 and the barman was calling time, collecting up glasses and mopping the tables.’
      • ‘Muttering under his breath, he gets a sponge from the kitchen and starts mopping up the wine from the table before it can spill onto the floor.’
      • ‘She grabs some hand towels from the changing room, and mops up most of the blood.’
      • ‘I ripped a paper towel from the roll, mopping up the mess I had made.’
    2. 1.2 Wipe sweat or tears from (one's face or eyes)
      ‘he pulled a handkerchief from his pocket to mop his brow’
      • ‘He apologized for the sweat he continually mopped from his forehead.’
      • ‘‘Splendid little creature,’ gasped Mr Griffiths, mopping his brow once more.’
      • ‘Satisfied, she backed away and mopped tears and mascara from her cheeks, still pouting.’
      • ‘He gave a weary, embarrassed chuckle and mopped at his face.’
      • ‘Then he started to sweat profusely, mopping at his face and neck with a large red handkerchief.’
      • ‘But it was hard work out there in the heat although Woods was working hard, occasionally mopping his perspiring brow with a towel.’
      • ‘The groom is seen mopping his brow with a handkerchief.’
      • ‘Lifting an arm, Hoss mopped sweat from his brow.’
      • ‘As we ascended, the whole oval pan of the Mamund Valley spread out behind us, and pausing to mop my brow, I sat on a rock and surveyed it.’
      • ‘Each quiz answer now sounded like part of a comedy sketch as we answered the previous question, by the end I was mopping my eyes, weeping with helpless laughter.’
      • ‘In addition to wiping down gym equipment, use a separate towel to mop the sweat from your brow to minimize the chance of picking up a respiratory infection.’
      • ‘As you mop your brow and apply your sunscreen, think snow, think plunging temperatures, think ice sculptures.’
      • ‘Dave pulled a handkerchief from his pocket and mopped at his face.’
      • ‘As it happens, summer mounted a last minute insurrection and the day was unreasonably hot, with everyone dressed for the wrong season and mopping their brows.’
      • ‘She stopped and mopped sweat from her forehead, looking up at the bright sun above them, wishing a cloud or something would pass over it, for only a second of relief.’
      • ‘They would mop his brow and place wine and bread to his parched lips and inform him he was awake.’
      • ‘He sighed, and used his hand and sleeve to mop his brow, which was now dripping with sweat.’
      • ‘‘Thank you mum,’ he says, mopping his brow in mock relief.’
      wipe up, clean up, soak up, absorb, sop up, sponge up
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Phrasal Verbs

  • mop something up (also mop up)

    • Complete the military conquest of an area by capturing or killing remaining enemy troops.

      ‘troops mopped up the last pockets of resistance’
      • ‘Remnants of the Taliban are still active in areas along the border with Pakistan, and U.S. forces are trying to mop them up.’
      • ‘The smaller ones have been mopped up and the merger is seen as a clear signal of the need to create a big company to go after the bigger opportunities waiting to be picked off.’
      • ‘Keating led that journey with the vision, lost touch with those he wished to serve, and Howard was there to mop it up.’
      • ‘People think that we can mop up the problem if we throw more money at it.’
      • ‘It would appear as though the military is prepared to mop up the trouble makers and those that lead them.’
      finish off, deal with, make an end of, dispose of, account for, take care of, clear up, eliminate, dispatch
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 15th century: perhaps ultimately related to Latin mappa ‘napkin’.

Pronunciation

mop

/mäp//mɑp/

Main definitions of mop in English

: mop1mop2

mop2

(also mop fair)

noun

British
historical
  • An autumn fair or gathering at which farmhands and servants were hired.

    • ‘It's believed the modern mop fairs, two huge fun fairs, held in October carry on a tradition started with hiring fairs when labourers and domestic workers were hired for the year.’
    • ‘Among the recollections are the mop and sheep fairs, the railway, the cinema and children's games, like playing with hoops along the High Street.’
    • ‘The High Street will be closed again from 10 am tomorrow when the fair ground rides move in again for the second mop fair.’
    • ‘Combine these closures with the mop fair in the autumn and businesses are beginning to lose margins that can never be regained.’

Origin

Late 17th century: probably from the practice at the fair whereby a mop was carried by a maidservant seeking employment.

Pronunciation

mop

/mäp//mɑp/