Main definitions of moor in English

: moor1moor2

moor1

noun

  • 1A tract of open uncultivated upland; a heath.

    • ‘I was dreaming of gardens of primrose and moors covered with heather and cottages with honeysuckle over the door.’
    • ‘Also expect a varied landscape with gentle green hills in the south, and more rugged mountains and moors in the north.’
    • ‘The heather on the moors was in full bloom and although there was an autumnal edge to the air the day was almost perfect.’
    • ‘Summer ended and the moors were soon covered with snow.’
    • ‘The moors are a huge open, treeless upland area covered in heather whose purple flowers can be seen from space when they bloom in late August.’
    • ‘Childhood trips to the east coast weren't complete unless my little brother and I caught a glimpse of the steam train across the heather moors.’
    • ‘This is fabulous walking country, a land of far horizons and rare tranquillity with vast areas of rounded hills and heather moors.’
    • ‘I move the bees to the heather on the moors when it flowers in August.’
    • ‘From last Sunday, parts of England introduced open access to the moors with some 80 per cent of the newly available land made up of rare heather moorland.’
    • ‘On the open moor, skylarks were in the nesting season; I saw several at close range, and heard them overhead almost without ceasing.’
    • ‘The hamlet is home to about 30 people who take their drinking water from a spring high on the moors above the valley - a source used for centuries.’
    • ‘Small streams are common on many moors and upper river catchment areas.’
    • ‘This wide extent of habitats includes upland moors, grassy or boggy open areas in forests and damp grasslands and traditionally managed hayfields particularly in river valleys.’
    • ‘Its landscape of mountains, rugged cliffs, lakes, moors, beaches and bays are ideal for a week's swimming, canoeing, boating, fishing and walking.’
    • ‘What right have we to deny our children and grandchildren the right to enjoy the hills, dales and moors as we have done?’
    • ‘Tonight again snow falls on the mountains and moors.’
    • ‘The open moors and heaths were another source for other varieties of plants, especially berries, as well as providing areas for sheep and goat grazing.’
    • ‘Judges said his farm was in a beautiful location, with an impressive mix of open moor, meadows and other pasture.’
    • ‘Hills, valleys, moors, and forests across the whole of the British Isles provided varying resources for local human communities.’
    • ‘More than 300 hectares of moorland will be replanted to restore the moors to their natural beauty.’
    upland, moorland, heath, plateau
    fell, wold
    grouse moor
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A tract of open land preserved for shooting.
      ‘a grouse moor’
      • ‘Some of the birds are being ‘evicted’ because the famous moor has become over-stocked since shooting was banned in 1997.’
      • ‘Grouse-shooting on the Yorkshire moors on the Glorious Twelfth the following day would be cautious, with landowners anxious to preserve stocks.’
      • ‘Game keepers keep predators in check and manage the moors to preserve habitats of many species which are in sharp decline nationally, research suggests.’
      • ‘In his early days he fished the river and followed the groups on the bogs but as he grew older his attitude to these sports changed and in later years often bemoaned the absence of the grouse's cackle on the moors in the autumn evenings.’
      • ‘Shooters traditionally look forward to August 12, when they dust off their guns and head for the moors for the start of the grouse shooting season.’
      • ‘Thousands of shooters will pour on to moors across Britain for the Glorious Twelfth, the traditional start of the grouse-shooting season.’
      • ‘Goathland was popular with wealthy visitors from the West Riding who came for grouse shooting, walks on the moors and the golf course, which was then laid out on the village green, with drives across many of the roads.’
    2. 1.2US dialect A fen.

Origin

Old English mōr, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

moor

/mo͝or/

Main definitions of moor in English

: moor1moor2

moor2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Make fast (a boat) by attaching it by cable or rope to the shore or to an anchor.

    ‘twenty or so fishing boats were moored to the pier’
    • ‘Mr Foley said the accommodation complex had an added attraction for boat owners who would be able to moor their vessels close to home.’
    • ‘The only sign of civilisation was an ancient taverna wedged on the rocks, and so we moored the boat and headed in for lunch.’
    • ‘There is also a place for sailing enthusiasts to moor their boats.’
    • ‘The first phase of the development, a 50-berth marina, will provide a safe and secure area for boat-owners to moor their vessels all year round.’
    • ‘He sees a market for Americans to moor their boats in Mexico year round as well as transient boaters.’
    • ‘The crew moors the boat and everyone goes ashore to a restaurant set up under palm trees with rough tables and benches.’
    • ‘If you have a boat, moor it securely or move it to a designated safe place.’
    • ‘The missing man had been a regular customer at the pub since he first moored his boat at Avoncliff a week before.’
    • ‘In this event the expedition will haul up the boat on shore or moor it in a safe bay, and then trek to the nearest settlement or air-strip.’
    • ‘On the foredeck lies a large anchor with a coil of rope for mooring the boat.’
    • ‘Similar licences were granted to a number of individual owners to place moorings and to moor boats at various locations in the same general area.’
    • ‘They said the new pier requires additional lighting to make it reasonably safe for them to moor their vessels.’
    • ‘The group will meet Cromarty Firth Port Authority later this month to discuss options for mooring the vessel.’
    • ‘New homes overlook the seafront, and there are hundreds of boats moored in the marina that is the envy of every other seaside resort in Britain.’
    • ‘Greece offers a number of popular destinations for mooring your yacht.’
    • ‘Some huge liners towered over other smaller boats, and there were also a few Navy ships moored a bit further out.’
    • ‘It submitted an application in September to build a floating pontoon, which would allow it to moor boats.’
    • ‘Some members have purchased their own boats and the club staff helps to wash, repair and look after the maintenance of all the boats moored at the marina.’
    • ‘When conditions are good I like to make a day of it, mooring the boat in front of the lighthouse and climbing ashore with a picnic or even a barbecue between dives.’
    • ‘There is enough space at the venue for 550 limousines, quay space to moor yachts and a heli-pad nearby.’
    tie up, secure, make fast, fix firmly, fasten, anchor, berth, dock
    lash, hitch
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object](of a boat) be made fast by mooring.
      [no object] ‘we moored alongside a jetty’

Origin

Late Middle English: probably from the Germanic base of Dutch meren.

Pronunciation:

moor

/mo͝or/

Main definitions of moor in English

: moor1moor2

Moor

noun

  • A member of a northwestern African Muslim people of mixed Berber and Arab descent. In the 8th century they conquered the Iberian peninsula, but were finally driven out of their last stronghold in Granada at the end of the 15th century.

    • ‘The coastal belt south of Oporto has been producing wine since Portugal gained independence from the Moors in the 10th century.’
    • ‘Muslims (in particular Moors from Spain) may well have been among the early explorers.’
    • ‘The Moors ruled all of Spain for three centuries, and Andalusia until nearly 1500.’
    • ‘The Moors invaded Spain in the eighth century, and much of the Spanish language derives from Arabic.’
    • ‘So Leonardo grew up with a North African education under the Moors and later travelled extensively around the Mediterranean coast.’
    • ‘Andalucia is where the Moors first set foot in Spain and remained the longest, until their eventual expulsion from Cadiz in 1262.’
    • ‘The Moors infused an exotic orientalism into Spanish culture which exercised a deep influence even after their final expulsion in the 15th century.’
    • ‘From the Arabs and Moors come stuffed vegetables and the use of dried fruits and pine nuts.’
    • ‘This is the oldest quarter of Granada, the haven to which the Moors fled when the Christians conquered the city, and for centuries it was the poorest.’
    • ‘The North African tribes who conquered Spain were commonly known as Moors.’
    • ‘Spain does not deny its occupation by the Muslim Moors.’
    • ‘He adds that the town of Tekrur was a market where the Moors exchanged wool, glass and copper for slaves and gold.’
    • ‘Gibraltar was besieged, in 1309, and retaken from the Moors by Alonzo de Guzman.’
    • ‘In 711 the Moors invaded Spain and conquered it in five years.’
    • ‘His dynastic heritage was firmly based on the intolerant expulsion of both the Jews and the Moors from Spain in 1492.’
    • ‘When the Moors conquered most of the known world in the eighth century, they used a special technique to aid their cause.’

Origin

From Old French More, via Latin from Greek Mauros inhabitant of Mauretania.

Pronunciation:

Moor

/mo͝or/