Definition of moon in English:

moon

noun

  • 1The natural satellite of the earth, visible (chiefly at night) by reflected light from the sun.

    • ‘I look out over the docks again and watch the bright moon in the sky.’
    • ‘The Sun is in fact very much larger than the Moon, but it is also very much further away.’
    • ‘At the top of the page was a sketch of the phases the moon went through each month.’
    • ‘The force exerted by the Moon on the Earth is having a similar effect on the Earth's rotation.’
    • ‘Eclipses of the sun and the moon occur every six months.’
    • ‘Jews count the months by the moon; western civilization patterns its calendar after the sun.’
    • ‘The waxing Moon was three-quarters full and too high and too far to the south to shine into the kitchen.’
    • ‘There was no sign of the Moon but the odd star managed to look down through gaps in the belts of cloud.’
    • ‘We sat there talking under the stars until the Moon slipped beneath the circle of trees.’
    • ‘The Moon is the Earth's only natural satellite.’
    • ‘Gravity pulls the Earth around the Sun, and the Moon around the Earth, and it causes tides.’
    • ‘If you calculate back a billion and a half years ago, the moon would have been in direct contact with the earth.’
    • ‘The 15th day of the eighth month, when the moon is round and clear, is the middle of autumn.’
    • ‘He looked to the sky, seeing a pale full moon visible behind a patch of clouds.’
    • ‘The moon came up four hours ago, huge and the colour of a malfunctioning striplight on an office ceiling.’
    • ‘Finally, the moon has been judged to be the cause of madness, the term ‘lunacy’ deriving from the Latin luna, meaning moon.’
    • ‘The stars are there and of course with the naked eye the Moon is also often visible.’
    • ‘It also gives a method to determine longitude based on eclipses of the Moon.’
    • ‘The nation is remembering the moment a human being first set foot on the moon 35 years ago.’
    • ‘The night was freezing cold, and the full moon was shining through the window.’
    satellite
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A natural satellite of any planet.
      • ‘Spacecraft have flown by every major planet, and most of their important moons, in the solar system.’
      • ‘As the science of robotics advances, the search for resources and signs of life on distant planets and moons will be carried out increasingly by rovers and other robots.’
      • ‘Once it enters orbit, it will begin a four-year scientific tour of the planet and its moons.’
      • ‘Telescopes on the ground, as well as the Hubble Space Telescope, have also discovered small moons around these planets.’
      • ‘It happens that Mars has two moons, named Phobos and Deimos, which are captured asteroids orbiting very close to that planet.’
      • ‘Of all the moons circling all the planets in the solar system, only Saturn's moon, Titan, is known to have an atmosphere.’
      • ‘Two small moons, Phobos and Deimos, were discovered orbiting Mars in 1877.’
      • ‘Modern interplanetary spacecraft explore their target planets and moons with the aid of robots, and these robots are also becoming very small.’
      • ‘Other planets and moons in the solar system have been volcanically active in the distant past.’
      • ‘Outer space was a vivacious place, filled with planets and stars, moons and black holes, supernovas and asteroid belts.’
      • ‘Orbiting Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft is set to release a probe that will travel to one of the planet's moons, Titan.’
      • ‘But what about the geologies of the nine planets and over sixty moons of the solar system?’
      • ‘The satellites or the two moons of Mars - Phobos and Deimos - are seen revolving around it.’
      • ‘The main objective is to enhance our understanding of the Solar System by exploring the planets, their moons, and small bodies, such as comets and asteroids.’
      • ‘He discovered moons orbiting Jupiter.’
      • ‘He discovered moons orbiting the planet Jupiter.’
      • ‘He also discovered four moons: Titania and Oberon at Uranus, and Enceladus and Mimas at Saturn.’
      • ‘Observational astronomers use telescopes, on Earth and in space, to study objects ranging from planets and moons to distant galaxies.’
      • ‘The moons of the outer planets in the solar system are also rich with various kinds of ices.’
      • ‘Over many millions of years, the matter within our solar system has coalesced into many moons, nine planets and the star that we call the sun.’
      satellite
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    2. 1.2humorous, literary A month.
      ‘many moons had passed since he brought a prospective investor home’
      • ‘Many moons ago I had a landlady who claimed to remember the days when the road through Bilsdale was no more than a rough track.’
      • ‘Many moons ago, actually about 24 years to the day, I was very nearly run down by a bus.’
      • ‘The fight from a few moons ago had gained me some respect, if not that much.’
      • ‘Many moons ago, I had a friend who repaired electronics for a living.’
      • ‘Many moons ago it seems now, dental treatment and glasses were all free to everyone but now unless ur still at school or are unemployed you have to pay for it!’
      • ‘Many moons ago, a Spanish football team travelled to the Olympic Games in Belgium, where they acquitted themselves well, winning many fans.’
      • ‘Many moons ago, though, the monument was a landmark for travellers heading to Worsley Village.’
      • ‘She had gotten cut on the thigh in a practice session, but that had been six moons ago and the wound had not been so deep as to not be able to heal quickly and fully.’
      • ‘Regulars will recall that many a moon ago we had a cryptic clue competition which was won by a gentleman caller called Keir.’
      • ‘Or would they sing that song that they did sing together all those moons ago.’
      • ‘Many moons ago, I worked for a business association.’
      • ‘So other than the lower interest rates, why are we clamouring to buy what we shunned just a few moons ago?’
      • ‘Many moons ago I wrote about the trials and tribulations of shooting a commercial calendar.’
      • ‘Tendron had heard all about the incident with Sir Jacob Swift - was it only six moons ago?’
      a long time ago, ages ago, years ago
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    3. 1.3the moon Anything that one could desire.
      ‘you must know he'd give any of us the moon’
      • ‘I wouldn't lay down on that thing even if you promised me the moon.’
      • ‘Politicians and lovers are both inclined to offer you the moon, but both might eventually do nothing more than use you and leave you for scrap.’
      • ‘They want someone who can give you the moon if you desired it, it's what I want for you, what you deserve.’

verb

  • 1no object , with adverbial Behave or move in a listless and aimless manner.

    ‘lying in bed eating candy, mooning around’
    • ‘His talent at piloting was uncanny and he had spent his time mooning about the docks, watching the skimmers.’
    • ‘I spent at least a year mooning around before Darren had told me to snap out of it.’
    • ‘And she's mooning around with old love-letters instead of putting herself to good use.’
    • ‘And yep, you got it right, up till now, he was still mooning around because of Sandara.’
    • ‘She is still mooning about in that motel room, but she does that you know.’
    waste time, fiddle, loaf, idle, mope, drift, stooge around
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Act in a dreamily infatuated manner.
      ‘Timothy's mooning over her like a schoolboy’
      • ‘Haley lets out a small sigh, ‘What you just described would be mooning or pining, not to mention pathetic.’’
      • ‘The afternoon was their own, and most soldiers spent their free time mooning over the girl at the tavern.’
      • ‘My best friend's oblivious to everything, mooning over some guy.’
      • ‘Kim's second-best friend Sharon is still mooning over Shane.’
      • ‘He felt like one of those idiots in a chick flick mooning over the movie's lead.’
      • ‘Anne is now officially ‘loved up’ with the bloke she has been mooning over for 4 years.’
      • ‘Including spending most of my teenage years mooning over a guy who never even knew my name.’
      • ‘However he just couldn't help spending a lot of time mooning over the situation.’
      • ‘I don't want my employees looking like lovesick schoolgirls mooning over a cute hunk.’
      • ‘Having Walter mooning over her and being frustrated was gratifying in a selfish way.’
      • ‘She would spend most of the night mooning over Jake anyway.’
      • ‘I was getting sick of them mooning over each other.’
      • ‘Just when Michele pledged to get on with her life and stop mooning for her mechanical engineer, out of the blue he asked her out for dinner and proposed.’
      • ‘I was thinking of getting engaged to Barry, but I saw less and less of him and mooned over John.’
      • ‘She finally quit mooning over Terrie, and she and John are now going steady.’
      • ‘He, of course, was soaking it all in and enjoying the way they mooned over him.’
      • ‘She turns up on a transfer, starts acing every assignment, acts modest about it and never seems to do any extra work, and you're playing racquetball with her and mooning after her whenever she heads off on a date with Donnie.’
      • ‘Why was he mooning over a girl that he hardly knew?’
      • ‘It's kinda hard when you see your husband mooning over a stupid blonde.’
      • ‘In 1993, she hung around tennis courts mooning after Andre Agassi.’
      mope, pine, languish, brood, daydream, fantasize, be in a reverie, be in a brown study
      View synonyms
  • 2informal no object Expose one's buttocks to (someone) in order to insult or amuse them.

    ‘Dan had whipped around, bent over, and mooned the crowd’
    • ‘You may remember two or three years ago Howard he his pants down and mooned the camera and the audience.’
    • ‘Of course, some people point out that this idea is coming from a mayor who has a habit of mooning crowds at speaking engagements, frequently dresses up in a giant carrot suit and got married on top of an elephant.’
    • ‘He famously mooned a referee, threw a shoe at a baseline judge who kept calling foot faults and changed both his shirt and his shorts on court during a match.’
    • ‘Last time she was here, she says, she and her guitarist, Evan Taubenfeld, dropped their trousers on the ride and mooned the people in the car behind them.’
    • ‘He was touring 300 nights of the year, playing these wild shows: getting drunk, mooning the audience and shooting guns.’
    • ‘Of particular note was the girl who cartwheeled onto stage, promptly mooned the audience, and then pinwheeled her arms in a dancing frenzy for the remainder of the set.’
    • ‘The baby photos are cute, but it's the snap of the foursome cheekily mooning that gets the biggest reaction.’
    • ‘No, my real issue with them is that I am tired of getting inadvertently mooned by complete strangers.’
    • ‘I don't think they should throw him out of baseball, but he does deserve to get booed and mooned.’
    • ‘They're swinging about like monkeys, roaring up and down the aisles and I was even mooned at once.’
    • ‘We do not like some of the things they do, especially those things that break the law or insult Greek sensitivities, such as mooning.’
    • ‘Who could cry when Noah and Todd managed to moon the entire crowd when they went up to receive their diplomas?’
    • ‘On Nov.4, Valleyfield police reported that a 19-year-old boy at a party in a mall parking lot had approached their car and mooned them.’
    • ‘This is the same man that mooned a judge in court just a few weeks ago.’

Phrases

  • over the moon

    • informal Extremely happy; delighted.

      • ‘She is still over the moon, stunned and elated and by her good fortune.’
      • ‘There was absolute jubilation around and people were over the moon with it.’
      • ‘I'm delighted for him and I'm really and truly over the moon for what he's achieved.’
      • ‘The call up came last weekend and I was over the moon with it.’
      • ‘There is actually some good news though, I am now 8 months pregnant and with my new partner who is over the moon at having a child.’
      • ‘If we won the championship, naturally we would be over the moon.’
      • ‘You can tell I'm over the moon by the amount I have rambled on!’
      • ‘He was over the moon and planned to be there at the birth.’
      • ‘Joe, who has worked at the centre since 1991, said he was over the moon with the award which he said was for everyone who works at the centre.’
      • ‘Now she's over the moon that in the space of three years, she's not only got herself a fascinating hobby but a husband and business as well.’
      ecstatic, euphoric, thrilled, overjoyed, elated, delighted, on cloud nine, on cloud seven, treading on air, walking on air, in seventh heaven, jubilant, rapturous, beside oneself with joy, jumping for joy, exultant, transported, delirious, enraptured, blissful, in raptures, as pleased as punch, cock-a-hoop, as happy as a sandboy, as happy as larry, like a child with a new toy
      View synonyms
  • many moons ago

    • informal A long time ago.

      • ‘Then there are the regular habitués who, many moons ago, took up permanent residence along the boulevard's sidewalks.’
      • ‘We used to go out together many, many moons ago - actually we dated for 7 years - and it was a very happy time being in the swinging 80s.’
      • ‘One summer, many moons ago, I worked in Carillon, Quebec, as a guide for Parks Canada at the Carillon / Granville lock.’
      • ‘As a young man, many, many moons ago, he visited nearby Moorehall where he met and courted his loving, patient wife, Sally.’
      • ‘I've always loved writing and when I was at school many moons ago, I was lucky enough to have an English teacher who encouraged me.’
      • ‘I have never played this game but seem to remember seeing it on the shelves of some shops I've been in many moons ago.’
      • ‘But, many moons ago, someone somewhere read complaints about cable modem service and believed it.’
      • ‘That's when we first met many, many moons ago and then we started having him on as a regular guest maybe once a month, maybe even twice a month.’
      • ‘Many many moons ago, I dated a guy who was into rockclimbing.’
      • ‘Brenda is one of the best at our game and I was lucky enough to have benefited from being a classmate of hers, many moons ago, in college.’

Origin

Old English mōna, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch maan and German Mond, also to month, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin mensis and Greek mēn ‘month’, and also Latin metiri ‘to measure’ (the moon being used to measure time).

Pronunciation

moon

/mo͞on//mun/