Definition of mooch in English:

mooch

verb

informal
  • 1North American [with object] Ask for or obtain (something) without paying for it.

    ‘a bunch of your friends will show up, mooching food’
    [no object] ‘I'm mooching off you all the time’
    • ‘I could probably just mooch off my brother, he usually mooched off of our mom, anyway.’
    • ‘She's mooching off my name, trying to get money or something like that, I suppose.’
    • ‘Plus, since Ron couldn't mooch rides off me anymore, he stopped coming by my place as much.’
    • ‘Jerry was going to a community college and mooching off of my mum while he did.’
    • ‘The only way he could think of was mooching a ride out of Abby and Brian.’
    • ‘Still unable to sleep well in his unfamiliar surroundings, David headed for the kitchen at two in the morning, hoping someone had left an unemptied coffee pot from which he could mooch a leftover cupful.’
    • ‘Undaunted, Matthew mooches thousands of dollars from his parents and self publishes.’
    • ‘Would you like to mooch dinner off of me tonight?’
    • ‘I dropped by Shay's apartment to mooch food.’
    • ‘Not only does he mooch my money and my beer, but now he mooches my valuable radio time!’
    • ‘He goes around the cafeteria and floats from table to table, talking with everyone and mooching off them at the same time so he doesn't have to pay for lunch.’
    • ‘No money equals no food, and it wasn't like I had any friends to mooch off of.’
    • ‘I hate mooching lifts off of other people.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, Steph keeps busy trying to mooch a place to stay off his lover, Rose.’
    • ‘He was always late for class, he always mooched off of Melissa for food and he could be so insensitive.’
    • ‘Yes, I would mooch a ride with him… if he didn't run away before I could talk to him.’
    • ‘Oh, before that Wesley and I went to Michael's home and mooched beer off him.’
    • ‘Did you just figure you could mooch food off of me as well?’
    • ‘They are nice in every way, except for the fact that they always try to mooch food from us.’
    • ‘The two merchants didn't look entirely pleased to have the players mooching off of their business, but it was obvious to the eyes of an outsider that the music was actually attracting customers.’
    ask for money, solicit money, seek charity, seek alms
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  • 2mooch around/about[no object] Loiter in a bored or listless manner.

    ‘he didn't want them mooching around all day’
    • ‘Meanwhile, Scott's mooching around the house (no change there then).’
    • ‘They mooch around with no energy and look miserable backstage.’
    • ‘Firstly, according to reports, Tom mooched about on his own in a hotel room while Katie went out shopping for the day, only to join her at the Post House Steakhouse for a meal with around a dozen friends.’
    • ‘Well, I got there a bit early so went and mooched round a couple of gallery rooms.’
    • ‘He mooched around the Common Room for a few minutes wondering if he should go over his homework again but decided not to bother, he just wasn't in the mood.’
    • ‘Tracy was looking for a new mobile phone, so whilst mooching round Carlisle yesterday we happened to look in the mobile shop.’
    • ‘When I woke I found I couldn't settle to much, and I've spent the rest of the day mooching, not doing the cleaning, not doing the washing, not sweeping the paths and not removing the weeds from the front fence.’
    • ‘I remember spending hours mooching round Robinson's records and the Church Street market.’
    • ‘The train rolls smoothly along through the night, and during the day you can take a tailor-made excursion or slope off alone and dart down inviting alleyways, mooch around markets or bargain in bazaars.’
    • ‘No, they can't tell me when he'll show up - so I have to mooch about and wait.’
    • ‘It should be just about enough to see everything on the list I've made from flicking through the guidebook, but it doesn't leave much time for mooching around and sitting in cafes.’
    • ‘We spend the rest of the night mooching around in the lounge.’
    • ‘As I was mooching about I called into a shop and bought a couple of really nice porcelain mugs that were in the sale for £3.00.’
    • ‘Four British soldiers mooch nonchalantly with rifles on the shoreline as the mast of a German ship flails over just three metres away.’
    • ‘I'm in San Francisco from the 17th till 28th of this month for the Emerging Tech Conference and some general mooching around.’
    • ‘Today I spent the day mooching around Preston market with stops in several drinking establishments and a few games of Table Football with my friend Dean…’
    • ‘The meetings were kept mercifully short, and were followed by an extensive buffet, and there was plenty of free time for mooching around and doing our own stuff.’
    • ‘So I'm going to lay in bed late, then probably head over to Brighton to mooch about the shops.’
    • ‘Today I mooched around a bit more to get my bearings.’
    • ‘We're now mooching around the flat and trying to work out where to eat this evening.’
    dawdle, dally, stroll, saunter, loll, go slowly, take one's time, go at a snail's pace, move at a snail's pace, drag one's feet, delay
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noun

North American
  • A beggar or scrounger.

    ‘the mooch who got everything from his dad’
    • ‘Banks are a bunch of mooches.’
    • ‘"The only way I would like George is that if he sobered up and quit being a mooch off of you," She replied.’
    • ‘We threw out the mooches, the loafers, and the do-nothings.’
    • ‘He brought an empty bottle wrapped in a brown paper bag to a party so he wouldn't appear a mooch.’
    • ‘I ate a pack of her cheese on crackers like a mooch.’
    • ‘You might get something for free, but you'll become known as a mooch.’
    • ‘For starters, the meathead was very much both a mooch and much worse—an ingrate.’
    • ‘Imagine an army of mooches knowing that you'll give things up upon request.’
    • ‘For some reason society continues to coddle these mooches, and thus it is considered noble to take part in giving the needy what they want.’
    • ‘She recently told the daughter of a mooch that she ought to leave her father to his bottomless debt.’
    tramp, beggarman, beggarwoman, vagrant, vagabond, down-and-out, homeless person, derelict, mendicant
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Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense to hoard): probably from Anglo-Norman French muscher hide, skulk A dialect sense play truant dates from the early 16th century; current senses date from the mid 19th century.

Pronunciation

mooch

/mo͞oCH/