Definition of monastic in US English:

monastic

adjective

  • 1Relating to monks, nuns, or others living under religious vows, or the buildings in which they live.

    ‘a monastic order’
    • ‘Sera is one of the three great Gelug monastic universities where monks do intensive study and training in Buddhist philosophy.’
    • ‘Medieval people believed that the suffering of the dead could be eased by the prayers of the living, and monastic prayers of intercession were valued most highly.’
    • ‘It was a memorable visit, and uplifting for both monastic orders.’
    • ‘It is my understanding that the current debate preserves monastic celibacy within the religious orders, just as it does for the Eastern Church.’
    • ‘The religious pillars, of course, are the clergy and monastic orders.’
    • ‘So we spent a lot of time living there with this specific community of monks, a monastic household.’
    • ‘The church and monastic buildings on Lindisfarne today date from the Norman period when a Benedictine monastery was established on the island.’
    • ‘Before noon of the same day, that forge was blessed by the monastic priests of nearby Kadavul Temple.’
    • ‘There is a lot that Heloise has to say on the subject of religion in her later monastic writings.’
    • ‘The akharas' dates of founding range from the sixth to the fourteenth century, though large monastic orders have existed throughout India's long history.’
    • ‘I saw how they lived, saw how they dressed, and that influenced in a very strict way the monastic protocols that we later put into action in our own monastic order.’
    • ‘With regard to marriage Luther pursues the same idea: The marital relationship between a man and a woman is true chastity and of higher value than monastic asceticism.’
    • ‘Yet, there is a fourth form of service to the world that is much more central to the Orthodox monastic vocation: providing spiritual guidance.’
    • ‘Historically, Psalms have always been sung by believers, beginning in Jewish worship and continuing through that of monastic orders.’
    • ‘The monastic orders were linked to the bureaucratic structure through papal recognition and interlocking networks.’
    • ‘Most Theravada monks live as part of monastic communities.’
    • ‘Today we'll hear from two Buddhists, who lived a monastic life, and also left it after some years.’
    • ‘Some monastic sects, such as the lingayats, wear stone lingams around their necks as a part of their sacred practice.’
    • ‘Chastity is the third monastic virtue, the opposite of voluptuousness.’
    • ‘It may be wondered if this is the best solution to the situation brought about by the dominance of the monastic tradition in Orthodox worship.’
    cloistered, conventual, cloistral, claustral, canonical, monastical
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Resembling or suggestive of monks or their way of life, especially in being austere, solitary, or celibate.
      ‘a monastic student bedroom’
      • ‘Music is, by implication, a solitary and almost monastic pursuit, one unabashedly privileged over friendship or love.’
      • ‘The bedrooms vary from private apartment to monastic simplicity, yet all bear the hallmarks of a considerate host: candles, joss sticks, tea-making facilities and mosquito repellent.’
      • ‘This image of a monastic, reclusive author, wilfully at odds with much of modernity, was confirmed by the posthumous appearance of Brown's autobiography.’
      • ‘He lives a monastic lifestyle, associates with no one, and has no personal relationships.’
      • ‘It was a very austere kind of monastic existence.’
      • ‘The Armenian Quarter is a little known part of the city and its stone passages and cloisters give it a secluded, monastic air.’
      • ‘Having had a good day of golf and wine with the two Jims and myself, he retired to his room in the monastic student hall of residence.’
      austere, ascetic, simple, solitary, monkish, celibate, quiet, cloistered, sequestered, secluded, reclusive, withdrawn, hermit-like, eremitic, anchoritic, hermitic, contemplative, meditative
      View synonyms

noun

  • A monk or other follower of a monastic rule.

    • ‘What does the tradition itself say about regulating the behavior of monastics?’
    • ‘In the West, however, most Zen practitioners are not monastics.’
    • ‘There is little direct precedent for this model in Asia, where only monastics engage in serious meditation, and its long-range future remains an open question.’
    • ‘While there are three million Hindu monastics today, most are loosely organized.’
    • ‘It is very helpful for young monastics to be exposed to the influence of dedicated lay practitioners.’
    • ‘He sent one of his monastics to teach classes all over the nation for nearly a year.’
    • ‘Besides the ascesis through spiritual fatherhood, the monastics fulfill their daily spiritual exercise through the more common practices of prayer, fasting, and vigil.’
    • ‘While seldom scholars or even clerics, these monastics turned the desert into a city.’
    • ‘In Asia monastics were great healers, and incredible people.’
    • ‘Medieval monastics sought to abstain from enjoying daily life, lest they prefer it to God.’
    • ‘Through daily ascesis, even in periods of no external persecution, the monastics testify to the martyrdom of conscience.’
    • ‘Hence, monastics are continuously involved in ascesis in order to rid their selves of the heavy burden of self-idolization and self-love.’
    • ‘Thus, monastics are prophets of the second coming not primarily through their words but through their total existence.’
    • ‘For 500 years, most monastics in Europe belonged to the Benedictine religious order.’
    • ‘Among the Celtic monastics there was a form of spiritual direction in which the monks and the nuns discussed both their sinfulness and their need to reform.’
    • ‘For the 4th century desert monastics, however, being a zero meant having acquired the virtue of humility.’
    • ‘I didn't tell anyone about this at the time, except for two or three of the Saivite monastics who were with me in Switzerland.’
    • ‘Like the monastics and mystics at their best, he has a gift for seeing God everywhere.’
    • ‘Weber's texts also employ the typology to distinguish the asceticism of medieval monastics from that of Calvinism.’
    • ‘It is the mix of monastics and lay practitioners that is perhaps the monastery's most innovative and vital component.’
    monk, cleric, friar, religious, regular, monastic, contemplative
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘anchoritic’): from late Latin monasticus, from Greek monastikos, from monazein ‘live alone’.

Pronunciation

monastic

/məˈnæstɪk//məˈnastik/