Definition of monarch in English:

monarch

noun

  • 1A sovereign head of state, especially a king, queen, or emperor.

    • ‘Recently, the museum had the good fortune to acquire the portraits of the monarch and his queen illustrated here.’
    • ‘Manuscript illumination flourished under the patronage of the dukes of Burgundy, kings of England, Portuguese monarchs, and Hapsburg rulers.’
    • ‘Although politically unified since the reign of the Catholic monarchs Ferdinand and Isabel in the late fifteenth century, Spain continues to be divided by regional loyalties.’
    • ‘In 1900, when Queen Victoria was our monarch, banks accounted for roughly a sixth of the value of the entire stock market.’
    • ‘The English and French monarchs were kings and queens of the land and not the people.’
    • ‘He returned to the throne in 1993 as a constitutional monarch who ‘reigns but does not govern.’’
    • ‘The British annexed Burma in 1886 during the reign of its last monarch - King Thibaw - who was taken to Calcutta, where he died in 1916.’
    • ‘This should not be too surprising as emperors and monarchs had been famous in history for their love of flowers and gardens.’
    • ‘Ministers will be put under pressure to scrap the law that bans the eldest daughter of a British monarch from becoming queen if she has a brother.’
    • ‘Since then I have described the Queen as our monarch or sovereign, and the governor-general as our head of state.’
    • ‘He shakes hands with the principality's reigning monarch, Prince Hans Adam II, at a garden fête.’
    • ‘He served as a principal secretary to four successive Tudor monarchs, from Henry VIII to the early reign of Queen Elizabeth.’
    • ‘The 15th-century gothic church is the burial place of 10 monarchs, including Henry VIII, Charles I and the Queen's father, King George VI.’
    • ‘He managed to curry favour with a succession of kings of England and was consort to the nine-year-old monarch Henry III.’
    • ‘When the Queen first began her reign, monarchs were expected to be somewhat detached, grand and distant figures, especially the British monarch.’
    • ‘Stamboliiski boldly opposed Bulgaria's entry into the First World War in the face of the monarch Tsar Ferdinand.’
    • ‘Being a constitutional monarch, the Queen consistently follows the recommendation of the head of government as required.’
    • ‘The last time the monarch refused to give Royal Assent was in 1707 with Queen Anne.’
    • ‘They called themselves the king and supreme monarch of their respective monarchies by the mandate of heaven.’
    • ‘Centuries after the city famously locked out the reigning monarch King Charles I, it was a time to forgive and forget.’
    sovereign, ruler, crown, crowned head, potentate
    View synonyms
  • 2

    • ‘Conservationists and others concerned about the fate of the monarch butterfly may be heartened by a recent survey of milkweed distribution in the major U.S. corn-growing area.’
    • ‘During its final growth stage, the constantly feeding larva of a monarch butterfly consumes an amazing 2.25 times its own weight in milkweed per day.’
    • ‘Some insects, like the monarch butterfly, migrate to warmer climes in winter.’
    • ‘Honey-bees glided over the roses and a monarch butterfly flew over the fence to land on a wing of the cherub.’
    • ‘The most incredible butterfly journey, measured in thousands of miles compared with our painted lady's few hundred mile trip, belongs to the monarch butterfly of North America.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from late Latin monarcha, from Greek monarkhēs, from monos ‘alone’ + arkhein ‘to rule’.

Pronunciation