Definition of mockery in English:

mockery

noun

  • 1Teasing and contemptuous language or behavior directed at a particular person or thing.

    ‘stung by her mockery, Frankie hung his head’
    • ‘A few words of mockery and sarcasm might have slipped, but generally, we were certainly not arch rivals.’
    • ‘Anything's open for ridicule or criticism or mockery.’
    • ‘Open sarcasm and mockery entered his voice.’
    • ‘But amidst society's contempt and mockery, young people built a movement strong enough to make Congress realize the practicality of lowering the voting age.’
    • ‘Defiant in the faces of her demons, she snarled at their smiles and laughter; glared at their mockery and ridicule.’
    • ‘His voice was absolutely sincere, with no mockery or sarcasm even hinted.’
    • ‘I don't agree with you and therefore I'm only worthy of your derision and mockery.’
    • ‘The more discussion-worthy point, however, is the use of humor as a political weapon - mockery, derision, diminishment.’
    • ‘‘Too right,’ said Tina, who was the only girl in their year who took politics and inevitably bore the brunt of the boys' mockery and teasing.’
    • ‘More straightforwardly aggressive 12 months ago, yesterday he mixed contempt with pitying mockery.’
    • ‘He first tried mockery as he called the characterization ‘the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen in my life.’’
    • ‘With greetings of hope and yet of sarcastic mockery the crowd cheered his emerging form.’
    • ‘Debate the guy, denounce him, subject him to ridicule and mockery at every opportunity.’
    • ‘Was it not enough that, like the other insignia, it should be an emblem of scorn and mockery, since that was their aim?’
    • ‘It is an anarchic art, rooted in mockery, a ridiculous gesture towards the absurdity of the established order.’
    • ‘His tone held a hint of mockery and sarcasm when he addressed her as young lady.’
    • ‘Maybe I've strayed off-topic here, but I think that mockery and derision is, oddly enough, part of the stuff of taking religion seriously.’
    • ‘For all groups to be subject to open criticism, including mockery and ridicule, has been a great leveller.’
    • ‘The part I don't get is why the really dreadful singers set themselves up for scorn and mockery - and they have to know that's what they're in for.’
    • ‘For the first time, it seemed, there was no mockery or teasing in George's voice.’
    ridicule, derision, jeering, sneering, contempt, scorn, scoffing, joking, teasing, taunting, sarcasm, ragging, chaffing, jibing
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    1. 1.1in singular An absurd misrepresentation or imitation of something.
      ‘after a mockery of a trial in London, he was executed’
      • ‘Is it an important step towards reconciliation or a mockery of democracy?’
      • ‘The Labour MP has branded the fines dolled out for breach of disability laws as a mockery of the government's zero tolerance policy.’
      • ‘It would have been a mockery of the British way of life to stand by and let a man like him terrorise me on my own doorstep.’
      • ‘This is of course not a fair and open practice and a mockery of the ‘people's parliament’.’
      • ‘The action by the local Council has created furore among ramblers, who say that the action was wrong and a mockery of consultation procedures laid down by law.’
      • ‘Then, in a mockery of the political process, they set up a polling centre amongst the ruins and called it democracy.’
      • ‘‘Any conclusion that this is about spying on residents would be a grotesque misunderstanding of the training provided and a mockery of our intentions,’ a trust director said.’
      • ‘The United States ambassador said the demonstrations were a mockery of the right of protest and freedom of assembly.’
      • ‘More recently the hotel descended into a mockery of its former self, snobbish for snobbery's sake, until rescued in 1995.’
      • ‘To conclude, the April 30th referendum is a mockery of democracy and an encore of long-established patterns of political deceit in this country.’
      • ‘Painful as it seems, and as much as we know that he's going to be found guilty, the trial can't just be a mockery of a real trial.’
      • ‘It's a travesty, a mockery of our Constitutional system, and they will not rest until this hideous distortion of all that is good and decent has been ended once and for all.’
      • ‘It's a mockery of the game to play it in forcibly sanitized conditions.’
      • ‘You undermine minimal democracy itself, and are left with a mockery of political rights.’
      • ‘Online petitions are a mockery of grassroots democracy.’
      • ‘What eventually took its place was a travesty of the real thing, a mockery of the power that could raise men to heaven and give them the glimpse of God for which they gladly died.’
      • ‘This dangerous double standard makes a sham and a mockery of the justice system.’
      • ‘To call that a ‘free choice’ is a mockery of language.’
      travesty, charade, farce, parody, laughing stock, caricature, lampoon, burlesque, apology, excuse, poor substitute
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    2. 1.2archaic Ludicrously futile action.
      ‘in her bitterness she felt that all rejoicing was mockery’

Phrases

  • make a mockery of

    • Make (something) seem foolish or absurd.

      ‘new technology is making a mockery of our outdated laws’
      • ‘An immediate departure by the Dutchman would have made a mockery of all that had been constructed in his name.’
      • ‘I notice that your decision to send your son to a private school is embarrassing you, making a mockery of what you've said in the past about education.’
      • ‘He was making a mockery of how our society works and our expectations.’
      • ‘What has happened makes a mockery of what this Committee is considering today.’
      • ‘I think any time we profess something with our lips and we don't back it up with our lives, you make a mockery of what you say you believe.’
      • ‘To do so makes a mockery of what the playoffs should be all about.’
      • ‘You would make a mockery of out if our family name!’
      • ‘That would be absurd and make a mockery of the entire project (as well as rendering all other results from it unreliable).’
      • ‘To express any form of sympathy for them makes a mockery of what I feel for their victims.’
      • ‘The traditions of the game were made a mockery of.’
      • ‘He is making a mockery of all this in his business dealings and justifying his actions by saying he has to be competitive with the rest of the world.’
      • ‘Indeed, to suggest otherwise is to make a mockery of true individual liberty.’
      • ‘This will make a mockery of all the years of consultation and campaigning by so many local people.’
      • ‘It also makes it plainly evident that some at the Town Hall have vested interests that make a mockery of what it should stand for - which is impartial service to the people of this community.’
      • ‘It's all too often clumsy, insincere and inappropriate, making a mockery of otherwise noble values.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French moquerie, from mocquer ‘to deride’.

Pronunciation

mockery

/ˈmäk(ə)rē//ˈmɑk(ə)ri/