Definition of mobile in English:

mobile

Pronunciation: /ˈmōˌbīl//ˈmōbəl/

adjective

  • 1Able to move or be moved freely or easily.

    ‘he has a major weight problem and is not very mobile’
    ‘highly mobile international capital’
    • ‘Physiotherapy can help to keep the joints mobile (able to move) and strengthen the surrounding muscles.’
    • ‘Actually, the decrease is also harmful if capital is mobile internationally, as it is today under globalization.’
    • ‘America's ability to attract the capital needed to finance this deficit confirms its hegemonic status as the safest home for mobile international capital.’
    • ‘When mobile international capital escapes taxation, as it increasingly does, it makes social protection much more difficult to pay for.’
    • ‘As laptop horsepower has steadily grown, mobile PCs have been able to take on more daunting tasks usually best left to their desktop brethren.’
    • ‘By using large, easily mobile poultry sheds he allows his birds to benefit from clean, fresh ground each day around the farm's 100 acres of fields and woodlands.’
    • ‘They will be able to invite mobile bankers to their homes and offices.’
    • ‘The payback is that our older folk have a better quality of life; they are able to be mobile, to go out and enjoy their grandkids.’
    • ‘On the contrary, he's surprisingly mobile, able to bowl over defenders or fake them out.’
    • ‘The woman, diagnosed with the disease 11 years ago, is currently fully mobile and is able to work as a childminder from home.’
    • ‘As I understand it they are mobile and can easily be transferred if the need arises.’
    • ‘Behind all the financial jargon, basically what the meeting was about was how to tax some of the mobile capital that's bouncing around the global economy.’
    • ‘They were also more independently mobile and were able to be discharged sooner.’
    • ‘However, he argues that the benefits of ‘free trade’ do not necessarily hold when capital goods are mobile internationally.’
    able to move, able to move around, moving, walking, ambulant, ambulatory
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of the face or its features) indicating feelings with fluid and expressive movements.
      ‘her mobile features working overtime to register shock and disapproval’
      • ‘He has an incredibly mobile face, and a lithe body that he can still contort into incredible shapes.’
      • ‘So my face is still mobile and expressive, and while it won't ever look 25 again, there is a marked difference.’
      • ‘The bandleader, who doubles as the vocalist, is a small, nimble man with a mobile face and dark, bristly hair.’
      • ‘His face is mobile and pensive, reflecting a deeper register of emotion than his acting peers in Miami and Las Vegas.’
      • ‘His mobile face creases into a road atlas of frowns.’
      • ‘Small and slight, beneath a few grey hairs she has a gamine, mobile face.’
      • ‘She is an endless delight, with her humorous, homely, mobile face; she's terrific at mugging and double takes.’
      • ‘His exhibit of a human skull captivates the viewer with its tranquil, yet mobile, expression.’
      • ‘The cook was a huge singing head whose mobile features and acting skills exceed the expressive capacities of most live opera singers.’
      • ‘‘Actors are trained to have very mobile expressions, so you have to do the opposite of that,’ she says.’
      • ‘He again raised one delicate eyebrow, a pained expression on his mobile face.’
      • ‘Then leaps back into action like an Italian, talking with hands and very, very mobile face.’
      • ‘She has expressively mobile features and switches from youthful hope to aged eccentricity with admirable economy.’
      • ‘She has the mobile, expressive face of an intelligent, successful woman: but her limbs are helpless, twisted with painful spasms.’
      expressive, eloquent, suggestive, meaning, speaking, revealing, telltale, animated, changing, ever-changing
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    2. 1.2 (of a store, library, or other service) accommodated in a vehicle so as to travel around and serve various places.
      • ‘Instead, they decided to axe the mobile library servicing the town.’
      • ‘It comes just weeks after the council announced plans to scrap its mobile library service.’
      • ‘I'm not sure a mobile library is the answer for the elderly.’
      • ‘The budget-making meeting saw a reprieve for the city's children's book bus, which was set to be scrapped and the service merged with the mobile library scheme.’
      • ‘The City Health Department sent a mobile service team out into neighboring communities to assist disadvantaged families living outside of the Central area.’
      • ‘The latest strategy was devised by officers who looked at the locations and conditions of the council's existing 31 libraries as well as the areas served by its three mobile libraries.’
      • ‘Hopefully, towards the end of September our mobile library service will commence.’
      • ‘The need for a mobile library has been felt in the residential areas after the District Library Authority suspended its mobile service for various reasons some time back.’
      • ‘The mobile library service dates back to the age of horse and cart, but expanded rapidly with the closure of many smaller rural branches.’
      • ‘A world in which there were milkmen, and bread delivery men, and mobile shops, and a tight knit community.’
      • ‘The mobile service is designed to bring the marriage bureau to the doorstep of the customer.’
      • ‘The mobile laboratory will be able to address many problems arising from the use of the disciplines of pathology, dermatology, and allergies.’
      • ‘This does not matter because they will be able to use mobile finger print scanners to check someone's ID.’
      • ‘City chiefs also agreed to spend an extra £100,000 to buy a new mobile library service.’
      • ‘I read a lot but find new books are few and far between, so people are discouraged from using the mobile library, which is a shame as it serves well for elderly and disabled.’
      • ‘Leisure chiefs are under fire for moves to close a suburban branch library and replace it with a mobile service.’
      • ‘The plans also include expanding the mobile library service with two extra vehicles and a big investment in new books, CDs, videos and DVDs.’
      • ‘They are able to form a mobile A&E ward that can be flown out to the small community GP run hospitals.’
      • ‘In a bid to reduce waiting times, 200 patients are being sent to Hope Hospital in Salford where they will be able to use a mobile scanner in the car park.’
      • ‘The mobile library and home delivery service will be maintained.’
      travelling, transportable, transferable, portable, movable, locomotive, manoeuvrable
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 (of a military or police unit) equipped and prepared to move quickly to any place it is needed.
      ‘mobile army combat units’
      • ‘A mobile police unit has been on standby at the Embassy since Tuesday night.’
      • ‘An integral part of setting the force will be a particular emphasis on achieving the Army's modularity objectives for more versatile and mobile units.’
      • ‘Funding for the mobile police unit, which currently patrols the city's weekend ‘nightbus’ network, is due to end early next year.’
      • ‘The most important way to achieve this, to our mind, is to create highly mobile military units in the Armed Forces.’
      • ‘Work is going on around the clock to complete the task of clearing the scene and a small village of briefing tents, police vans and mobile investigation units has grown up.’
      • ‘Police officers stationed at a mobile unit outside his home and national newspaper reporters will keep a round-the-clock watch on the farm.’
      • ‘The prevalent attitude was ‘we work hard and play hard,’ which is also dominant in many mobile units today.’
      • ‘Officers from Farnworth police station will be seconded to the mobile unit which will be fitted out with offices and equipped with computers and telephones.’
      • ‘On many occasions mobile army groups and even fronts were brought into the battle to complete a breach of the main defense line.’
      • ‘The mobile military had done nothing, the ground cannons were a similar failure, and there had been no pre-emptive weakening phase.’
      • ‘As news of the incident spread around the community, Police stepped up their presence on the estate and set up a mobile police unit to reassure people.’
      • ‘The officers thought that in modern mechanized warfare dismounted infantry would delay the mobile units on which success depended.’
      • ‘In the afternoon of 23 March a police officer was on mobile patrol duty in the town centre.’
      • ‘A special mobile police or army unit is being formed, in order to seize and deport foreigners or rejected asylum-seekers living illegally in the country.’
      • ‘If necessary, they are to be reinforced with mobile units redeployed from other areas.’
      • ‘Another five new mobile units will start patrols by the end of the year.’
      • ‘Their task was to delay any attempted enemy landing for long enough to allow the mobile units stationed in the interior to intervene.’
      • ‘And they were relatively untrained and ill prepared to attack a mobile army in the field.’
      • ‘It will then open at varying times fortnightly, alternating with the visit of the mobile police unit.’
      • ‘The goal of Task Force Modularity is to restructure the Army so that tactical level combat units are more mobile and can self-sustain longer than ever before.’
  • 2Relating to mobile phones, handheld computers, and similar technology.

    ‘the next generation of mobile networks’
    ‘a mobile device’
    • ‘For an industry that wants to make money, the mobile data business does not move fast.’
    • ‘With a Bluetooth wireless connection, it is even possible to run a presentation from a mobile handset without the need for a laptop.’
    • ‘Shareholders also questioned investments in mobile players in developing countries.’
    • ‘Toshiba were one of the pioneers in mobile computing and their machines still retain a little bit of pioneering class.’
    • ‘Analysts are divided regarding future prospects for Vodafone shares, despite a rebound in the share price of the British mobile operator last week.’
    • ‘But within, a few young, tech-savvy aides are trying to drag municipal government into the age of mobile gadgetry.’
    • ‘The situation has been similar in the mobile market.’
    • ‘Teenagers will carry mobile devices, allowing their parents to track and access them via a home computer.’
    • ‘What we are now starting to see, more and more, are PC vendors marketing mobile broadband, embedded on our notebook computers.’
    • ‘Consumers demanded mobile video.’
    • ‘The company's coolest announcements includes a video sharing service for cell phones and a mobile banking tool.’
    • ‘Most importantly, mobile streaming provides operators with strong, recurring revenue streams.’
    • ‘The problem with new mobile data services lies not with the services themselves but with the devices used to access them.’
  • 3Able or willing to move easily or freely between occupations, places of residence, or social classes.

    ‘an increasingly mobile and polarized society’
    • ‘It probably meant that he was easily mobile - able to move and travel at the slightest notice.’
    • ‘Residents are very mobile, and nearly 80 percent are now urban.’
    • ‘These institutions tend to arise naturally, he argues, with the emergence of a socially mobile middle class.’
    • ‘If the factors of production are internationally mobile, capital and labor would move from England to Portugal, where both commodities can be produced the cheapest.’
    • ‘There was no large and mobile urban middle class with time and money to spend communing with nature in the national parks.’
    • ‘The thing is, our high school has a very mobile social ladder.’
    • ‘In economic terms this is the creation of a socially mobile class.’
    • ‘Participants were mobile, averaging 2.2 residences in the past year.’
    • ‘Labor and capital are assumed perfectly mobile within an exporting country, but must stay within that country.’
    • ‘The number of usual residents was 6,639,000 while mobile residents was 206,400.’
    • ‘Francis, who was geographically and occupationally mobile, did not attain the same social and economic upward mobility as his brother Paul.’
    • ‘To play that role you need to be mobile, able to hold the ball up under pressure and willing to run and run.’
    • ‘The main advantage of this is that mobile workers will be able to access one work environment wherever they are.’
    adaptable, flexible, versatile, changing, fluid, moving, on the move, adjustable, transplantable
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A decorative structure that is suspended so as to turn freely in the air.

    • ‘His characters are so thin they could have been hand painted in a kindergarten and suspended from a mobile.’
    • ‘He assembled the crib and placed it by the window, and he hung a small mobile above the bed.’
    • ‘Make mobiles by suspending objects from coat hangers and ensuring they balance.’
    • ‘A leaf mobile is the perfect decoration for the fall season!’
    • ‘I was staring at the dust filtering through beams of sunlight shining through my bird mobile.’
    • ‘It will be 60 minutes long and will essentially feature characters suspended by a mobile from a crane.’
    • ‘After our initial enthusiasm we lost interest in the paper mache go-go earrings, the bird mobile, the hand-held battery fan.’
    • ‘Provide brightly colored mobiles and textured objects for your baby to look at and hold.’
    • ‘The electricity system may be likened to a giant mobile with suspended weights.’
  • 2The Internet as accessed via smartphones or other mobile devices, especially when regarded as a market sector.

    ‘the biggest growth area in games right now is in mobile’

Origin

Late 15th century: via French from Latin mobilis, from movere to move The noun dates from the 1940s.

Pronunciation:

mobile

/ˈmōˌbīl//ˈmōbəl/

Definition of Mobile in English:

Mobile

Pronunciation: /ˈmōˌbīl//ˈmōbəl/

proper noun

  • An industrial city and port on the coast of southern Alabama; population 191,022 (est. 2008). It is situated at the head of Mobile Bay, an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico.

Pronunciation:

Mobile

/mōˈbēl//ˈmōˌbēl/