Definition of mixed-race in English:

mixed-race

adjective

  • Denoting or relating to people whose parents or ancestors are from different ethnic backgrounds.

    ‘mixed-race children’
    ‘a mixed-race neighborhood’
    • ‘The Changing Faces exhibition also looks at the mixed race relationships that are increasingly creating a fusion of cultures.’
    • ‘Lincoln, seeing this masterly orator of mixed-race ancestry, would most likely first have been reminded of his exceptional friend, Douglass.’
    • ‘Shockingly, only 550 were black or mixed race.’
    • ‘Don't let your mixed-race cousin feel she has to be all white to be in your family.’
    • ‘What is interesting to me is what happened to the mixed-race sons of these liaisons.’
    • ‘She grew up in Chapeltown in Leeds in one of the only mixed race families.’
    • ‘Mixed race marriages are less common than many like to think.’
    • ‘She was a mixed-race child, one of 12 children of alcoholic parents.’
    • ‘The victim was a mixed race man from north London.’
    • ‘Mr Obama's appeal is partly his own mixed-race backstory.’
    • ‘A mixed race family is pulled apart by a domineering father whose children are unwilling to bow to his staunch Muslim beliefs.’
    • ‘Hispanics can be white, black or of mixed race.’
    • ‘Maternal custody can only perform this repatriation for mixed-race children born to mothers of African descent, however.’
    • ‘A few months earlier, a mistake with sperm samples at a fertility clinic in Leeds led to the birth of mixed-race twins to a white couple.’
    • ‘Of course, through the 1960s, Southern states had laws that forbade mixed-race unions.’
    • ‘In my own life I have been approached by the parents or parents-to-be of mixed race children who want the same advice.’
    • ‘I have seen mixed race children get treated differently according to whether their black parent or their white parent turns up to school.’
    • ‘Samaritans were an inferior mixed race in the Jewish mind.’
    • ‘The problem is, of course, that they don't include the mixed-race heritage.’
    • ‘Ben was part of a mixed-race group from Penge, an estate in south-east London, where the boys grew up.’