Definition of mitigation in English:

mitigation

noun

  • The action of reducing the severity, seriousness, or painfulness of something.

    ‘the emphasis is on the identification and mitigation of pollution’
    • ‘Only Zionism - so at least Zionists believe - can provide some mitigation of this great tragedy.’
    • ‘There is some mitigation owing to the relationships between the parties.’
    • ‘Not one of these forms of mitigation tells me what I want to know about art.’
    • ‘This guidance also needs to cover best practice for mitigation and compensation.’
    • ‘At that point, there will be aggravation from the state, mitigation from the defense.’
    • ‘Prevention is not on; and timely mitigation is the only plausible solution.’
    • ‘These are the things that drive expected value, that mitigation seeks to reduce.’
    • ‘This is a strategy not of flood prevention but of flood mitigation and control.’
    • ‘Anyway, disaster mitigation is typically not an area where partisan divisions are relevant.’
    • ‘This goes well beyond any formal obligation on environmental mitigation and protection.’
    • ‘They are working on mitigation and contingency responses for a range of scenarios.’
    • ‘It will work towards creating public awareness, mitigation and taking action when a calamity strikes.’
    • ‘By way of mitigation, the hospital's general manager added that the hospital was ten years old.’
    alleviation, reduction, diminution, lessening, easing, weakening, lightening, assuagement, palliation, cushioning, dulling, deadening
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin mitigatio(n-), from the verb mitigare alleviate (see mitigate).

Pronunciation

mitigation

/ˌmidəˈɡāSH(ə)n/