Definition of misquote in English:



  • Quote (a person or a piece of written or spoken text) inaccurately.

    ‘the foreign secretary had misquoted Qian’
    • ‘Now the BBC has to either admit that it misquoted a mourned scientist or call him a liar.’
    • ‘I am as yet undecided which of the two errors, misquoting me or mistaking me for a woman (your reporter spoke to me on the phone for more than five minutes) pains me the most.’
    • ‘And he has always tried to explain away criticism by claiming that the media misquoted him.’
    • ‘Spalding has always maintained he was misquoted.’
    • ‘It concerns me greatly that not only was the event misconstrued, but I was personally misquoted.’
    • ‘I mean, would you as an editor of a large newspaper necessarily know if one of your reporters was misquoting someone or stealing elements from other stories?’
    • ‘Judging from the principal's form response to correspondents it sounds like he was also misquoted by the Rutland Herald and has even used blogging in the classroom himself.’
    • ‘I am happy to seek leave to table the letter I wrote to the newspaper, which had grossly misquoted me.’
    • ‘I believe however that I was misquoted regarding my attitudes towards the school system.’
    • ‘Well, if it's the incident I think you're referring to, I am that reporter and I can assure you he was not misquoted.’
    • ‘Are we to believe the government-run media misquoted the athlete?’
    • ‘The Minister said, he was misquoted by the Indian media and therefore he clarified India's position the next day.’
    • ‘Although, as is the case with so many of the foreign contingent plying their trade in this country, perhaps he was simply misquoted.’
    • ‘An earlier version of this piece misquoted the letter from The Seattle Times.’
    • ‘It would be helpful to know if he was also misquoted in other instances, such as when he is quoted saying that’
    • ‘He wrote back, politely pointing out that I had misquoted him and inviting me to lunch.’
    • ‘The minister tells a news conference her comments to a small group of union members were misquoted by a local newspaper.’
    • ‘I still doubt the authenticity of this statement, maybe he was misquoted, as in the case of Iran.’
    • ‘Are you suggesting that I misunderstood you, misquoted you - or that you want to change what you wrote?’
    misreport, misrepresent, misstate, quote incorrectly, quote out of context, take out of context, distort, twist, slant, bias, put a spin on, pervert, falsify, garble, muddle, mistranslate
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  • A passage or remark quoted inaccurately.

    ‘a misquote from a poem by Robert Burns’
    • ‘Ask reporters and editors this question and you'll get a catalogue of misspelled names, misquotes, and factual errors.’
    • ‘This misquote was included to raise the issue of interpretation within an infallible system - there is a very big difference between infallibility of scripture and infallibility of interpretation.’
    • ‘I think it's been a bit of a misquote because I've never thought of my upbringing as being oppressive in any way.’
    • ‘The 10% statement may have been started with a misquote of Albert Einstein or the misinterpretation of the work of Pierre Flourens in the 1800s.’
    • ‘Thankfully, someone else corrected his misquote, pointing out that a group editing system might have helped out in such a situation.’
    • ‘The misquote was picked up by The Washington Post, the Chicago Sun-Times, and dozens of other newspapers, but it was also flagged by several pro-Dean sites and the popular blog Daily Kos.’
    • ‘I need to correct a misquote in your report on the proposal for a six-term year for schools.’
    • ‘There are unscrupulous journalists just as there are unscrupulous people in all trades, so no doubt some deliberate, mischievous misquotes occur.’
    • ‘‘There were seven misquotes, 32 errors of fact,’ he says, overlooking his own book's refreshingly loose association with accepted English grammar and punctuation.’
    • ‘That dispute started from some misunderstanding and accusations of misquotes.’
    • ‘It is not a verbatim reproduction of the dialogues, so please do allow for the misquotes if there are any.’
    • ‘That way when you say that you didn't have any misquotes, a reader may simply follow the link to the previous exchange, find the citation and look it up for themselves.’
    • ‘Please excuse any misquotes and the hasty sketch.’
    • ‘But this was just a misquote and inaccurate reporting, if you will.’
    • ‘This is the only way one can reasonably explain the numerous grammatical and spelling errors, logical non sequiturs, inaccuracies, misquotes, opaque prose, and prolific use of jargon that clutter almost every page.’
    • ‘This isn't a misquote (grammar mistake and all).’
    • ‘Members have until 10 a.m. the following morning to correct misquotes or other errors in the first drafts.’
    • ‘Many, if not most, complaints about misquotes, I believe, stem from a person's remarks being taken out of context.’
    • ‘A newspaper misquoted Wolfowitz and Dean is accurately quoting a misquote.’
    • ‘I'm not going to get into an argument over whether the message is good or not, but if you read a book with plotholes, misquotes and mistakes, would you then call that book good and the author a good writer?’