Main definitions of misprision in English

: misprision1misprision2

misprision1

(also felony, misprision of treason)

noun

Law
historical
  • The deliberate concealment of one's knowledge of a treasonable act or a felony.

    • ‘If a woman be quick with childe, and by a potion or otherwise killeth it in her wombe; or if a man beat here, whereby the child dieth in her body, and she is delivered of a dead child, this is a great misprision, and no murder.’
    • ‘Justice Dowd on behalf of the International Commission of Jurists also drew the Committee's attention to proposed paragraph 80.1, which creates an offence that used to be called ‘misprision of felony’.’
    • ‘Howard was convicted of misprision of treason but pardoned in 1544.’
    • ‘The effect of this was to remove the offence of misprision of felony, which includes the offence of failing to report a crime.’
    • ‘The Committee referred these concerns to the Attorney-General's Department, who advised that misprision is recognised both in the USA and the United Kingdom, attracting severe penalties.’
    keeping secret, keeping hidden, hiding, hushing up, covering up, cover-up, suppression
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French mesprision error from mesprendre, from mes- wrongly + prendre to take.

Pronunciation:

misprision

/misˈpriZHən/

Main definitions of misprision in English

: misprision1misprision2

misprision2

noun

rare
  • Erroneous judgment, especially of the value or identity of something.

    ‘he despised himself for his misprision’
    • ‘That artworks can be erroneously explicated by their producers is self-evident to historians of contemporary art, whose very existence is predicated on such misprision.’
    • ‘To become Rowley at a second degree, constituted retrospectively in an act of textual misprision even as the fiction of Rowley itself is dispelled, he must of course cede any remaining hold on a stable authorial identity.’
    • ‘When I first read the poem, I immediately fell into misprision by reading ‘do daylight nights defile?’’
    • ‘He says that the anxiety of influence comes out of a complex misreading of earlier writers; a creative interpretation that he calls ‘poetic misprision.’’
    negligence, neglect, neglectfulness, dereliction, forgetfulness, oversight, disregard, non-fulfilment, default, lapse, failure
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: from misprize, influenced by misprision.

Pronunciation:

misprision

/misˈpriZHən/