Definition of miracle in English:

miracle

noun

  • 1A surprising and welcome event that is not explicable by natural or scientific laws and is therefore considered to be the work of a divine agency.

    ‘the miracle of rising from the grave’
    • ‘A number of local shrines and icons that have survived earthquakes or other natural disasters are revered as evidence of miracles or divine intervention.’
    • ‘Suppose God somehow were observed performing extraordinary miracles, in whatever mode of observation is appropriate.’
    • ‘Then, miracle of all miracles, I watched as David healed his sister.’
    • ‘For they considered not the miracle of the loaves: for their heart was hardened.’
    • ‘This preaching and these miracles confirmed this Divine truth: Jesus died for our sins; he rose again to give us a new life, and a life that is to be lived to the full!’
    • ‘The truth is that the disciples were very reluctant to believe in Christ's miracles.’
    • ‘And you're right, miracles do happen.’
    • ‘The miracles and extraordinary events of the gospels were reduced to allegory and one was left with that very English type of faith: tolerant, accommodating Anglicanism.’
    • ‘Investigation then begins into miracles attributed to his or her intercession.’
    • ‘People with traditional religious beliefs may view psychic phenomena as miracles or divine interventions by God.’
    • ‘But miracles began to be attributed to him soon after his execution.’
    • ‘Mary appeared again at the marriage feast at Cana, and initiated the first miracle attributed to Jesus.’
    • ‘It describes the nature of Divine intervention, miracles, and communications.’
    • ‘The greatest miracle of God is when people are transferred from one kingdom into another kingdom.’
    • ‘Even so-called miracles are explicable in terms of natural phenomena.’
    • ‘Amongst them I perform the miracle of loaves and fishes.’
    • ‘Many miracles were attributed to him after his passing and he was greatly venerated and remembered in England.’
    • ‘This means, for example, that one may not say that the divine person performed miracles, since one may not separate divinity and humanity.’
    • ‘The miracle of the loaves and fishes was a card trick by comparison.’
    • ‘Sir Isaac Newton is enlisted to debunk magic, miracles and divine intervention, but we are not told why Newton remained a devout Christian to his life's end.’
    supernatural phenomenon, mystery, prodigy, sign
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A highly improbable or extraordinary event, development, or accomplishment that brings very welcome consequences.
      ‘it was a miracle that more people hadn't been killed or injured’
      • ‘The Irish economic miracle - and miracle it is - is based on extensive growth.’
      • ‘But the same media gave little or no attention to the economic miracle that has taken place in this country over the past decade.’
      • ‘With a miracle of even greater proportions required to propel his new side to similar glories, he is keen just to focus on the next round.’
      • ‘In New Zealand, so they tell us, an economic miracle has been performed and a dream world has been created which is the envy of the entire globe.’
      • ‘But it will be a small miracle if they manage to retain their collective sanity on the way.’
      • ‘After a lot of hard work and a few amazing fundraising miracles by the team, we've finally agreed on the dates and the detail and have a proposal to present to potential corporate sponsors.’
      • ‘A further consequence of the great migration, although it has to be taken in conjunction with the economic miracle, was mass consumer society.’
      • ‘I mean the fact that she and I don't get along well and can stay as friends for so long is an absolute miracle, amazing.’
      • ‘The economic miracle has yet to weave its magic.’
      • ‘By some miracle, I find my hotel, but only after driving around the airport for about an hour and going in circles.’
      • ‘Unless there's a miracle of some kind, it will represent a very significant missed opportunity for Toronto.’
      • ‘If that is done it can work an economic miracle and salvage long traditions that have served generations of people.’
      • ‘This is another amazing miracle of the Australian Economy.’
      • ‘As a consequence, the miracles that most frequently came up in the interviews were miracles in the economic sphere.’
      • ‘Conventional wisdom has it that this kind of government intervention helped to create the East Asian economic miracle.’
      • ‘The truth was that, despite economic miracles, we were surrounded by social problems ranging from drugs and joyriding to sex abuse and homeliness.’
      • ‘I still wait in anticipation and hope for a miracle that may bring us back together.’
      • ‘This will be one of the economic miracles of the world, all based on privatization.’
      • ‘Enormous changes that you've hoped for - perhaps your own personal miracle - can occur.’
      • ‘Prussia had improved its standing in Germany not only by its economic miracle but also by its diplomatic shrewdness.’
    2. 1.2An amazing product or achievement, or an outstanding example of something.
      ‘a machine which was a miracle of design’
      [as modifier] ‘a miracle drug’
      • ‘But unfortunately there's no miracle pill or tonic that can cure your stress woes.’
      • ‘The new miracle drugs are genetic-based, promising better outcomes for smaller groups of patients with particular genes.’
      • ‘When it was first discovered, cortisone seemed like a miracle drug, especially at high doses.’
      • ‘The day marks a fresh start for a canal hailed as a miracle of engineering when it opened in 1804.’
      • ‘Although popular mythology credits Alexander Fleming, it was Florey and his team who gave the world the miracle drug, penicillin.’
      • ‘All they are interested in is pushing some expensive new miracle pill on you.’
      • ‘It's a miracle of modern technology, and a highly technical gadget - hence why I was attracted to it.’
      • ‘Secondly, the press this week hailed cannabis as a wonder drug and a miracle cure.’
      • ‘It moves in an unpredictable fashion more suggestive of an intoxicated sailor than a miracle of modern engineering.’
      • ‘A Formula One engine is a miracle of modern engineering.’
      • ‘Toxic treasure: poisons and venoms from deadly animals could become tomorrow's miracle drugs.’
      • ‘Dad gave the miracle drug to everyone in the family because he had friends in the company that was developing it.’
      • ‘The first Model T Ford rolled off the assembly line in 1908 and was a miracle of mass production.’
      • ‘A miracle of modern technology, it is creating a buzz in markets with its continuing innovations and frequent modifications.’
      • ‘The building's very existence is a miracle of logistics and perseverance.’
      • ‘We should not be expecting instant medical miracles from stem cell research.’
      • ‘Doctors and scientists are divided on the merits of searching for the miracle cure.’
      • ‘Scottish consumers can at last get their hands on the miracle skincare product coveted by the rich and famous.’
      • ‘I even consider buying those miracle weight-loss pills - if only I had enough cash.’
      • ‘Many modern medical miracles occur in hospitals, unfortunately a few tragedies also occur.’

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin miraculum object of wonder from mirari to wonder from mirus wonderful.

Pronunciation:

miracle

/ˈmirək(ə)l/