Main definitions of mint in US English:

: mint1mint2

mint1

noun

  • 1An aromatic plant native to temperate regions of the Old World, several kinds of which are used as culinary herbs.

    Genus Mentha, family Labiatae (or Lamiaceae; the mint family): several species and hybrids, in particular the widely cultivated common mint or spearmint (M. spicata) and peppermint (M. × piperita). The mint family, the members of which have distinctive two-lobed flowers and square stems, includes numerous aromatic herbs, such as lavender, rosemary, sage, and thyme

    • ‘While I was out there I pruned back the mint, rosemary and oregano plants which were past their best.’
    • ‘Chives, marjoram, mint, oregano, parsley, sage, tarragon, and thyme are good choices for a sunny kitchen windowsill.’
    • ‘You can smell the mint, basil, and dill intermixing together and providing the outside with their spicy, sweet scents.’
    • ‘If space limits you to only three herbs, plant mint, parsley, and thyme.’
    • ‘For healthy apple trees, plant some nasturtiums and mint around the trunks to deter woolly aphids.’
    • ‘A tip here would be to bury an empty coffee can and plant the mint in it.’
    • ‘The crops most suited to water culture include lettuce and some herbs as watercress and mint.’
    • ‘Herbs like dill, mint and cumin were also highly prized.’
    • ‘Among the favorites are asters and daisies, milkweeds, mustards, mints, peas, and vervains.’
    • ‘This method works well with groundcovers and other plants that spread quickly, such as creeping thyme, mints, lamb's ears, ajuga, vinca, mums, asters, and daisies.’
    • ‘The Shakespeare Garden is planted with herbs referred to by Shakespeare in his plays, including mint, camomile, marjoram and lavender.’
    • ‘We live in an apartment, and although we do grow some things - mint, sage, thyme, tarragon, rosemary - rhubarb is not one of them.’
    • ‘Marjoram is an aromatic mint, so it has digestion-soothing benefits that are similar to peppermint's.’
    • ‘Certain families of plants dominate the list, such as the carrot family and the mints.’
    • ‘You can start some herbs, such as thyme, mint and rosemary, from cuttings or from young plants you buy at a florist or greenhouse.’
    • ‘Chives, sage, mint, and basil are good choices for a child's garden.’
    • ‘Harvest culinary and medicinal herbs like lemon balm, mint, French tarragon, summer savory and basil before they go to seed.’
    • ‘Choose five of the following fresh herbs: flat-leaf parsley, chives, mint, chervil, basil, dill, tarragon.’
    • ‘After trimming the mint plant I put that in the sun room.’
    • ‘I could smell his cologne; it reminds me of pine trees and mint that he planted a couple of summers ago.’
    1. 1.1 The flavor of mint, especially peppermint.
      ‘a tasty mint and chocolate flavored cone’
      • ‘I distracted her with some of my famous mint chip ice cream, and she left with no more questions.’
      • ‘He went to his best shopping spots and picked up a grand total of two books, a new cap, a mint flavoured ice cream and a new Bad Religion album.’
      • ‘There's simply no maintaining a healthy diet down the shore, which is why a chocolate mint lollipop twice the size of my eyeball seemed irresistible.’
      • ‘The green mint ice cream is the sea, the sorbet the iceberg.’
      • ‘The flavours are plentiful with raspberry, blackberry, chocolate and mint coupled with prickly, tarty little tannins.’
      • ‘I could have at least got mint flavoured or cinnamon.’
      • ‘He tasted faintly of chocolate with a hint of mint flavoured toothpaste.’
      • ‘The flavours available are mint, strawberry, apple, grape and believe it or not, cappuccino too.’
      • ‘He was close enough that I could smell the mint on his breath from the chewing gum.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, the ice cream - Neapolitan topped off with a mint and pistachio top layer - was sweet, firm and delicious.’
      • ‘Although mint is problematic, chewing gum actually can help heartburn symptoms.’
      • ‘We had ordered blackberry consommé with a pear sorbet and warm dark chocolate torte with fresh mint ice cream.’
  • 2A peppermint candy.

    • ‘Other foods studied, such as chocolate, crisps, chewing gum and mints, increased flavour without limit when greater amounts were added.’
    • ‘In principle, I'm all for the after-dinner freebie: Bring on the petit fours, chocolate mints, toothpicks.’
    • ‘He is also responsible for designing the new packaging for Polo mints and Fruit Pastilles.’
    • ‘Their breakfast consisted of half a bag of stale chips, badly melted candy mints and a candy bar.’
    • ‘Chewing gum and mints are two examples of products that began to break the limited paradigm of taste.’
    • ‘Gelatin, an ingredient made from cow bones, is a frequent ingredient in yogurt, ice cream, mints, gummy candies, margarine, and the coatings on some gel caps.’
    • ‘This spring, Storck stakes a position between hard candy and strong mints with Icefresh.’
    • ‘There was a crowded table in the center filled with magazines and a basket of mints and candies.’
    • ‘So the daily posts will probably cease, as will the free mints on your pillow.’
    • ‘Drink liquids often or use gum, mints or hard candies to remove a bad taste in your mouth.’
    • ‘Also, keep a packet of mints or chewing gum in your bag in case you need to freshen up later.’
    • ‘Paste-type mixtures are also used for making sweets, especially mints.’
    • ‘I stayed clear of the sweets for fear of getting hooked but they looked great: carefully wrapped gold and silver parcels of chocolate almond bars, almond roccas, coconut brittle and chocolate mints.’
    • ‘They were without water and had only a couple of packets of mints between them for 24 hours before being rescued by a Sea King helicopter.’
    • ‘For example, one page from his book shows that just one black-and-white cookie has the same number of calories as two frozen yogurts, a large plate of fruit, six hard candies and eight chocolate mints.’
    • ‘There were a few large jars of boiled sweets in the window, chocolate limes and Everton mints.’
    • ‘Inside were a few hard candy mints, the kinds you get from restaurants, and pencil and a notebook.’
    • ‘She ordered a few cookies, a coffee with cream and three packets of sugar, an iced mocha, some chocolate lollipops, and after-coffee mints to finish the meal off.’
    • ‘Consumers can be rewarded for their participation with Molson Scratch Cards or handouts such as blinking buttons, tins of mints, key chains, beverage wrenches and T-shirts.’
    • ‘Just remember if you're going to church make sure you clean your teeth and purchase a packet of extra strong mints.’

Origin

Old English minte, of West Germanic origin; related to German Minze, ultimately via Latin from Greek minthē.

Pronunciation

mint

/mint//mɪnt/

Main definitions of mint in US English:

: mint1mint2

mint2

noun

  • 1A place where money is coined, especially under state authority.

    • ‘The Empire set up a large number of independent local mints that were authorized subject to some degree of imperial oversight to mint coinage more or less without restriction.’
    • ‘All Scots and foreign coins were then sent to the Scottish mint to be melted down and replaced by money issued by the English crown.’
    • ‘The book is richly detailed and aspires to be a comprehensive history of the mint, the coins it produced, and the people connected with it.’
    • ‘Near the end of the 3rd century some regional mints were coining over a million Antoninianus a year.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, more coin was coming to be made outside English mints, particularly in Scotland.’
    • ‘The mint expects to produce some 2.3 billion coins by the end of this year, rising to between 3.0 and 3.2 billion by 2004.’
    • ‘A mint produced gold, silver, and bronze coins of Cunobelin.’
    • ‘The US mint struck one billion dollar coins between 1989 and 2000; last year it exceeded that number in the first Sacagawea minting alone.’
    • ‘Britain forbade her colonies to set up their own mints; and British coins brought in by new colonists were soon sent home to pay for imports.’
    • ‘Certain areas suffered because of the proliferation of mints - money became devalued in many senses not least because the production of money appeared to have become a free-for-all.’
    • ‘By counterfeit coinage was meant not so much the striking of imitations from base metal (for which there is in fact very little extant evidence) as coins struck in mints not controlled by the king.’
    • ‘Round shapes with figural reliefs placed on the door of a mint obviously suggest coins, and this is far from accidental.’
    • ‘On November 26, French riot police broke through a picket line at a mint producing the new euro coins in Pessac, near Bordeaux.’
    • ‘The Argentinian mint has only ever issued three commemorative coins.’
    • ‘It has the one baht coin from the Paris mint set in it, and the plaque shows the funeral pyre.’
    • ‘The number of mints was carefully controlled and permission to subjects to strike coins granted sparingly: it was an indication of the weakness of government during Stephen's reign that so many magnates began to mint coins.’
    • ‘Although none of the money was used, the raid on the mint was viewed as theft of national property.’
    • ‘Many are walking advertisements for tattoo parlors and they make more money than the mint can print in a day.’
    • ‘Demand a percentage from someone who has discovered a legitimate way of minting money or you'll shut down the mint.’
    • ‘He added that the coin mint moved to that site in 1546, just before Edward VI became King, and the minting of coins halted there in 1554.’
    coinage factory, money factory, coining works
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1a mintinformal A vast sum of money.
      ‘the car doesn't cost a mint’
      • ‘It's called Midford Castle, and was built in the shape of an ace of clubs by a man who made a mint at gambling - not difficult to guess what his winning card was.’
      • ‘They made a mint out of New Zealand Rail, took their money, and left.’
      • ‘Sleazy mass-market fiction has made a mint out of fading glamour and the stories of Hollywood dreams gone amiss.’
      • ‘‘The Ford cost a mint, but even the pedals, the gearstick and the handbrake work,’ Raymonde said.’
      • ‘Can't help thinking Tony must have made a mint over the years, too.’
      • ‘Or might he succumb to the very real temptations of the big money in professional sport and make himself a mint?’
      • ‘Certainly, this was not the case where the husband went off to work and made a mint and the wife was left at home the whole period looking after the children.’
      • ‘Loudcloud was set up by Marc Andreessen, the man who made a mint out of Netscape.’
      • ‘I had been meaning to go, I really had… but then I missed the pre-registration deadline, so it was gonna cost a mint.’
      • ‘I withdraw some of my earlier curmudgeoning (although not all of it - the Games are still bound to cost a mint and cause lots of disruption).’
      • ‘But to Scotland's gambling fraternity, Henry Spurway is the friendly giant making a mint from the current wave of betting mania.’
      • ‘I could have made a mint being a fortune-teller, too - though I already would have known that.’
      • ‘This particular private investor has made a mint from investing in Workspace and now owns a sizeable stake.’
      • ‘Yes, a handful of tribes have made a mint, but only those that live near major cities and don't mind playing footsie with white government.’
      • ‘As a leading light of the Gucci house - which has made a mint out of our lust for leather - McCartney is a coup for the animal rights movement.’
      • ‘Citi still makes a mint - nearly $13 billion of net income in the first nine months of 2002.’
      • ‘If '50s record producers thought they could make a mint with a white kid who sang like a black man, why couldn't a white kid who played like a black man be big too?’
      • ‘He told me he's thinking of moving out from Potters' Bar to Hertford, because he made a mint on his property.’
      • ‘I've been recycling Enid Blyton plots for years and made a mint.’
      • ‘Across the ocean, she found benevolent employers and - it's rumoured - made a mint from the real estate of the title.’
      a fortune, a vast sum of money
      View synonyms

adjective

  • (of an object) in pristine condition; as new.

    ‘a pair of speakers including stands, mint, $160’
    • ‘It is a great second box set of 3 records, mint.’
    • ‘Offered for sale are Disney Toy Story 8 miniature figurines, mint, in the original box.’
    brand new, as new, pristine, perfect, immaculate, unblemished, undamaged, untarnished, unmarked, unmarred, unused, fresh, first-class, excellent
    View synonyms

verb

[with object]
  • 1Make (a coin) by stamping metal.

    • ‘Moreover, their date cannot really be established, since the scratchings could have been made decades after the coins were minted.’
    • ‘Two thousand years ago, Jews minted coins on the Golan, the same place where, 30 years ago, Israeli tanks fought fierce battles to stop the Syrians from shelling the kibbutzes in the valley below.’
    • ‘In gold, this coin was minted to commemorate the defeat of the Ashirgarh Fort.’
    • ‘The first indigenous Scottish coins were minted in 1135 during the reign of David I, with successive Scottish monarchs introducing new features.’
    • ‘However, neighbouring countries such as Vietnam and Cambodia were already minting their own coins, and international traders were also desirous of indigenous flat silver coins.’
    • ‘Legend has it that each new Governor would mint his own coins but local people kept using bread as their currency regardless.’
    • ‘The coins were minted by the Royal Mint and are legal tender.’
    • ‘Part of that work included designing a graphic of all of the steps that go into minting a coin, a complex process that few of the individual employees understood from start to finish.’
    • ‘The earliest known Irish coins were minted by Sihtric Olafsson in the Viking kingdom of Dublin after 990 and were copies of English silver pennies.’
    • ‘These portrait coins were minted from 814 to 818, and it was probably during this period that Louis also struck a splendid gold coinage.’
    • ‘In fact, a Bulgarian coin was minted in the 1930's with a picture of the relief credited to Khan Krum.’
    • ‘The last silver coins were minted with the date 1964.’
    • ‘In addition, the gold florin, the local coin minted by Florentine guilds, became the standard currency of Europe and one of the first since Roman times to be used so widely.’
    • ‘They included interpreters, smiths to mint coins, and Munshi to write the king's Persian correspondence to the Mughal governor of Kashmir.’
    • ‘He and his heirs maintained a remarkable consistency in size and weight, and all coins were minted by strictly controlled moneyers in boroughs and other local centres.’
    • ‘A century on King Midas of Lydia was the first to mint coins of silver and gold and in the same century the Athenians added the refinement of having devices on both sides.’
    • ‘It should be noted that E. F. Kankrin, then the Russian minister of finance, made use of Goethe's advice to mint coins in platinum.’
    • ‘The economic status of Ipswich in the Late Saxon Age is seen in the number of moneyers minting coins there.’
    • ‘Most countries that switch continue to mint their own coins, however.’
    • ‘But there are also plenty of away-from-the-computer projects, such as drawing monarch butterflies and minting your own coins.’
    coin, stamp, stamp out, strike, cast, punch, die, forge, make, manufacture, produce
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Produce for the first time.
      ‘an example of newly minted technology’
      • ‘And in the same vein when I checked my newly minted phrase I found someone had both beaten me to it and written better about than I ever could.’
      • ‘The plot may borrow from Isaac Asimov and the theme, ‘make love not war’ is not original, but as presented by Sir Alan, it comes up newly minted, fresh and pleasurable.’
      • ‘Also, words and phrases rarely appear out of nothing, newly minted and ready for use.’
      • ‘Let's talk about Beauty and the Beast, newly minted in the second of Disney's ‘Platinum Edition’ DVD packages.’
      • ‘For the most part they were young, extremely talented and well educated, their heads full of newly minted, ambitious visions.’
      • ‘In the meantime, you can catch this newly minted member of the Order of Canada doing what he does best this Saturday night.’
      • ‘For those kids who would be the next Dizzee Rascal, music isn't the soundtrack to a shopping experience; once again, it feels fresh, newly minted.’
      • ‘New English words are being minted at a rate not seen since Shakespeare's time.’
      • ‘The 25-year-old full screen image looks newly minted and could pass for having been shot recently.’
      • ‘In 1936, the newly minted but not yet crowned Edward VIII was having a torrid affair with a twice divorced American lady named Wallis Simpson.’
      • ‘As with most newly minted 5.1 mixes from the '80s, this soundtrack's biggest boost comes from the rock songs and music score.’
      • ‘Father Collins, North Fork's newly minted, liberal priest, finds himself filled with doubt about his calling.’
      • ‘But in the newly minted US, music is mainly a matter of a jig or a reel from a fiddler at a dance - and, above all, of hymns in church.’
      • ‘Foxworthy was also preaching to the newly minted white middle class, those who had ditched the pickup for an Audi and their ancestral segregation for affirmative action.’
      • ‘Making matters worse is the increasing number of newly minted M.B.A.s flooding the market, adding to the competition for the few high-level jobs available during this period of corporate cutbacks.’
      • ‘The newly minted 26-year-old CSC team leader has all the makings of a winner.’
      • ‘Only the icons, also for sale, looked newly minted, unconnected with obsolete dreams of empire, transcending the rotary phone and the swastika.’
      • ‘Being a newly minted attending I couldn't just show up for work in a pink oxford button-down with a flamingo-encrusted bow tie, so I decided to put on a suit.’
      • ‘He ponders this newly minted epithet with a real sense of fun.’
      • ‘Back when I started, I was a newly minted second-year medical student looking for a creative outlet and distraction from studying for her Immunology final.’
      create, invent, make up, think up, dream up, hatch, devise, frame, originate, come up with, fabricate, fashion, produce
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • in mint condition

    • (of an object) new or as if new.

      • ‘Hidden among papers, magazines, books, and correspondence from a remote age, there are the first three issues, in mint condition, unread and untouched for decades.’
      • ‘On the other hand, not only were the shells in mint condition, they were found in bunkers constructed in the late 1990s, proving that they must have been handled relatively recently.’
      • ‘Despite the terrible weather that hit the county this week, the surface at the JP O Sullivan Park was in mint condition.’
      • ‘If, however, you really want your luggage to be first off the plane, and guarantee it arrives in mint condition, pack your kit in a cardboard box tied closed with string.’
      • ‘Even in mint condition and in the substantial numbers of pre-Desert Storm days, such rockets represent a very limited threat.’
      • ‘Bike lover Tom Hurst's classic dream machine is in mint condition - despite being buried for 34 years under a patio.’
      • ‘He prides himself on keeping them all in mint condition.’
      • ‘It's exceptionally well decorated on the inside and obviously in mint condition.’
      • ‘It was a late Nineties model 911 Turbo in mint condition.’
      • ‘The three ten-inch records are in mint condition and the sleeve pre-dates the Disney logo, which can only add to its potential value.’

Origin

Old English mynet ‘coin’, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch munt and German Münze, from Latin moneta ‘money’. The adjective derives from an elliptical use of in mint condition.

Pronunciation

mint

/mint//mɪnt/