Main definitions of micrometer in English

: micrometer1micrometer2

micrometer1

(also micrometer caliper)

noun

  • A gauge that measures small distances or thicknesses between its two faces, one of which can be moved away from or toward the other by turning a screw with a fine thread.

    • ‘Diameters of the potato tuber were scanned by moving a laser micrometer along the longitudinal axis of the tuber at constant speed, and tuber volume was evaluated as an aggreg ate of thin discs.’
    • ‘The thickness of both wing webs was measured by a pressure-sensitive micrometer before injection.’
    • ‘The company also relies on laser micrometers to accurately measure tube diameters to five decimal places.’
    • ‘The tumor thickness was measured with an ocular micrometer from the most superficial layer of mucosal epithelium, ulcer base, or granular layer of squamous mucosa, to the deepest invasive tumor cell.’
    • ‘The response was elicited by challenging the ears with oxazolone on Day 15, and the peak of the ear swelling reaction was measured with the spring micrometer between 16 and 24 h.’
    • ‘The lengths were measured with an ocular micrometer fitted to the eye-piece of the microscope.’
    • ‘The length of DNA migration in the comet tail, which is an estimate of DNA damage, was measured using an ocular micrometer.’
    • ‘For each species, the length and breadth of five seeds were measured with a micrometer and averaged.’
    • ‘Prof Rainey also examined more than 1,200 leaves of paper, even using a micrometer to measure the thickness of every sheet, as well as recording their height, width, watermarks, chainlines and other properties.’
    • ‘An index of intensity of the response to the mitogenic stimulation of T-cells was estimated as the change in thickness, measured with a pressure-sensitive micrometer, of the right wing web minus the change in the left wing web.’
    • ‘The thickness of subepithelial collagen fibrosis in the gastric biopsies stained with Masson trichrome was measured with an ocular micrometer.’
    • ‘Picard devised a micrometer to measure the diameters of celestial objects such as the Sun, Moon and planets.’
    • ‘The length and width of anthers were measured with a micrometer under a stereomicroscope.’
    • ‘Whatever it is, only a micrometer could measure it.’
    • ‘Using a micrometer to measure the field diameter of the microscope is recommended.’
    • ‘Polished thin sections were produced using epoxy resin as an embedding and mounting medium with a thickness of 30 m, measured by micrometer and polished using 0.05 m aluminium oxide so that no scratches remained.’
    • ‘Finally, you can outside neck turn the brass if the lot indicates a severe lack of uniformity when measured with a proper micrometer.’
    • ‘The tractor mechanism slowly pulls the fiber from the heated preform blank and is precisely controlled by using a laser micrometer to measure the diameter of the fiber and feed the information back to the tractor mechanism.’
    • ‘A microscope with a calibrated eyepiece micrometer was used to measure the spheroid diameter.’
    • ‘The surface area of allergic mucin per slide was measured with an ocular micrometer, quantitated, and averaged for each case, then compared between the 2 groups.’

Main definitions of micrometer in English

: micrometer1micrometer2

micrometer2

(also μm)

noun

  • One millionth of a meter.

    • ‘A pixel density of 2,500 pixels per square millimeter corresponds to a pixel size of only 20 micrometers.’
    • ‘On top of the lead, they spread a grid of tiny magnetic dots, each measuring 800 nanometers across and separated from its neighbors by 1.5 micrometers.’
    • ‘Typically, the in-plane resolution is several hundreds of micrometres with observed slices of several millimetres thickness.’
    • ‘That distance varies from a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers, depending on atom velocity.’
    • ‘With the laser's ability to be focused to points of a few micrometres or millimetres in diameter, high power densities can be spatially confined to heat target tissues.’
    • ‘Challenge: today's chips contain millions of elements with features as small as a fraction of a micrometer (millionth of a meter), projected by visible light.’
    • ‘Fully grown individuals range in size from about 100 micrometers to almost 20 centimeters long.’
    • ‘Discovered by an international team of Russian, Norwegian, British and US geoscientists, the diamond fragments at only 20-80 micrometres in size are too small to see without a microscope.’
    • ‘Particles between 0.05 micrometres and one micrometre scatter light and radiation, aiding atmospheric reactions.’
    • ‘These microscopic organisms, typically 1-5 micrometres long, are distinguished by the absence of sub-cellular organelles, such as a nucleus, mitochondria, and chloroplasts.’
    • ‘In the part of the infrared spectrum trapped by CO2-wavelengths between 13 and 19 micrometres - they found that between 1970 and 1997 less and less radiation was escaping.’
    • ‘Bacteria or viruses would usually be delivered in a finely-dispersed aerosol with liquid droplet sizes ranging from 1 to 5 micrometres - small enough to enable penetration deep into the lungs.’
    • ‘In fact, it can exhibit ordered structures with length scales ranging from micrometers to nanometers.’
    • ‘Next, the researchers measured profiles of the bullets' surface ridges and grooves to accuracies of 20 nanometers in depth and a few micrometers across the surface.’
    • ‘Pore length was measured as the length of the stomatal pore in micrometres.’
    • ‘In this case, the pore fluids precipitate minerals as fast as the fractures are opening, which may happen in multiple episodes, such that the actual space between the facture walls never exceeded a few nanometres or micrometres.’
    • ‘Setae range in length from a few micrometers to several millimeters.’
    • ‘On a weight basis, a billion ultra-fine particles are about equivalent to one coarse particle 10 micrometres in diameter, but have one thousand times the surface area.’
    • ‘One micrometer is about the size of an average bacterium.’
    • ‘A careful adjustment of the experimental exchange times should allow the detection of confined motions for typical distance scales between nanometers and micrometers.’