Definition of metamorphosis in English:

metamorphosis

noun

Zoology
  • 1(in an insect or amphibian) the process of transformation from an immature form to an adult form in two or more distinct stages.

    • ‘If sufficient stimuli are present, the physiological process of metamorphosis is initiated within the larvae.’
    • ‘All flies undergo complete metamorphosis with egg, larval, pupal, and adult stages in their development.’
    • ‘During the final instar, the tissues within the larval cuticle change to those of the adult, a process known as metamorphosis.’
    • ‘the larval forms of insects, but also of certain other creatures which undergo the process of metamorphosis in reaching the adult form.’
    • ‘This is followed by a discussion of metamorphosis in insects and amphibians.’
    1. 1.1 A change of the form or nature of a thing or person into a completely different one, by natural or supernatural means.
      ‘his metamorphosis from presidential candidate to talk-show host’
      • ‘Larry, of course, has gotten a few laughs out of Laurie's metamorphosis.’
      • ‘Table 4 captures this metamorphosis in major party support in a different way.’
      • ‘When it comes to national security, however, no one can say with assurance whether her metamorphosis is genuine.’
      • ‘Later, we see her in real terror as Namtar's metamorphosis takes hold and changes her very being.’
      • ‘After the second-half metamorphosis, it has suddenly become clear that there will be real competition for places come the summer.’
      • ‘This metamorphosis has happened because while I'm happy to embrace country living I like it to be wrapped up in a duck-down duvet of urban comfort.’
      • ‘The credits went through a handful of metamorphoses before the show debuted in summer 2007.’
      • ‘Yet a slow but steady metamorphosis is taking place.’
      • ‘Poster proceeds to outline his own metamorphosis over nine chapters.’
      • ‘The derision into which the Cult of the Supreme Being fell after the overthrow of the Jacobins did not discredit the theme, which underwent a series of conservative metamorphoses in the 19th century.’
      • ‘It uses the narrative as a way to investigate the notion of architectural metamorphosis and redemption, and it does so by means of powerful installation pieces.’
      • ‘Moralising interpretations generally explained physical metamorphosis as the external manifestation of the bestial nature within.’
      • ‘A close examination of the fresco reveals a series of allusions to metamorphosis.’
      • ‘In its metamorphosis from novella to film, it wisely maintains the convention of narration, but unwisely pushes it to the wayside.’
      • ‘So what kind of metamorphosis does the photograph as a form of animation effectuate?’
      • ‘The cast handle this metamorphosis excellently.’
      • ‘Although he has seemed to stay frozen in time, Bond has actually undergone a series of very subtle metamorphoses.’
      • ‘This political metamorphosis is not the one chronicled this week by the mainstream press in both Mexico and the United States.’
      • ‘The twist is that this metamorphosis is emphasized by the fact that the young heroine, Ginger, is simultaneously becoming a werewolf.’
      • ‘That, then, is the latest metamorphosis of ‘base football player’.’
      transformation, mutation, transmutation, transfiguration, change, alteration, conversion, variation, modification, remodelling, restyling, reconstruction, reordering, reorganization, sea change
      transmogrification
      transubstantiation
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek metamorphōsis, from metamorphoun transform, change shape.

Pronunciation

metamorphosis

/ˌmedəˈmôrfəsəs/