Definition of mesenchyme in English:



  • A loosely organized, mainly mesodermal embryonic tissue that develops into connective and skeletal tissues, including blood and lymph.

    • ‘The subcoelomic mesenchyme is defined as the layer of tissue that lies underneath the mesothelial surface of the peritoneum.’
    • ‘One type tends to form surface tissues or epithelium, the other becomes mesenchyme, the tissue that holds us together and becomes blood vessels.’
    • ‘That of course takes the problem back in time as to where or what organized the collagenous lattice in the dermal mesenchyme, but let's not get into that.’
    • ‘Classical embryology long ago demonstrated that grafting dental epithelium onto non-dental mesenchyme could produce tooth-like structures if the experiment were performed early enough in development.’
    • ‘Mutations that disrupt the signaling interactions between epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme can cause eyelid closure defects.’
    • ‘The critical process depends upon whether the ectoderm can contact a condensate of specialized mesenchyme called the dermal papillae.’
    • ‘To understand the origins of complexity in metazoan body plans, then, we must find where these tissues came from; that is, how epithelia and mesenchyme arose.’
    • ‘The lenticular process is actually derived from mesenchyme attributed to the second branchial (hyoid).’
    • ‘The mammary glands also develop under sequential reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and adjacent mesenchyme.’
    • ‘There is some mesenchyme in the core toward the base, however, they are very different in structure.’
    • ‘The intervertebral discs develop embryologically from both the mesenchyme (the annulus fibrosus) and the notochord (the nucleus pulposus).’
    • ‘What's more, these commands are part of the developmental vocabulary of mesenchyme cells generally, and are understood in more or less the same way throughout the embryo.’
    • ‘The mesoderm also provides the mesenchyme (by sinking of cells from its epithelium into the extracellular matrix) from which organ development becomes possible.’
    • ‘In the sea-urchin embryo, for instance, the primary mesenchyme originates from epithelial cells of the blastula by their losing cadherins and producing enzymes that allow them to invade the basal lamina.’
    • ‘Derived from embryonic mesoderm, mesenchyme is the first connective tissue formed.’
    • ‘Other matrix proteins, such as fibronection, are also present throughout developing lung mesenchyme and at tips of secondary septae in the alveolar stage.’
    • ‘These are lined by a thick layer of nasal epithelium surrounded by the mesenchyme of the placode.’
    • ‘Fertilization occurs in the mesenchyme and the zygotes develop into ciliated larvae.’
    • ‘These include the epidermis and inner tunic and some mesenchyme derivatives which have differentiated into blood cells in the larva.’
    • ‘The branchial arches begin as cylindrical cores of mesenchyme sandwiched between continuous sheets of epidermal ectoderm and internal endoderm.’


Late 19th century: from Greek mesos middle + enkhuma infusion.