Definition of melon in US English:

melon

noun

  • 1The large round fruit of a plant of the gourd family, with sweet pulpy flesh and many seeds.

    • ‘Eat lots of bioflavinoid-rich fruit (cherries, melons, blueberries, strawberries, kiwi fruit and grapes) to protect the mucous membranes.’
    • ‘The bittersweet Limoncello is positively breathtaking with the ripe orange-fleshed melon and fat, sweet blackberries.’
    • ‘We offer samples of everything from cucumbers to sweet peppers to melons.’
    • ‘Fruits and vegetables that love long, warm summers - melons, gourds, and corn - typically do well here.’
    • ‘They lived with his father and mother, and began growing crops of sweet corn, melons, pomegranates, figs and dates.’
    • ‘Scoop the seeds from the melon, slice away the skin and cut the flesh into six thin slices.’
    • ‘Cantaloupe is a perfect mix with other melons and fruit - kiwi, bananas, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, grapes and raspberries, to name a few.’
    • ‘They also love ripe melons and bananas and grapes.’
    • ‘I preferred berries on shortcake with a big scoop of ice cream, but I had to admit those melons were sweet.’
    • ‘They love fruits such as grapes, apples, oranges and melons, and a variety of vegetables such as carrots, corn, peas and broccoli.’
    • ‘Fruits are plentiful, including mangoes, melons, oranges, bananas, and pineapples.’
    • ‘Don't rush the planting of sweet corn, melons, pumpkins and capsicums.’
    • ‘You'll discover winter melons that keep until Christmas, melons that taste like pineapples and melons sweeter than any you've ever tasted.’
    • ‘Fruits include the indigenous melons, grapes, mulberries, peaches, apricots, nectarines, and pomegranates, as well as medlars, persimmons, oranges, melons, and sweet lemons.’
    • ‘You know that the cherries are sweet, the ciabatta baked that morning and the melon so ripe that each slice will dissolve icily in your mouth.’
    • ‘If you've ever suffered poor fruit sets of apples, cherries, cucumbers, melons, or strawberries, the reason might be too few honeybees.’
    • ‘In the first section there were ripe melons, cantaloupe, pineapple, oranges, strawberries, plain and fruity yogurt, and fruit salad.’
    • ‘The fruits exported comprise apples, grapes, melons, limes, guavas, pear, sultans, lemons and plums.’
    • ‘When the tendril closest to a fruit turns brown and dries up, the melon is ripe.’
    • ‘There were stalls on all sides filled with ripe melons, crisp looking apples, fresh bananas and every type of bread possible.’
  • 2The Old World plant which yields the melon.

    Cucumis melo subsp. melo, family Cucurbitaceae: many varieties

    • ‘The simplest method of using the mesh is for straight fencing and trellising to support tomatoes, beans and other vining plants, such as cucumbers and even melons.’
    • ‘Bitter melon is a tropical relative of the cucumber.’
    • ‘It's not too late to plant more bush beans, summer squash, melons, peppers, eggplants, marigolds, zinnias, gomphrena, rudbeckia, coleus and caladiums.’
    • ‘Other skills, such as cultivating onions, giant leeks, melons, carnations, fuchsias and roses for competition, are honed on allotments.’
    • ‘The farms of Nixons, Swantons, Alex's, Stranos and Newlands roads are growing a variety of crops including sugar cane, peanuts, tomatoes, melons, pumpkins and maize.’
    • ‘In the early part of the 1800s, the area was extensively planted with maize, potatoes, kumara, taro, calabashes, melons and pumpkins.’
    • ‘The peas and other vines won't bother each other so go ahead and plan on planting cucumbers, melons or even squash together on the same trellis.’
    • ‘Bitter melon has climbing foliage that resembles that of its cousin, the cucumber.’
    • ‘Care should be taken to separate as widely as possible, melons, squashes, pumpkins, cucumbers, and others of that family, as any one grown near the other may ruin both as to flavor.’
    • ‘Plant melons, cucumbers, and other frequent water-users along one drip line or soaker hose; irrigate regularly.’
    • ‘Te Ati Awa had to step up their farming methods to grow enough produce for trade, and Barrett introduced melons, maize, cabbages, pumpkins and wheat especially for the export market.’
    • ‘Speeding along the route of the ancient Silk Road, we passed between irrigated fields of melons, cabbages and sunflowers, part of the great oasis stretching eastwards from Tashkent.’
    • ‘Dead, spiky thistles and small wild melons, which even sheep won't eat, are the only vegetation in Mr Grove's moonscape-like fields at Cowra, 250 km west of Sydney.’
    • ‘These people had taken the land for contract farming of melons and watermelons, and as the water level in the river rose, they were stranded.’
    • ‘We put wire fence in the middle of our beds, so tomatoes, cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, and other vine crops can grow vertically.’
    • ‘Derrick, a father-of-three with four grandchildren, grows tomatoes, cucumbers, gooseberries, aubergines and even melons in his greenhouse.’
    • ‘Smaller flowers on cucumbers and melons can be pollinated by removing the entire male flower.’
    • ‘The old walled garden is completely overgrown now but between 1880 and 1920 melons, cucumbers, vines and figs grew there.’
    • ‘The locusts eat everything, barley; wheat; melons; tobacco plants; strawberries; spruce and apple trees, even the laundry hanging out on the line.’
    • ‘Among the crops affected are wheat, barley, melons, pistachios, almonds, and pomegranates, the researchers say.’
  • 3Zoology
    A mass of waxy material in the head of dolphins and other toothed whales, thought to focus acoustic signals.

    • ‘Between the prominent melon and the beak was a crease, which placed the species within a distinct subset of beaked whales - the bottlenoses.’
    • ‘The clicks are beamed forward, with the oily melon serving as an acoustic lens and the bony forehead as a reflector.’
    • ‘This structure is derived from the melon of other odontocetes, and like the melon, may serve as a sort of acoustic lens.’
    • ‘The role of ‘acoustic fat’ is best known for dolphins, where it is found only in the mandibular channel and the melon.’
    • ‘Other delphinids possess a melon, but their rostrum is short and the bulging forehead merely gives the head a squared-off appearance.’
  • 4A large profit, especially a stock dividend, to be divided among a number of people.

    ‘you can just see them sitting around the room cutting up the melon in advance’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the tradition was that every year the Wall Street member firms would cut up the melon and distribute their earnings to partners in their firms.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from late Latin melo, melon-, contraction of Latin melopepo, from Greek mēlopepōn, from mēlon ‘apple’ + pepōn ‘gourd’.

Pronunciation

melon

/ˈmelən//ˈmɛlən/