Definition of medicine in English:

medicine

noun

  • 1The science or practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease (in technical use often taken to exclude surgery)

    • ‘The holistic therapies might lead medicine back towards the holism of the ancient systems.’
    • ‘Concern increased about the gap between academic medicine and practice.’
    • ‘He said they planned to take on extra clinicians in respiratory medicine, obstetrics and gynaecology.’
    • ‘Until then, I had considered medicine as merely a science used to heal human bodies.’
    • ‘There are many areas in which expectations differ over the practice of medicine.’
    • ‘Possible adverse events were detected by two nurses in medicine and surgery and two midwives in obstetrics.’
    • ‘The challenge is to develop models of care integrating nephrology and geriatric medicine.’
    • ‘The practice of medicine must comply with modern ethical standards.’
    • ‘That is sad because it negatively changes how medicine is practiced in this country.’
    • ‘These principles subsequently formed the basis of good medical practice in Western medicine.’
    • ‘As in all things in medicine, medical diagnosis requires prudence, and more than a modicum of common sense.’
    • ‘It is also useful for students and teachers of medicine and the biomedical sciences.’
    • ‘This has enabled me to learn at first hand about the practice of medicine.’
    • ‘After a varied career he decided to study medicine and entered general practice.’
    • ‘The interdependence is particularly evident in science and medicine.’
    • ‘Compared to the natural sciences and medicine, psychology is a relatively new field.’
    • ‘A few of them were practitioners of herbal medicine but most were ordinary, conventional citizens.’
    • ‘It may very well be that gene therapy is medicine's future; indeed our own future.’
    • ‘A sound knowledge of medical ethics is essential to the good practice of medicine.’
    • ‘I had recently been appointed as senior registrar in respiratory medicine and was keen to impress.’
    medical science, practice of medicine, healing, therapeutics, therapy, treatment, healing art
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  • 2A compound or preparation used for the treatment or prevention of disease, especially a drug or drugs taken by mouth.

    ‘give her some medicine’
    ‘your doctor will be able to prescribe medicines’
    • ‘If there are no improvements after several weeks, other medicines can be tried.’
    • ‘All the review really shows is the lack of good quality research on over the counter cough medicines.’
    • ‘The use of many complementary and alternative medicines remains controversial.’
    • ‘Early uses were medical, but it gradually came to be accepted as a food rather than a medicine.’
    • ‘She gave me her food and used the medicine to make me feel better.’
    • ‘She recommends taking the medicine with food at the first sign of cramping or nausea.’
    • ‘She said several of the people were on medication and had not been able to take their medicines.’
    • ‘Store medicines, vitamins and other potential poisons out of the reach of children.’
    • ‘They will ask you questions about your current and past health and any medicines you are taking.’
    • ‘Special restrictions exist on the prescription of medicines for drug addicts.’
    • ‘They understand the use of medicines because they are dealing with them all the time.’
    • ‘Lock up all drugs and medicines securely in a bathroom cabinet where they can't be reached.’
    • ‘If you remain well while on the medicines, the treatment should be continued.’
    • ‘In less urgent cases, treatment by medicines and vitamins may be a better option.’
    • ‘He or she may prescribe medicines, depending on the type of symptoms and their severity.’
    • ‘Drug companies are also striving to develop new medicines to treat unmet needs.’
    • ‘The most effective medicines aim to restore the balance of serotonin in the brain.’
    • ‘There are some medicines that can be useful to keep at home in case of minor accidents.’
    • ‘Inappropriate use of many medicines has led to ineffective treatment and drug resistance.’
    • ‘Treatments include preventative medicines and those for use in acute attacks.’
    medication, medicament, remedy, cure, nostrum, patent medicine, quack remedy, panacea, cure-all, placebo, drug, prescription, dose, treatment
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    1. 2.1 Healing substances or drugs collectively.
      ‘an aid convoy loaded with food and medicine’
      • ‘Aid agencies are already bringing clean water, medicine, food and clothes to the survivors.’
      • ‘Clean water, rather than food or medicine, was cited as the most acute need in southern and central Iraq.’
      • ‘They desperately need medicine and food - and I think they need toys for the children.’
      • ‘How will you get them food, medicine, and the consumer goods they have come to enjoy?’
      • ‘The lack of electricity, medicine, food and water will take many more lives in the weeks ahead.’
  • 3(among North American Indians and some other peoples) a spell, charm, or fetish believed to have healing, protective, or other power.

    ‘Fleur was murdering him by use of bad medicine’
    • ‘Every culture had its Shamans, who in turn took on the magic mantle of medicine.’
    • ‘They could be bribed to give you some bad medicine if someone wanted to be rid of you.’

Phrases

  • give someone a dose (or taste) of their own medicine

    • Give someone the same bad treatment that they have given to others.

      ‘tired of his humiliation of me, I decided to give him a taste of his own medicine’
      • ‘He would dearly love to get those two particular individuals in a dark alley and give them a taste of their own medicine.’
      • ‘Let's give them a taste of their own medicine then perhaps they may have a less arrogant attitude towards Britain.’
      • ‘Weathering the storm, Windermere then picked up the pace and gave Workington a taste of their own medicine.’
      • ‘After all that's happened to you, don't you want to give them a taste of their own medicine?’
      • ‘That's something you say when someone has done something to you, and you give them a taste of their own medicine.’
      • ‘I was just trying to give them a taste of their own medicine.’
      • ‘She liked to give them a taste of their own medicine.’
      • ‘I suggest we out this person and give them a taste of their own medicine.’
      • ‘But if Livingston had been caught on the hop, they gave Airdrie a taste of their own medicine a whole 60 seconds later.’
      • ‘Sometimes I wondered how our arrangement worked: they were allowed to tease me to no end but the moment I opened my mouth to give them a taste of their own medicine they'd pretend to be hurt.’
      get even, get even with, get back at, get, let someone see how it feels, get one's revenge, have one's revenge, take one's revenge, get one's revenge on, have one's revenge on, take one's revenge on, be revenged, be revenged on, revenge oneself, revenge oneself on, hit back, hit back at
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  • take one's medicine

    • Submit to something disagreeable such as punishment.

      • ‘He had an affair with a blonde teenager but took his medicine and kept his marriage together.’
      • ‘As long as we have a hearing and are treated fairly, we will take our medicine.’
      • ‘You made a call, acknowledged it was probably wrong and took your medicine with grace.’
      • ‘So I took my medicine and I'm on probation now for three years.’
      • ‘If he didn't then he should come clean and take his medicine as he so sanctimoniously advises all his politician friends to do.’
      • ‘Yet loyal to the last, Scotland's fans are prepared to take their medicine.’
      • ‘Gareth took his medicine and responded with a tremendous performance - the way you would expect a professional to do.’
      • ‘And he took his medicine, and learned from his mistakes, and didn't take his wounded ego to the media.’
      • ‘Considering the gravity of the previous night's debacle, we thought it a good idea to return to the scene of the crime, just to see how they took their medicine.’
      • ‘But he should write a fulsome letter of apology to the tour officials concerned, and just take his medicine.’
      accept one's punishment, take the consequences of one's actions
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Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin medicina, from medicus ‘physician’.

Pronunciation

medicine

/ˈmɛdəsən//ˈmedəsən/