Definition of means test in English:

means test

noun

  • An official investigation into someone's financial circumstances to determine whether they are eligible for a welfare payment or other public funds.

    • ‘Although the first £6,000 of savings is excluded from this means test, I view this inflated interest calculation as scandalous and shameful.’
    • ‘The proposed law would require a means test to determine whether a consumer can file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, which liquidates assets and eliminates debt, or a Chapter 13, which requires a repayment plan.’
    • ‘Assistance is available to one and two-parent families with children under the age of 18 years, or students under the age of 19 years, who pass a means test.’
    • ‘It is common to hear people say that the Government has decided to do this or that, for example, ‘the Government is introducing means tests for disability benefits’.’
    • ‘Some formerly high-earning but out-of-work debtors could still pass the means test because income will be calculated based on salary and wages for the six months prior to filing.’
    • ‘In the first place, a means test constitutes an arbitrary method for the distribution of losses.’
    • ‘However, it will not require a weekly means test - and the majority of pensioners will not have to notify changes in their financial circumstances for five years, the government has said.’
    • ‘The Bankruptcy Act will implement a means test to determine ability to shell out at least a portion of arrears.’
    • ‘The means test includes income from all sources and the value of their assets including house, stocks, shares, securities, cash in hand, in trust, lodged, on deposit or invested.’
    • ‘The means test itself is a fairly gentle one.’
    • ‘If a bankruptcy petition is challenged, the debtor must take a means test.’
    • ‘The new law uses a means test to determine ability to continue paying debts over an extended period of time.’
    • ‘No means test and no questions about how it's spent.’
    • ‘Mothers and infants were to be given free treatment but infants were covered only up to the age of six weeks rather than 16 years, and a means test of £600 was a central part of the scheme.’
    • ‘The means test, for example, makes no allowance for bankruptcies due to medical emergencies.’
    • ‘Thus, most programs that redistribute income involve a stigmatizing means test that identifies the recipients as having ‘lost out’ in pursuit of the American dream.’
    • ‘In addition, millions of married couples would not receive the new tax credit, either because they failed the means-test, or they had no school-age children.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Make (a welfare payment, etc.) conditional on a means test.

    ‘means-tested benefits’
    • ‘Also, anyone who has savings of between £3,000 and £8,000 will have their means-tested benefits reduced on a sliding scale.’
    • ‘If you have a low income you may be entitled to means-tested benefits which could top up your income.’
    • ‘It's hardly surprising that more than half the country's pensioners are entitled to means-tested benefits.’
    • ‘Instead, he penalises our savings and means-tests our benefits.’
    • ‘For this small group, a limited, means-tested Medicare drug benefit solves the problem.’
    • ‘It wouldn't be means-tested and it would rise in line with earnings.’
    • ‘You may no longer qualify for means-tested State benefits, or have to pay more tax.’
    • ‘Students from disadvantaged backgrounds will receive help with up to £1,125 of tuition fees, plus will have access to means-tested grants of £1,000 a year.’
    • ‘Hence the introduction of the means-tested Pension Credit in October 2003, estimated to cost £2 billion in its first year.’
    • ‘The minimum pension is typically means-tested for other sources of pension income and only available to workers when they reach a specific eligibility age.’
    • ‘Workers of my generation are going to be forced to pay into the state system all our working lives, to find that the pension is means-tested by the time we can claim it.’
    • ‘Did you know that more than half of Britain's pensioners are currently entitled to means-tested benefits?’
    • ‘All means-tested benefits combined would reduce the poverty rate by another 2.9 percentage points.’
    • ‘In addition to free tuition at undergraduate level, the principal support is a means-tested maintenance grant.’
    • ‘Almost 40% rely on means-tested government benefits, and unemployment is at 20%.’
    • ‘Another way to destroy the social insurance reality of social security is to means-test it.’
    • ‘However, many of these households are eligible for benefits from other means-tested programs.’
    • ‘It's tax-free and is not means-tested but is based on the level of care you need and whether it is day-time or night-time care, or both.’
    • ‘There was a general move toward means-tested provision of benefits.’
    • ‘However, they may count as income for some means-tested benefits.’
    1. 1.1Subject (someone) to a means test.
      • ‘The government will be means-testing half the entire pensioner population.’

Pronunciation:

means test

/ˈmēnz ˌtest/