Main definitions of mean in English

: mean1mean2mean3

mean1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Intend to convey, indicate, or refer to (a particular thing or notion); signify.

    ‘I don't know what you mean’
    ‘he was asked to clarify what his remarks meant’
    ‘I meant you, not Jones’
    • ‘And I understand perfectly what you mean about the characters being revolting.’
    • ‘‘I did know what you meant this afternoon,’ referring to our earlier conversation.’
    • ‘‘Hey freak,’ Jesse greeted, his tone implying that he had meant it strictly as an insult.’
    • ‘‘You're absolutely right ’, Devlin interrupted, genuinely getting what she meant.’
    • ‘It was a slow kiss, intended to mean a promise of a future together.’
    • ‘I'm not sure what Beckett meant by referring to our ‘showing off’, but let me now do so!’
    • ‘What did you mean when you said her emotion seemed more genuine in the last chapter?’
    • ‘Andrew didn't really know what the results meant because he didn't know what the normal values for the tests would be.’
    • ‘Ziana began to understand what her grandfather had meant by those words.’
    • ‘The question is whether that means it intends to triple its workforce.’
    • ‘They took his remark as a joke although he had meant it as a spurn to their stupidity.’
    • ‘The men had meant her clothing when they referred her to a boy.’
    • ‘Confused, he suggests she means his brother, who has just married Lucy Steele.’
    • ‘He means that death repeals the whole implied adventure of being missing, and a certain tantalising ambiguity enters the picture.’
    • ‘This could mean heaven, but most likely it represents a church.’
    • ‘Tash looked after her, wondering what she could have meant by her words.’
    • ‘Oh yes, she meant the children she supposedly tutored in the day.’
    • ‘The boy waved his hand in the air, indicating that he meant the alleyway, in which they stood.’
    • ‘Matt never quite understood what he had meant by those words.’
    • ‘She seemed to sigh heavily, and, from all my experience, I knew that heavy sighs meant that you had something bad to say.’
    signify, convey, denote, designate, indicate, connote, show, express, spell out, stand for, represent, symbolize, imply, purport, suggest, allude to, intimate, hint at, insinuate, drive at, refer to
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a word) have (something) as its signification in the same language or its equivalent in another language.
      ‘its name means “painted rock” in Cherokee’
      • ‘The word error once meant a wandering or roving course.’
      • ‘‘The last two words mean the same thing,’ I interrupted aggravatingly.’
      • ‘Obviously the word meant something different to him than it did to her.’
      • ‘Cadet, a 17th Century French word meaning a young trainee in the armed forces or the police force, is commonly used in India.’
      • ‘The word patriotism comes from a Greek word meaning fatherland.’
      • ‘The word magazine derives from an Arabic word meaning a storehouse, a place where goods are laid up.’
      • ‘I pressed the search button to see what the words meant and what language they were.’
      • ‘The name comes from the Greek word lithos which means stone.’
      • ‘This word means fiery ones, in allusion, as is supposed, to their burning love.’
      • ‘In short, they are ‘blogs,’ an invented word meaning Web diarist.’
      • ‘Parcours is a French word meaning the route, the trip or the journey.’
      • ‘The word icon comes from the Greek word eikon, which means image.’
      • ‘Lenin named his small movement the Bolsheviks, a word meaning majority.’
      • ‘The use of the original Greek word to mean an instrument of music did not occur until the 5th century ad.’
      • ‘Frass is an arcane English word meaning the excrement or droppings of insects.’
      • ‘The word is Japanese, meaning tray planting, but the practice originated in China.’
      • ‘The word also means a narrowing of the eyes so that you can get a clearer view, and an affliction where the eyes are not in line.’
      • ‘The word once meant the description of a work of visual art within a poem, but has come to mean poetic description more generally.’
      • ‘The word myco, is derived from the Greek word which means fungus.’
    2. 1.2 Genuinely intend to convey or express (something)
      ‘when she said that before, she meant it’
      • ‘‘Thank you,’ she said, and the genuine look in her eyes told me that she really meant it.’
      • ‘‘I'm glad to hear it,’ he replied, and the genuine smile he gave me let me know he meant it.’
      • ‘He knew these sounded empty, these words, but he meant them.’
      • ‘Mike had the feeling that, deep down inside, she genuinely meant it.’
      • ‘Riley wasn't just saying the words, he meant them too.’
    3. 1.3mean something to Be of some specified importance to (someone), especially as a source of benefit or object of affection.
      ‘animals have always meant more to him than people’
      • ‘This woman means a lot to me and I intend to make sure she's taken care of.’
      • ‘Thanks for everything you said, it really meant a lot to me.’
      • ‘It was apparent that this bet meant a lot to both of them.’
      • ‘It was only a momentary kiss but it meant a lot to me.’
      • ‘She and Ryan had always had a close bond that meant a lot to Ryan.’
      • ‘It meant a lot to him that she believed he could win.’
      • ‘But it still means a lot to the few people watching.’
      • ‘You always show you put thought into your review and that means a lot to me.’
      • ‘They had always meant a lot to her, she couldn't explain it.’
      • ‘Any other time, those words would have meant a lot to her.’
  • 2Intend (something) to occur or be the case.

    ‘they mean no harm’
    with infinitive ‘it was meant to be a secret’
    • ‘It wasn't meant to be intimate, but my hand was on his!’
    • ‘Talk them down if you would, tell them that we mean them no harm.’
    • ‘Fear rushed through him and he prayed that the person meant them no harm.’
    • ‘As one might expect, the work placed in medical environments was generally meant to be as innocuous as possible.’
    • ‘It's strange how someone can know there was a time quite recent you meant them harm, and still hold no grudge.’
    • ‘It's never a good sign when the audience audibly groans throughout what was meant to be a grand love story.’
    • ‘The movie is symbolic it's not meant to be a literal story.’
    • ‘I think it was meant to be taken a lot more lightly than I read it, but I can't help my own reaction to the film.’
    • ‘The law on sharing capital gains was meant to redistribute excess profit.’
    • ‘Today's rendition was meant to be more meaningful than those of other years.’
    • ‘I really get the impression that this is meant to be a representation of an event that happened.’
    • ‘Counseling is meant to be educational and to leave one with more positive feelings.’
    • ‘The difference between Akil, Agape, and the rest of the slaves, was that they understood d' Armano meant them no harm.’
    • ‘You can come with me to the Temple if you promise that you mean his girl no harm.’
    • ‘I mean no disrespect, but I wish to inform you that your request may not be wholly understood.’
    • ‘This show is meant to be the first of an annual series curated by the museum from its holdings.’
    • ‘They prayed and then cast a charm to pray that they would pass back to their world in peace and mean them no harm.’
    • ‘She believed that horses would be emotionally damaged if it was not explained to them that their riders meant no harm nor wished to degrade them in any way.’
    • ‘A doorway page is a page carefully designed to do well on search engine results, but is never meant to be used by humans.’
    intend, aim, plan, design, have in mind, have in view, contemplate, think of, purpose, propose, have plans, set out, aspire, desire, want, wish, expect
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1be meant to do something Be supposed or intended to do something.
      ‘we were meant to go over yesterday’
      • ‘We were meant to learn new things about how the organization formed and pursued its first tentative steps into space.’
      • ‘At first he sang mostly for the workers in the factories where he also was meant to be working.’
      • ‘Adam was meant to dig, not to drive round to the local gardening centre.’
      • ‘She didn't know where this place was that supposedly they were meant to go to, and because of that tried to push the thought out of her hyperactive head.’
      • ‘We were meant to meet the townspeople in just a few minutes, but at the rate we were going, they were going to be getting up and leaving before Al and I even got there.’
      • ‘The documentary is meant to expose the difficulties faced by the community especially women living in the area.’
      • ‘They were meant to make it to Rundalfelt by the next day, and Ariane seemed to become more excited if not scared with each step her horse took.’
      • ‘Yesterday he had seen, for the first time, the angry and distressed faces of the people he was meant to rule.’
      • ‘They all have a purpose: they're meant to teach us about life, to advise us, to give reasons as to why things are they way they are.’
      • ‘My first week passed in a blur, mainly caused by my confusion about what I was meant to do and not knowing who everyone was.’
    2. 2.2often be meant for Design or destine for a particular purpose.
      ‘the jacket was meant for a much larger person’
      • ‘I told him that garlic dipping sauce was meant for the sole purpose of dipping!’
      • ‘We wondered who the oversize sign was meant for.’
      • ‘Even with her hair falling messily out of a bun, no make-up, wearing a hoodie that was 2 sizes too big and sweat pants that I'm pretty sure were meant for a guy, she still managed to look beautiful.’
      • ‘They were meant for the military and universities: for calculating missile trajectories and looking for patterns in data.’
      • ‘He wondered what they were meant for and why paintings were even allowed in this building.’
      • ‘A few government officials have been arrested for stashing away relief material which were meant for victims of the earthquake such as tents, solar lanterns, milk powder, food packets and bed sheets.’
      • ‘The Marble Falls design is meant for business users, with two flat-screen displays and a small chassis.’
      • ‘They were meant for all the days they would be sailing and working.’
      • ‘Given that most of these types of games were meant for the PC, translating the interface to work with a console hasn't always worked.’
      • ‘The tables were meant for two people at each but because of the odd number of students in my class, I was left single.’
      destine, predestine, fate, preordain, ordain
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3mean something by Have as a motive or excuse in explanation.
      ‘what do you mean by leaving me out here in the cold?’
      • ‘Was it just her or had Trey meant something by that comment?’
      • ‘She hadn't meant any harm by the question, but he seemed to think so as he glared venomously at her, before replying.’
      • ‘‘I'm sure she didn't mean any harm by it,’ I replied.’
      • ‘He didn't mean any harm by it; he was just trying to get us here on time.’
      • ‘They assured me that they meant no offense by this.’
      • ‘I mean many things by this, which I hope to explore in the coming weeks and months.’
      • ‘Again, don't take this the wrong way, I mean no offense by it.’
      • ‘I meant no harm by my remark, but remember he's only a novice.’
      • ‘But I don't think Veronica meant any harm by it, and it was nice of her to try.’
      • ‘He smiled gently at her to show he meant no harm by his comments; he was just stating fact.’
      matter, have importance, have significance, be important, be significant
      View synonyms
  • 3Have as a consequence or result.

    ‘the proposals are likely to mean another hundred closures’
    with clause ‘heavy rain meant that the ground was waterlogged’
    • ‘In second period French, Jen hid the plan book, which meant no homework.’
    • ‘The downside though, is that it's likely to mean you'll be packing your own shopping if you choose to participate.’
    • ‘This means the Deputy Prime Minister is likely to get the top job when it opens up sometime over the next few years.’
    • ‘That is expected to mean a license fee of just shy of £200 early next decade once inflation is taken into account.’
    • ‘Soon January rolled around, bringing in a heavy blizzard, which meant there would be no school.’
    • ‘About 200 people are expected to turn up in all, and the popularity means this is likely to become a regular event.’
    • ‘The only good part about the rain was that it meant that the weather would be slightly less cold, but that, too had its downside.’
    • ‘Being interrogated by the two players had been interesting, but he would do it a hundred times if it meant being with Mandy.’
    • ‘He said the Danish result was likely to mean that Britain would not join the EMU as early as had originally been anticipated.’
    • ‘Christine not being here has meant a change of plan.’
    • ‘If handled properly it should certainly improve the cab company's efficiency and that means you won't have to wait in the rain so long.’
    • ‘This is likely to mean a greater spend on advertising and promotional activities.’
    • ‘It made critics happy, which means that producers are likely to be more confident in you the next time around.’
    • ‘That meant a day without work, without duty and without purpose.’
    • ‘The clouds were threatening to come in from the mountains and that meant rain and inside activity for the next day or so.’
    • ‘Unfortunately for the crowd on the stands, that meant warm blankets and numerous cups of hot chocolate.’
    • ‘However, this does mean the company expects its 2003 fiscal full year to show some growth.’
    • ‘The collapse in equities means it now represents 25 per cent of the fund's value.’
    • ‘This means it will achieve its total planned savings a year earlier than originally expected.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, it means that we will likely see more advertising in the movie theaters.’
    entail, involve, necessitate, lead to, result in, give rise to, bring about, cause, engender, produce, effect
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Necessarily or usually entail or involve.
      ‘coal stoves mean a lot of smoke’
      • ‘Either way, being a performer meant being involved in the compositional process.’
      • ‘A day out in Edinburgh does usually mean walking around the city, but suppose we just stayed in-doors.’

Phrases

  • I mean

    • Used to clarify or correct a statement or to introduce a justification or explanation.

      ‘I mean, it's not as if I owned property’
      • ‘By today, I mean the date at the bottom of the page, not the day I'm writing this, or whenever you may be reading it.’
      • ‘I saw this in a full theatre and when the unloaded gun is fired, everybody and I mean everybody moaned.’
      • ‘I never really had a childhood, I mean, lots of stuff happened to me when I was younger.’
      • ‘It's the least you can do for her, I mean, she let us in her house in the middle of the night.’
      • ‘She had four children, so I mean obviously four times she did have some kind of bodily intimacy.’
      • ‘That, I mean, that is one of the most fundamental misunderstandings of what we're proposing.’
      • ‘She's gonna be mad when she finds out, I mean how long have you known and not told her?’
      • ‘So you can imagine how I can hardly wait for school to start, I mean, I get to escape the craziness at home anyway.’
      • ‘I had to do something, I mean, I didn't want him to not have fun because of me.’
      • ‘See how the other plays so happily with the handler, she, the handler I mean, acts so friendly and kind to them.’
  • mean to say

    • usually in questionsReally admit or intend to say.

      ‘do you mean to say you've uncovered something new?’
      • ‘But I don't mean to say that I didn't enjoy the kiss.’
      • ‘I do not mean to say that such exclusions are absolute.’
      • ‘I don't necessarily mean to say that I feel that's right.’
      • ‘What you mean to say is that you intend to resist doing so, which I already knew.’
      • ‘Do you mean to say that we won't be involved in any of this attack?’
      • ‘You mean to say that nothing happened between you guys at all?’
      • ‘But just because 3 million people buy driving games every year, it doesn't mean to say that they're right.’
      • ‘Do you mean to say that you're not hated for what you did to Grant?’
      • ‘You mean to say that you have seen all the maids of the land?’
      • ‘‘You mean to say,’ in tones of mock-surprise, ‘that you do not know everything there is to know?’’
  • mean well

    • Have good intentions, but not always the ability to carry them out.

      • ‘The woman meant well, but always ended up criticising every little thing I did.’
      • ‘These editors mean well, they just don't know what they're doing.’
      • ‘He knew she meant well, but he couldn't face her.’
      • ‘I know you meant well, but why sacrifice yourself for me?’
      • ‘‘She always means well,’ Harry muttered in reply.’
      • ‘I'm sure she meant well, but that made me feel angrier than ever, made me feel that she didn't understand at all.’
      • ‘She was still pretty uptight, but she meant well.’
      • ‘Devon always means well, he doesn't like to hurt people.’
      • ‘I suppose he may have meant well, but he isn't exactly blessed with an abundance of tact.’
      • ‘He grinned, letting both females know he meant well.’

Origin

Old English mænan, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch meenen and German meinen, from an Indo-European root shared by mind.

Pronunciation

mean

/mēn//min/

Main definitions of mean in English

: mean1mean2mean3

mean2

adjective

  • 1British Unwilling to give or share things, especially money; not generous.

    ‘she felt mean not giving a tip’
    ‘they're not mean with the garlic’
    • ‘They were horrible - greedy and interfering, and mean and small-minded.’
    • ‘And if you keep being so mean with the price, people might be so angry about it, and they might even burn things down.’
    miserly, niggardly, close-fisted, parsimonious, penny-pinching, cheese-paring, ungenerous, penurious, illiberal, close, grasping, greedy, avaricious, acquisitive, scrooge-like
    View synonyms
  • 2Unkind, spiteful, or unfair.

    ‘it was very mean of me’
    ‘she is always mean to my little brother’
    • ‘I hope the other children aren't being mean to her.’
    • ‘He gave me a disappointed look and I felt guilty remembering all of the times I was mean to Corbin without an excuse.’
    • ‘It isn't any excuse for him to be mean to his daughter.’
    • ‘Jonah may always be mean to you, but that's still attention.’
    • ‘It made Jason sick to know that people were mean to her.’
    • ‘I felt a little bad about being so mean to him but he deserved it.’
    • ‘But you still shouldn't be so mean to them if they don't get something.’
    • ‘The author made you hate the evil sisters who were mean to Ella.’
    • ‘One wonders if, deep down, she couldn't stand being mean to her husband!’
    • ‘She is mean to Pip for most of his life, although at the novel's end they meet again, and she seems to be a softened, changed woman.’
    • ‘None of this would have happened if he hadn't been mean to her sister.’
    • ‘It was mean to laugh at her when she went but I didn't care.’
    • ‘She didn't know why, but for some reason she couldn't be spiteful or mean to this man anymore.’
    • ‘You know, people are usually mean to you for a reason.’
    • ‘That was probably why he had been so horribly mean to Conner in his room earlier.’
    • ‘I didn't want to be mean to Jes, but Morgan had taken over.’
    • ‘I hated him from then on because he was always mean to me.’
    • ‘She didn't mean to be mean and cruel but things slip once in while, things she can't control.’
    • ‘They also don't like pets and are mean to small children.’
    • ‘He looked like a nice guy, and he hadn't been mean to them.’
    unkind, nasty, spiteful, foul, malicious, malevolent, despicable, contemptible, obnoxious, vile, odious, loathsome, disagreeable, unpleasant, unfriendly, uncharitable, shabby, unfair, callous, cruel, vicious, base, low
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1North American Vicious or aggressive in behavior.
      ‘the dogs were considered mean’
      • ‘This person was also abusive, mean and vicious.’
      • ‘He was perfect in his stall but when he was on the track, he was mean and vicious.’
      • ‘Eventually, we learn that Monica is a mean, vicious vamp who places men under her power with a combination of humiliation and flabby thighs.’
  • 3(especially of a place) poor in quality and appearance; shabby.

    ‘her home was mean and small’
    squalid, shabby, dilapidated, sordid, seedy, slummy, sleazy, insalubrious, poor, sorry, wretched, dismal, dingy, miserable, mangy, broken-down, run down, down at heel
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 (of a person's mental capacity or understanding) inferior; poor.
      ‘it was obvious to even the meanest intelligence’
      • ‘She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper.’
      inferior, poor, limited, restricted, meagre
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2dated Of low birth or social class.
      ‘it was a hat like that worn by the meanest of people’
      lowly, humble, ordinary, low, low-born, lower-class, modest, common, base, proletarian, plebeian, obscure, undistinguished, ignoble
      View synonyms
  • 4informal Excellent; very skillful or effective.

    ‘he's a mean cook’
    ‘she dances a mean Charleston’
    • ‘I see someone funny and sweet who cooks a mean steak and does a lousy John Wayne impression.’
    • ‘They do a mean curry in this place, but I opt for a hot sandwich instead.’
    • ‘Day has an incredibly luminous screen presence, and in every scene they share, she matches Cagney's swagger with a mean strut of her own.’
    • ‘She was known to make a mean grilled cheese and would do so.’
    • ‘We opt for number two, and discover the dipso cooks a mean cheese omelette.’

Phrases

  • no mean ——

    • Denoting something very good of its kind.

      ‘it was no mean feat’
      • ‘This is no mean feat, considering the size and relative complexity of the cast.’
      • ‘They were holding their own which was no mean feat.’
      • ‘This small publisher, which brings out eight new titles a year, has made a name for itself and has had three of its books read or adapted on BBC Radio Four - no mean achievement.’
      • ‘And as far as negotiations go, it's no mean feat.’
      • ‘That's no mean feat in an industry that's growing by less than 2% a year.’
      • ‘Considering his prodigious consumption of alcohol and drugs, this was no mean feat.’
      • ‘Considering the guide price was £130,000, that was no mean feat.’
      • ‘For a twenty-five-year-old woman to transform herself into an eleven-year-old child was no mean achievement.’
      • ‘Physically imposing and capable of more than one facial expression, he even holds his own in the fight scenes, no mean feat given the martial calibre of the cast.’
      • ‘It is also very well recorded and that is no mean achievement.’

Origin

Middle English, shortening of Old English gemǣne, of Germanic origin, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin communis ‘common’. The original sense was ‘common to two or more people’, later ‘inferior in rank’, leading to mean (sense 3) and a sense ‘ignoble, small-minded’, from which mean (sense 1 and mean sense 2) (which became common in the 19th century) arose.

Pronunciation

mean

/min//mēn/

Main definitions of mean in English

: mean1mean2mean3

mean3

noun

  • 1The value obtained by dividing the sum of several quantities by their number; an average.

    ‘acid output was calculated by taking the mean of all three samples’
    • ‘Provided that the conditional mean was correctly specified, the model was consistent.’
    • ‘The means and coefficients of variation of output and input variables are reported in Table 1.’
    • ‘The median is a more conservative estimate of WTP than the mean, since it gives less weight to extreme observations on the high side.’
    • ‘A mean of 2.63 was reported for the number of courses completed.’
    • ‘The tests were all performed ten times and the mean of the measurements was taken as the result for the test.’
    • ‘Note that the displayed means are weighted means of the non-log version of the variable.’
    • ‘Such conditions produce overdispersion, wherein the variance exceeds the mean.’
    • ‘Profits per employee is the deviation from industry mean of the ratio of a firm's operation profits to total employees.’
    • ‘Our favored aggregate is the R2 weighted aggregation, but we also report the simple mean of the forecasts and the median.’
    • ‘The price may rise and fall, but the average mean is what the cost will turn out to be.’
    • ‘The cancer patients had used their phone for a mean of 2.8 years while the control group averaged 2.7 years.’
    • ‘Centering consists of subtracting the sample mean from each independent variable.’
    • ‘The mean and the mean of the sum of squares are combined into one loop through the entire data set.’
    • ‘Consider the jellybean example: if there is a large glass sphere hidden among the jellybeans, then you will get a normal distribution of guesses centred on the wrong mean.’
    • ‘These changes are evaluated at the mean of the explanatory variables.’
    • ‘The means associated with both dependent variables in all experimental conditions are presented in Figure 2.’
    • ‘The survey results for the means of each listed variable are reported in Table 3, Column 1.’
    • ‘There are two ways to calculate WTP from the estimated logistic function: its mean and its median.’
  • 2A condition, quality, or course of action equally removed from two opposite (usually unsatisfactory) extremes.

    ‘the mean between two extremes’
    middle course, middle way, mid point, central point, middle, happy medium, golden mean, compromise, balance, median, norm, average
    View synonyms

adjective

  • 1(of a quantity) calculated as a mean; average.

    ‘by 1989, the mean age at marriage stood at 24.8 for women and 26.9 for men’
    • ‘In dealing with commodities such as butter, we recognize patterns in charts and calculate the mean average over a period of time.’
    • ‘To control for the professional experience of the firm's founding team, I calculated the mean age for the set of founders for each law firm.’
    • ‘An additional year of age of a house lowers the estimated sales price by $1,230 evaluated at the observed mean values.’
    • ‘The mean residual values and the RSD were calculated for each weigh day.’
    • ‘We then calculated the mean multiplexity of the focal firm's network partners and used that as our measure of multiplexity.’
    • ‘There are no data produced on an annual basis that permit direct calculation of mean graduate and non-graduate earnings.’
    • ‘Sows housed in pens and stalls had similar mean values across all measures with each analysis that was used.’
    • ‘Teachers allowed drivers to drive tractors or other agricultural machinery at a mean age of 14.9.’
    • ‘Diamond found a negative relationship between aging and productivity and that the mean peak age for the citation stock for the six samples was 59 years of age.’
    • ‘In the meta-analysis, the mean value for a treatment within each paper was the experimental unit.’
    • ‘In the last ten years, the mean age of heroin users has dropped from 27 to 19.’
    • ‘In this study, 5-year moving averages are used to estimate the mean value of each commodity.’
    • ‘Of particular interest are the mean values of the surprise component, since they can be interpreted as the average forecast errors.’
    • ‘Fecal output was calculated by dividing mean chromium release rate by the concentration of chromium in the feces.’
    • ‘The mean age of respondents was 35.32 and the standard deviation was 14.29.’
    • ‘Table 2 presents the variables used, their mean values, and data sources.’
    • ‘You've quoted the mean average, but this is skewed by the small number of fanatics whose 5,000-plus discs line every wall of their homes.’
    • ‘Following convention, quantity terms were normalized using the data means to have mean values of one.’
    • ‘It was calculated by dividing hot carcass weight by the overall mean dressing percentage.’
    • ‘In Table 2 are shown mean values in the trimmed sample for selected characteristics.’
    average, median, middle, halfway, centre, central, intermediate, medial, medium, normal, standard, middling
    View synonyms
  • 2Equally far from two extremes.

    ‘hope is the mean virtue between despair and presumption’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French meien, from Latin medianus ‘middle’ (see median).

Pronunciation

mean

/min//mēn/