Main definitions of mate in English

: maté1mate2mate3

maté1

noun

  • 1An infusion of the leaves of a South American shrub, which is high in caffeine and bitter.

    • ‘Other dried plant substances used to make infused drinks are chicory (dried root), cocoa (dried powdered seeds), guarana (dried powdered seeds, made into smoked cakes), cola ‘nut’ (dried powdered seeds), and maté (dried leaves).’
    • ‘We drink it through a bombilla, the little metal suckable strainer they also use in Argentina to drink maté, an exuberantly undrinkable local tea brewed from some violent green shrub.’
    • ‘A popular social pastime is the drinking of maté, a tea made from the leaves of a plant related to holly.’
    • ‘He might be found lying in bed, drinking a cup of maté with seven sugars and reading a new poem to his friend.’
    • ‘One famous pastime is drinking maté, a Paraguayan tea made from holly leaves.’
    1. 1.1 The leaves of the maté shrub.
  • 2The South American shrub of the holly family which produces maté leaves.

    • ‘Drinks made of yerba maté are ubiquitous.’

Origin

Early 18th century: from Spanish mate, from Quechua mati.

Pronunciation

maté

/ˈmäˌtā/

Main definitions of mate in English

: maté1mate2mate3

mate2

noun

  • 1Each of a pair of birds or other animals.

    ‘a male bird sings to court a mate’
    • ‘In medieval times, there was a romantic belief that birds chose their mate in February.’
    • ‘To examine this question, we looked at the age of the mates of birds that did not emigrate.’
    • ‘The bird lives there for free along with his mates and fledglings.’
    • ‘At this stage males still accept additional mates and are actively courting.’
    • ‘Even animals have their mates, although some just procreate and leave.’
    • ‘Many are still waiting, but some morning soon they too will wake to the lilt of a backyard bird pleading for a mate.’
    • ‘Birds sing to establish territories and to attract mates.’
    • ‘A randy tortoise is on the run after scaling a two-foot wall in search of a new partner after his mate of 38 years died.’
    • ‘Both admitted intentionally killing a wild bird, injuring its mate and having a loaded air rifle without lawful authority.’
    • ‘Her mate appeared to counter-sing in response to the song of the female.’
    • ‘When an incubating bird is relieved by its returning mate, it leaves the nest immediately and flies away from the island.’
    • ‘Andean condor Homer and his mate Marge are love birds again - after vets gave him a blunter beak to save her from the sharp side of his temper.’
    • ‘Whenever possible, we selected birds whose mates were present at the nest to ensure that chicks were not left alone.’
    • ‘The male partner will provision his mate with food but does not go into the maternity den.’
    • ‘The birds attract mates by the color intensity of their feathers - a signal of their desirability.’
    • ‘He then told them that he would take all steps necessary so that the zoo gets new species of animals and mates for those animals that are single now.’
    • ‘It traps pheromones to alert potential mates of sexual receptivity.’
    • ‘The bird and its mate had built the nest in the bottom of the box and laid five tiny eggs.’
    • ‘This animal, which has lived without a mate for her entire life at the zoo, will always be remembered as one who never fell ill and as one who never threw a tantrum.’
    • ‘This was the time when the birds were believed to choose their mate for the spring.’
    1. 1.1informal A person's husband, wife, or other sexual partner.
      • ‘So, I asked my daughter, do the teachers talk of love - for mate and child - in terms of respect?’
      • ‘Girls should have the confidence to play hard to get, to wait until they find a mate who matches their demands rather than giving in so easily.’
      • ‘How did your potential mate treat his/her last girlfriend, boyfriend, husband or wife?’
      • ‘From this perspective, the problem of your missus or your mate takes on added significance.’
      • ‘Focus on muscle control as you stare into your mate's eyes and mirror his moves.’
      • ‘I mean, that's terrible to lose a life partner and a mate at any age, but certainly at a young age like that.’
      • ‘Her devoted mate of six decades is a retired production supervisor.’
      • ‘Image is everything in Hollywood, and one's mate is among one's most important accessories.’
      • ‘Her devoted mate of five decades was an insurance agent.’
      • ‘You are a passionate, compassionate, sexual lover, requiring the same qualities from your mate.’
      • ‘Paired with a loving mate, this sign makes a loyal and ever-interesting lover.’
      • ‘She said if we treated our husbands / mates like we treated our pet dogs, our marriages would be happier.’
      • ‘It is always terrifying to give birth; how much more so without one's mate there to share the moment?’
      partner, husband, wife, spouse, lover, live-in lover, amour, significant other, inamorato, inamorata, companion, helpmate, helpmeet, consort
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2informal One of a matched pair.
      ‘a sock without its mate’
      • ‘Have you ever wondered as to the whereabouts of the mate to those odd socks you find in the dryer or your sock drawer?’
      match, fellow, twin, companion, pair, one of a pair, other half, equivalent, counterpart
      View synonyms
  • 2in combination A fellow member or joint occupant of a specified thing.

    ‘his tablemates’
    partner, husband, wife, spouse, lover, live-in lover, amour, significant other, inamorato, inamorata, companion, helpmate, helpmeet, consort
    View synonyms
  • 3British informal A friend or companion.

    ‘my best mate Steve’
    ‘I was with a mate’
    • ‘So at the bus stop outside work at 3.30 pm, I ran into an old mate from school.’
    • ‘I'm also still in touch with a couple of mates from school.’
    • ‘More and more anglers are either going solo, or going in partnership with a mate or several mates and buying their own boat.’
    • ‘His mates woke him with seconds to spare, and he dressed somewhat hurriedly.’
    • ‘I feel like a dunce in this company, until I get talking to some of my mates in the group who share a lot of my frustrations and aspirations, and are a holy if unruly group.’
    • ‘He has few mates, preferring the company of his current partner, two children from different couplings, a hound and local goats.’
    • ‘A couple of years ago, I had a bunch of my mates and their respective partners back at my place after we'd all been out at some do or other.’
    • ‘He didn't tell his mates at school about all his medical problems and he didn't mention that against all the odds, he was a sporting champion.’
    • ‘He prepared for the head shave by growing his hair for three months - and putting up with teasing from his mates at school.’
    • ‘I do really really love going out, particularly with a mate or crowd of mates…’
    • ‘It's all about meeting up with old mates, making new friends and being part of a massive crowd with one thing in common.’
    • ‘I am now retired, time-rich and have a wealth of good friends and drinking mates.’
    • ‘On the way back we bought fresh mangoes and dragon fruit from a road side stall and my mates made friends with the owner and got double portions.’
    • ‘The fire glows, venison stew simmers, the hunter and his mates drink beer and yarn on into a New Zealand night.’
    • ‘A mate of mine from school is throwing a flat-warming party, which a number of people from school are going to be at.’
    • ‘Anyway, my doctor friend and his golfing mates are welcome to have a cutting.’
    • ‘The subdued lighting and stylish interior are perfect for a pre-club swally with mates or an intimate quaff with your latest flame.’
    • ‘Firemen came in looking for images of their mates who had gone into the blazing buildings.’
    • ‘We were pals, chums, mates and the bosomiest of bosom buddies.’
    • ‘It's shaping up to be a great party, all of us together at the barbeque, mates, mates of mates and partners of mates.’
    friend, companion, boon companion, comrade, intimate, familiar, confidant, alter ego, second self
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Used as a friendly form of address between men or boys.
      ‘“See you then, mate.”’
      • ‘I just had the perfect run, mate, it was like I was in the zone, you know, it was just all happening for me, and I just got the best run through.’
      • ‘I'm really sorry about this, mate, but it's for your own good, honest.’
      • ‘And if you think you can shoot off emails like that without getting an enraged response, you'd better think again, mate.’
      • ‘‘You shouldn't leave your door open, mate,’ he said as he realised I was right behind him.’
      • ‘Well maybe you should mediate because I wouldn't want to be left alone in a room with her, mate.’
      • ‘It may be just a smear to you, mate, but it's life and death to some poor wretch.’
      • ‘Go on the cabbage soup diet, mate, it worked for me.’
      • ‘None of that euphemistic glowing or perspiring here, mate.’
      • ‘The defendant then shouted at the injured driver, ‘There's no damage, mate, you're alright’.’
      • ‘Better get that down you then, mate, keep the cold at bay.’
      • ‘This one's for you, mate, and I promise never to call your wheels a ‘second division footballer's car’ again.’
      • ‘Not on your bloody life, mate, we know what's in it.’
      • ‘He wound down his window, leant over, and said, ‘What direction you headed in, mate?’’
      • ‘You will need to watch the thing more than once, mate.’
      • ‘You want a slap in the face, mate?’
      • ‘You reach your own conclusions, mate, I don't have to spell it out.’
      • ‘And if I have mistranslated, remember that it's all from my memory, mate.’
      • ‘‘These days it's sibling revelry, mate,’ Tim jokes in his soft New Zealand accent.’
      • ‘That trademark murmur of his implies ‘I've seen it all before, mate, and I tell it like is.’’
      • ‘Bear in mind that you can buy without a guilty conscience - it's for charity, mate!’
      man, my friend
      View synonyms
  • 4British An assistant to a skilled worker.

    ‘a plumber's mate’
    • ‘She's now an aviation electrician's mate and soon will start in the shop for electricians.’
    • ‘We had no lifting training and were not provided with driver's mates to assist with the lifting involved.’
    assistant, helper, apprentice, subordinate
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1 A deck officer on a merchant ship subordinate to the master.
      See also first mate
      • ‘Several of the crewmen had heard word of their new expedition, and could not help but to share it with their fellow mates.’
      • ‘The same applied to the sailing master, his mate, and the carpenter when they also arrived.’
      • ‘Some say they are old mates or boatswains watching to see that your job is done in a proper ship-shape way.’
      • ‘The ship's mates would be here at any minute, and I would lose my charter to Antwerp if I was caught.’
      • ‘It seems likely that there was a minimum crew comprising master, mate, boatswain, at least two seamen and possibly one apprentice.’
      • ‘Therefore the defendant's fault was not a cause of the collision which occurred while the mate was in charge of the ship.’
      • ‘This was only to be expected, and it was the mate and second mates' jobs to motivate them with threats and promises.’
      • ‘When a sailor ‘belonged’ to a ship his main loyalty was to his ship and his mates.’
      • ‘Perhaps the captain and his mate would like to make me an offer?’
      • ‘Two are professionally qualified skippers and mates; the others are volunteer crew.’
      • ‘To make matters worse, he put the tanker on autopilot and he left the helm in the hands of a fatigued third mate.’
      • ‘Johnny tried, failed, and eventually gave up on getting the captain and mate to reach peace.’

verb

  • 1no object (of animals or birds) come together for breeding; copulate.

    ‘successful males may mate with many females’
    • ‘Albatross are faithful birds and only mate once a year with one regular partner.’
    • ‘Queenless colonies generally rear male and female sexuals which typically mate in the nest.’
    • ‘She just stood there, staring off at some birds mating in a tree.’
    • ‘Crouching, with wings outstretched, the huge birds mate, then fly away together to a nearby glade.’
    • ‘Two of the captive birds successfully mated and produced the first captive-bred condor chick the following year.’
    • ‘Also it has been found that if a farmed fish mates with a wild fish the genetics of their spawn is modified.’
    • ‘In late winter they migrate to selected shallow bays, forming congregations to pair and eventually mate.’
    • ‘Researchers have found that the female monkeys and rats mate with multiple males to purposely confuse paternity.’
    • ‘White tigers are rare because they only occur when two tigers mate and both carry the gene for white coloring.’
    • ‘Members of the same species can mate and breed to produce fertile offspring.’
    • ‘In the fall, adults gather in the colonies to form pair bonds and mate.’
    • ‘The big test will come next spring when it is hoped that the birds will mate.’
    • ‘Two other fly species mated and formed a hybrid, a combined form that cannot mate with its fellow hybrids.’
    • ‘It was the hope of the zoo that the gorilla would mate with the female to help further the species.’
    • ‘Music was pumping through the stereo system - some latest hip-hop thing that sounded like two cats mating on a tin roof.’
    • ‘For simplicity, we assume that each individual only mates with one partner.’
    • ‘Many animals and birds mate for life and this seems to work quite well for them.’
    • ‘The pandas only have one mating season per year, and the San Diego pair did not mate.’
    • ‘Once a bull mates with a cow, he will look for greener pastures elsewhere and will not mate with the ‘old cow’ again.’
    • ‘How do foxes manage to mate with so many animals from other social groups?’
    copulation, copulating, coupling, sexual intercourse, intercourse, sex, procreation
    sexually active, breeding
    breed, couple
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Bring (animals or birds) together for breeding.
      • ‘The mice were mated systematically to generate the different allelic combinations.’
      • ‘Following exposure, exposed and control females were mated with intact males.’
      • ‘After this, each female was mated individually with two males from the stem population and kept with them for 3 days.’
      • ‘Animals mated this Autumn should be 100% sound.’
      • ‘In the second part of the study, we mated females to males of differing eye span and examined the effects on fecundity and fertility.’
      • ‘Breeders in England and the United States have been successfully mating the rare species.’
      • ‘Then the scientists mated mice deficient in the GIP receptor with mice that lack leptin, a hormone that signals satiety.’
      • ‘Owners pay about £60,000 a time to mate their mares with him.’
      • ‘Sex ratio of their progeny was not considered in sire selection, and the bulls were not mated to the same group of cows in consecutive years.’
      • ‘In a follow-up study, the researchers mated unexposed rats with offspring of treated moms.’
      • ‘Flies were mated for 4 days and eggs laid within the following 5 days were counted.’
      • ‘At different intervals, rabbits were mated with males of proven fertility.’
      • ‘So clean animals are separated from unclean animals, and it is forbidden to sow two kinds of seed in one field, to wear clothes of two kinds of fabric, or to mate two kinds of animals.’
      • ‘As well, there is a reluctance on the part of farmers to mate any bulls for fear they will lose their strength and condition.’
      • ‘After irradiation each male was individually mated with two non-exposed females over a period of 3-4 days and then removed.’
      • ‘To examine sperm transport in the female reproductive tract, males were mated with superovulated females.’
      • ‘After selection the chosen males and females were mated at random within line.’
      • ‘Treated mice were mated with untreated female T-stock mice.’
      • ‘He succeeded in mating a cow with the menagerie's bison, but the ensuing pregnancy came to a disastrous end.’
      • ‘Depending upon the year, 15-40% of males are socially mated with more than one female within a given breeding season.’
      couple, pair, join, bring together
      View synonyms
  • 2with object Connect or be connected mechanically.

    ‘a four-cylinder engine mated to a five-speed gearbox’
    • ‘While being basically hand-built, they were done on an assembly line, with the mechanicals being mated to the body shell around half way down the line.’
    • ‘The hydraulic drive (using a standard travel motor and brake from the excavator) is mated to a planetary gearbox.’
    • ‘The fuselage has been removed from the assembly jig and mated to the wing.’
    • ‘The reborn engine is then mated to a close ratio six-speed manual transmission and the new powertrain is reunited with the body.’
    • ‘The engine is mated to a five-speed manual gearbox while the rack and pinion steering features variable power assistance.’
    • ‘Backplanes permit drives to be snapped in and mated to a connector blindly.’
    • ‘On the test car, the engine was mated to a six-speed manual gearbox.’
    • ‘The two most powerful engines are mated to a six-speed gearbox.’
    • ‘The fastest engine in the range, the latter diesel plant is now mated to a 6-speed gearbox.’
    • ‘The 26-inch, fluted barrel is mated to an action made without magazine cutout for maximum stiffness and accuracy.’
    • ‘It is a 16 valve, four-cylinder 2.0-litre turbo charged engine mated to a six-speed gear box.’
    • ‘And the transmission is mated to a powertrain that wallows in a vast reservoir of torque.’
    • ‘The engine is mated to a tricky gearbox which gives you the option of being fully automatic, or a clutchless sequential manual.’
    • ‘A stiff nylon outsole is mated to a mesh and leather upper.’
    • ‘These are mated to 6 speed manual transmissions or 5 speed auto.’
    • ‘The engine is mated to a six-speed automatic transaxle - gradually emerging as the new industry standard for luxury cars.’
    • ‘The V6 is mated to a new five-speed transmission.’
    • ‘The two power sources are mated to a six-speed automatic transmission that is claimed to have the efficiencies of a manual.’
    • ‘One of the issues is to make sure that the right bodies are mated to the correct chassis.’
    • ‘The front end is contained within a tapered bushing that mates with a corresponding taper in the slide.’

Phrases

  • mates' rates

    • informal Discounted prices or preferential terms offered to friends by the seller of a product or service.

      ‘Rick arranged for the repair to be done at mates' rates’
      • ‘It provided billions in aid, free military hardware, latest intelligence support and some of the best mates' rates in international politics.’
      • ‘However by this time I had the trike finished and with the help of friends and the good old Australian 'mates' rates' it had cost me next to nothing in monetary terms, which pleased Lora to no end.’
      • ‘Joe, tell him George sent you and you'll easily get mates' rates.’
      • ‘I have to make a website for a friend (mates' rates unfortunately - free).’
      • ‘No transparency, no accountability, mates' rates - let's take our money and run.’
      • ‘Paul is offering him some gash about his friend being a printer and giving mates' rates.’
      • ‘I bought it off a friend at mate's rates.’
      • ‘If Chelle had been a physio like she wanted to when she was a teenager, I could be getting mates' rates.’
      • ‘If you're in that area, and want your carpets cleaned, give them a call and say Paddy said to give you a mates' rates price.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Middle Low German māt(e) ‘comrade’, of West Germanic origin; related to meat (the underlying concept being that of eating together).

Pronunciation

mate

/māt//meɪt/

Main definitions of mate in English

: maté1mate2mate3

mate3

verb & noun

Chess
  • short for checkmate
    • ‘Can you find the mate in two for White in today's diagram?’
    • ‘He carelessly walked into a mate in five, which he thought was simply drawing.’
    • ‘He wasn't paying attention since he saw that a forced mate resulted from the line he actually played.’
    • ‘For example, the chapter on endgame technique focuses on mating with bishop and knight and the rook and pawn versus rook endgame.’
    • ‘This book starts with mates in one and, around page one million, moves on to mate in twos.’

Origin

Middle English: the noun from Anglo-Norman French mat (from the phrase eschec mat ‘checkmate’); the verb from Anglo-Norman French mater ‘to checkmate’.

Pronunciation

mate

/māt//meɪt/