Main definitions of match in US English:

: match1match2

match1

noun

  • 1A contest in which people or teams compete against each other in a particular sport.

    ‘a boxing match’
    • ‘Such was their dominance over the visitors, had it been a boxing match, the referee would have stopped the contest in the first half.’
    • ‘I had sensed some nerves in the camp before the game, our first match in competition in two years.’
    • ‘He came back for four matches in the final games of the season and just squeezed in enough games to qualify for a title medal.’
    • ‘Each team will play five matches from tomorrow until Monday with the final scheduled for next Tuesday.’
    • ‘Because the kick-off of the game was delayed it was too dark to play extra time and the match is to be replayed.’
    • ‘I have seen teams win gruelling matches through good goal kicking.’
    • ‘Another worrying factor is the appointment of referees to officiate in matches involving teams from their own backyards.’
    • ‘The winners of their respective matches will contest the final, while the losers will play off for the bronze medal.’
    • ‘And, no matter what the sport, we all know that over a five match series the better team will win.’
    • ‘All games were keenly contested and several matches were decided on tiebreakers.’
    • ‘It is becoming increasingly frustrating to witness teams forfeiting matches for one reason or the other.’
    • ‘Few can have sympathy for a team who starts a match as if they are already one up.’
    • ‘There is no place in this distinctive genre for the football team, the cricket match or the game of bowls.’
    • ‘The World Cup final is a match that touches almost every country in some way.’
    • ‘He said the team was playing training matches with local clubs to help it tune up for the tournament.’
    • ‘The clubs have started a mutual war of nerves, accusing each other of fixing matches and corrupting referees.’
    • ‘We entertained ourselves with a talent show, boxing matches and tug-of-war duels.’
    • ‘There can't be many stadiums full to the rafters every week even though their team has lost six matches in a row.’
    • ‘We had worked so hard on team matches and winning really made us feel that the hard work paid off.’
    • ‘The players will be split into four teams for matches.’
    contest, competition, game, tournament, tie, cup tie, event, fixture, trial, test, test match, meet, bout, fight, duel
    View synonyms
  • 2A person or thing able to contend with another as an equal in quality or strength.

    ‘they were no match for the trained mercenaries’
    • ‘The giant tried to stop him at first, but his size and strength were no match for William's.’
    • ‘The poorly-armed soldiers prove to be no match for the battle mad Vikings.’
    • ‘She knew she was no match for his strength.’
    • ‘The satyr, drunken as he is, is no match for the heavyweight nymphs.’
    • ‘The cold was no match for these paragons of athletic prowess and goodwill.’
    • ‘Seeing she was no match for the animal in this grapple, the mother extended her hand into the bear's mouth.’
    • ‘I feared for a dog that would be no match for the thuggish birds.’
    • ‘Special care may have to be taken to ensure that he enjoys the company of his classmates, who are likely to be no match for him.’
    • ‘These vexed machines with their built in obsolescence are no match for me.’
    • ‘It is cheap and strangely enjoyable, but no match for a genuine blockbuster.’
    • ‘Our fast feet are no match for opponents on longboards, who tag us almost immediately.’
    • ‘However, the lack of experience was no match for the exuberance of youth.’
    • ‘The pen may be mightier than the sword - but it's no match for a boxer's fist.’
    • ‘In the end, truth is no match for economics and a misguided vision of self-preservation.’
    • ‘I resisted as best I could, but I was no match for the three of them, who dragged me to the water and threw me into the surf.’
    • ‘In recent decades his waning strength proved no match for the ravages of well intentioned but overbearing regulations.’
    • ‘She is no match for her husband either in stature or in qualities and accepts her lot with resignation.’
    • ‘Intelligence and honesty are sometimes no match for comfortable habits of thought.’
    • ‘Corporate greed and power are eventually no match for this woman's determination to set things right.’
    • ‘Despite some very good performances, they were no match for the strength of the local side.’
    equal, rival, equivalent, peer, counterpart
    View synonyms
  • 3A person or thing that resembles or corresponds to another.

    ‘the child's identical twin would be a perfect match for organ donation’
    • ‘The little girl has a rare tissue type with an estimated one in 90,000 chance of finding a perfect match.’
    • ‘The vaccine will almost certainly protect very well, but it's not the perfect match.’
    • ‘The match was far from perfect, and doctors were not optimistic about the chances of a successful transplant.’
    • ‘You spot the ideal pair of trousers on the hanger; they are the perfect match for your snazzy little jacket and top.’
    • ‘The bitter taste of the chocolate combined with sweet and refreshing fruit is a perfect match.’
    • ‘A kidney patient has been given a new lease of life after enduring a 20-year wait for a perfect organ match.’
    • ‘The two had been courting for quite some time and knew that their relative strengths were a good match.’
    • ‘At the lowest end there are some excellent everyday wines while at the top end quality matches price.’
    • ‘Dozens turned up for blood tests, but they will have to wait until next month to find out if any are a perfect match.’
    • ‘The sweet onions were a perfect match for the thyme and the other ingredients.’
    • ‘Medical opinion holds that if the patient's body doesn't reject the bone marrow within five years, it is a perfect match.’
    • ‘Their pungent, peppery taste is also the perfect match for mild-tasting ingredients such as avocados.’
    • ‘Instead, they could have their own tissue cloned to produce a perfect match.’
    • ‘He heard nothing for a decade until a letter asked him to save the life of a patient who was a perfect match and needed the transplant within days.’
    • ‘And one day that person waiting for an organ match could be themselves or someone very dear to them.’
    • ‘I've always added lemon rind to my butter - this gives it a really fresh zingy taste which is a perfect match for the mussels.’
    • ‘The cold gelato scoop on top was a perfect match as it melted onto its dark chocolately pedestal.’
    • ‘The orange warms up from the hot caramel sauce, and it's tanginess is a perfect match for the sweetness of the sauce.’
    • ‘It was a perfect match between the wish of people to own their own homes and a public which needed somewhere to put its savings.’
    • ‘Here, her activity is more personal and it is the perfect match for the way in which her husband chooses to depict her.’
    replica, copy, lookalike, double, twin, duplicate, equivalent, facsimile, like
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1Computing A string that fulfills the specified conditions of a computer search.
      • ‘When it finds a match, the database sends back the text message, identifying the song.’
      • ‘Have you ever done a search and seen that there were a million matches for your search terms?’
      • ‘Intelligence officers then search for a match on the internal database.’
      • ‘Aaron ran a search on the government database for any matches to her picture, but none came.’
      • ‘A search engine company's goal is to provide the end user with the best, most relevant matches to a search inquiry.’
    2. 3.2 A pair that corresponds or is very similar.
      ‘the headdresses and bouquet were a perfect match’
    3. 3.3 The fact or appearance of corresponding.
      ‘stones of a perfect match and color’
  • 4A person viewed in regard to their eligibility for marriage, especially as regards class or wealth.

    ‘he was an unsuitable match for any of their girls’
    • ‘Many matches and marriages came out of working in the factory.’
    • ‘Marriages usually result from family introductions, if not outright matches.’
    • ‘These rituals would often lead to matches and marriages, either immediately in the coming summer or autumn.’
    • ‘She had always encouraged the infatuation, saying that the pair were a perfect match.’
    prospective husband, prospective wife, prospect, candidate
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1 A marriage.
      ‘a dynastic match’
      • ‘He took her by storm and the match was the marriage of the year, that Hollywood would only experience in that time.’
      marriage, betrothal, relationship, partnership, union, pairing, alliance, compact, contract, affiliation, combination
      View synonyms

verb

[with object]
  • 1Correspond or cause to correspond in some essential respect; make or be harmonious.

    no object ‘the jacket and pants do not match’
    with object ‘we bought green and blue curtains to match the bedspread’
    ‘she matched her steps to his’
    • ‘As long as it matches your personal style and the rest of your outfit, you'll look great.’
    • ‘These statements, as it happens, match observed facts at the scene of the killing.’
    • ‘The speech pattern, which mimics the sound of his playing, has a distinctive modular tone that matches the rhythm.’
    • ‘At least, she can wear matching pyjamas to blend in with their colours.’
    • ‘In other words, match the tanner shade to your skin tone rather than the colour you would like to be.’
    • ‘One is that it could provide sick people with matching organs or tissues.’
    • ‘The honeyed brown of the truck matched her skin tone perfectly, and it was leathery soft.’
    • ‘They were not the usual fluff that is true for anyone but closely matched his personal life.’
    • ‘Nothing matches, and the colours are sharp enough to pierce your retina.’
    • ‘My eyes looked flat, dead, though I was crying, and my tone matched my eyes.’
    • ‘In short, the stock is creating its own filler, and the resulting color matches perfectly.’
    • ‘We'll read a few of them next week and see if what you wrote matches what, in fact, he said.’
    • ‘The failure of both sides of his face to act in unison shows that his real feelings don't match up with the image he is putting across to the public.’
    • ‘Choose a color or pattern that either matches or complements your suit.’
    • ‘And if you're going to go blonde try to make sure it matches your skin tone.’
    • ‘Now people have matching furniture, and kitchen gadgets, and pictures on the walls.’
    • ‘I'm very proud; the ambery colour I picked matches just right the base I already had.’
    • ‘The woman was brunette and had a plum evening gown on with matching make-up and a coordinating flower and feather in a bun on the base of her neck.’
    • ‘Foundation should match your skin tone as closely as possible; powder should match your foundation.’
    • ‘The synthetic skin didn't quite match his normal skin tone but that was the only indication that it was artificial.’
    corresponding, equivalent, parallel, analogous, coordinating, complementing, complementary, harmonizing, blending, toning, harmonious, the same, paired, twin, coupled, double, duplicate, identical, of a piece, all of a piece, like, like peas in a pod, like two peas in a pod, alike, comparable, similar, correlative, congruent, tallying, agreeing, concordant, consonant
    go with, coordinate with, complement, harmonize with, blend with, tone with, team with, be the same as, be similar to, suit
    be a pair, be a set, be the same, go together
    correspond, be in agreement, tally, agree, match up, coincide, accord, conform, square, harmonize, be consonant, be compatible
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Team (someone or something) with someone or something else appropriate or harmonious.
      ‘she was trying to match the draperies to the couch’
      ‘they matched suitably qualified applicants with institutions that had vacancies’
      • ‘How do you go about matching the appropriate celebrity with the clients?’
      • ‘Our role is to place them in the most appropriate position, matching the candidate's skills to those required by the client.’
      • ‘When pieces are stolen and smuggled out, sometimes blocks of fossils are matched together mistakenly.’
      • ‘Pin two sections together, matching the squares; stitch between the squares.’
      • ‘She had a gift for getting people to work together and she could always match the right person to the right job.’
      • ‘Each rider is matched with a horse of the appropriate weight and height, but they are all at ease with teaching people who have never ridden before.’
      • ‘Tape the two vinyl sections firmly together after they are matched so they won't move when you cut them.’
      • ‘There was no outright winner but 12 people matched three numbers.’
      • ‘Use wire nuts to fasten the two ends together, matching the color-coded wires.’
      • ‘The biggest problem was matching cars with people, most of whom wanted one-way rentals out of airports.’
      • ‘My answers were matched with those of people who were happy and successful in certain jobs.’
      • ‘We put together an unprecedented ground operation, but it was matched by the zealots on the right.’
      • ‘They simply seem like two oddly matched adults, thrown together.’
      • ‘Here, the game of matching his name to the appropriate subject can be astonishingly easy.’
      • ‘Are there people you want to read solo whom you'd like less if they were matched up with some appropriate co-bloggers?’
      combine, match up, link, bring together, put together, unite, marry, pair up, yoke, team, couple, pair, ally
      View synonyms
  • 2Be equal to (something) in quality or strength.

    ‘his anger matched her own’
    • ‘Sadly this tough talk is not matched by results.’
    • ‘The selfishness of fame seekers is only matched by the personal cost they have to pay for the fame they seek.’
    • ‘For six weeks, the results on the field matched the hype off it.’
    • ‘So, in many ways, the results didn't match the symbolism that he obviously enjoyed.’
    • ‘McCarthy's perceived influence among his peers is matched by his personal popularity.’
    • ‘His continually moronic, arrogant behaviour has meant that his results have never matched the drivel that comes out of his mouth.’
    • ‘It should be as light and as strong as possible, and its size should match your body and strength.’
    • ‘I tried a couple of shots to see if I could record what I saw today but the results didn't match my vision.’
    • ‘They found that the couples whose expectations matched their relationship skills were most satisfied.’
    • ‘Her beautiful looks and elegant acting were matched by rich tone, expressiveness, and virtuoso technique, which can be heard in her recordings.’
    • ‘Can't we pick people with a keener sense of how their strengths match the demands of the role?’
    • ‘The whiskey beat his expectations but didn't match his own collection.’
    • ‘The allure of the strapline was usually matched by the quality of the content.’
    • ‘He would have brushed me off, made me answer for my tone - but not argued with me, not matched me shout for shout.’
    • ‘The quality of the hot dog is matched by the quality of the toppings.’
    • ‘This sensitivity about representing race is not matched by an equal sensitivity about representing class.’
    • ‘Their skills increased as they trained and soon Raymond's people matched warriors of the other village.’
    • ‘Often they don't bother to announce rises at all, and when they do the result rarely matches the hike to the base rate the Bank of England has announced.’
    • ‘But then his intellectual brilliance is matched by his enigmatic personality - you can't be sure what he's really up to.’
    • ‘The power of the press to cause panic was matched by their equal power to quell the imbalance they had caused.’
    equal, be equal to, be the equal of, be a match for, measure up to, compare with, parallel, be in the same league as, be in the same category as, be on a par with, touch, keep pace with, keep up with, emulate, rival, vie with, compete with, contend with
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Succeed in reaching or equaling (a standard or quality)
      ‘he tried to match her nonchalance’
      • ‘New York City matched an 1893 degree record low for the day at one degree, according to the National Weather Service.’
      • ‘One survey suggests that if British enterprise levels matched those in the United States an extra 250,000 businesses would be created.’
      • ‘Thirty scores dotted the game, almost matching a modest foul count of 34.’
      • ‘There's a uniformly high standard set that is matched, then raised by every participant.’
      • ‘Some of the dioramas were repainted up to six times until they matched his exacting standards.’
      • ‘Two years ago more than 124,000 people attended this event, but they knew those figures couldn't be matched this time.’
      • ‘The next event was his best, the high jump, in which he matched his personal best, jumping clear of the field and moving into fourth.’
      • ‘Schools in the district have chalked up outstanding performances, with most of them at least matching the national average pass rate.’
      • ‘Schools in the area have once again performed well, with most at least matching the national average pass rate.’
      come up to, measure up to, meet with, be equal to, be as good as, satisfy, fulfil, answer to
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 Equalize (two coupled electrical impedances) so as to bring about the maximum transfer of power from one to the other.
      • ‘New features include a 1.8V matched impedance interface, known as stub series terminated logic.’
      • ‘If the load impedance perfectly matches the transmission line impedance, the reflected power is zero.’
      • ‘An impedance matching circuit is provided for each signal-carrying wire pair of the first and second wire pair sets.’
      • ‘Care should be taken in impedance matching between the elements of the user's GPS system.’
  • 3Place (a person or group) in contest or competition with another.

    ‘the big names were matched against nobodies’
    ‘evenly matched teams’
    • ‘An indication as to how evenly matched these two teams were is evidenced in the fact that both teams only registered one point each in the opening quarter.’
    • ‘Both teams came with the spirit of competition and were evenly matched with the skills displayed by all participants.’
    • ‘The two periods of extra time also failed to separate these two evenly matched teams but one wonders how.’
    • ‘He can be effective in the slot when he's matched against nickel cornerbacks who can't get their hands on him.’
    • ‘The two teams were evenly matched trading points early on.’
    • ‘We are evenly matched so we have to hope we want it more on the night.’
    • ‘No good or exciting game can be played without the participation of two good evenly matched teams.’
    • ‘This was a lively game of football with two evenly matched teams who played some good football in slippery conditions.’
    • ‘He was even matched against - and beat - the toughest cage fighters in the world in America.’
    • ‘It was a titanic struggle between two evenly matched teams.’
    • ‘I will stare down the pack of cigarettes, matching wits and strength against tobacco.’
    • ‘Two very evenly matched teams traded score for score in the third quarter.’
    • ‘In games like this where the stakes are so high, I think when the teams are evenly matched it can go either way.’
    • ‘The two teams are evenly matched in this series, and what will separate them is strategy.’
    • ‘The teams were evenly matched and shared the lead throughout the match.’
    • ‘Having drawn the first game it took extra time in this replay to separate what were two evenly matched teams.’
    • ‘The teams are evenly matched as they have split their games so far this year.’
    • ‘This was an exciting game between two evenly matched teams.’
    • ‘While on the field of play both teams were evenly matched.’
    • ‘From the very beginning, the teams were evenly matched.’
    draw against, set against, pit against, play off against
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • make a match

    • Form a partnership, especially by getting married.

      • ‘Both in the movies and in life, Tracy thought he and Hepburn were far too different to make a match; she thought they were much too alike.’
      • ‘Her plan is to send Tess to get the woman to take her in and make a match for her with a wealthy man so that the family will be set for life.’
      • ‘Matrimonials on the Net may have a long way to go before they start rivalling the conventional ways of making a match, but web companies are really striving hard to realise the latent potential of this medium.’
      • ‘A Boston matron he met during his trip north tried to persuade him to remain in that city in the hopes of making a match for a marriageable daughter.’
      • ‘However, the very next day she was besieged with complaints from her disappointed newlyweds, and conceded the great wisdom needed for making a match that leads to a happy marriage.’
      • ‘Surely this is now her only chance of making a match, for any respectable gentleman is bound to be dissuaded from asking for her hand.’
      • ‘Apparently they were planning to make a match for me.’
  • meet one's match

    • Encounter one's equal in strength or ability.

      ‘Iris had met her match’
      • ‘I imagine they have made some bawdy bravado remark about wanting to see someone's helmet, and have met their match.’
      • ‘I want to congratulate you on being a great interviewer, but I think you've met your match.’
      • ‘But Edinburgh's dreaded parking attendants have finally met their match in the shape of the doughty Balmoral Hotel.’
      • ‘However, on Wednesday they met their match even before stepping onto the cricket pitch.’
      • ‘And in the case of Saturday night's incident, the attacker nearly met his match.’
      • ‘It is where some of Australia's great outback legends were created, and where some met their match.’
      • ‘In some of the most humble people in the world, the would-be makers of the economic commandments may well have met their match.’
      • ‘It's also reassuring to have finally met my match in ineptness.’
      • ‘Professional eater that I am, I confess I met my match - even with the help of the women at the table taking their nibbling bites, I couldn't finish the dessert.’
      • ‘But at last our cold weather adventurer had met his match.’
  • to match

    • Corresponding in some essential respect with something previously mentioned or chosen.

      ‘a new coat and a hat to match’
      • ‘For millions of years it has led an unglamorous life with an unfortunate name to match.’
      • ‘Never any trouble to look after, he was a great little pet with a personality to match.’
      • ‘We have a Premier League set-up in terms of facilities and we have ambitions to match.’
      • ‘He has always been a charismatic lead singer and he certainly has the stamina to match.’
      • ‘So now we've just got the sideboard still to get, and possibly a new dining room table to match.’
      • ‘Having bundles of money and a lifestyle to match is little more than a dream to most folk.’
      • ‘The commercial offerings are very impressive, but tend to have a price tag to match.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • match up to

    • Be as good as or equal to.

      ‘she matches up to the challenges of the job’
      • ‘You have to go through so many filters, answer to the critics, match up to the last decent work.’
      • ‘Neil's job aspirations have not matched up to what was expected.’
      • ‘As far as pace is concerned, I don't think I have seen a single team that could match up to what we're doing.’
      • ‘No guy I've ever met has matched up to him and I doubt any guy ever will.’
      • ‘Sums given for flood relief have not matched up to even half of the needs of those left homeless, at risk, and without an income.’
      • ‘The statistics of most of the old-timers don't match up to what guys are doing today.’
      • ‘As the guidelines have recently changed we need to make sure that our operation matches up to what is expected.’
      • ‘But how could anything match up to what are quite frankly the most enjoyable gigs we've ever been to?’
      • ‘So it seemed that, for me, anyway, poems were going to happen rarely if they were going to match up to what I would wish them to be.’
      • ‘And one way to make us feel that we are lacking is by showing us images of people the majority of us do not match up to.’
  • match someone with

    • Bring about the marriage of someone to.

      ‘try if you can to match her with a duke’
      • ‘She wants to match Harriet with Mr. Elton, and when Harriet compliments him, Emma's plan is set in motion.’
      • ‘John tells Elinor that they are thinking of matching Miss Morton with Robert, now that Edward is marrying Lucy.’
      • ‘She arrives with strong opinions about politics and her social obligations that clash with her father's conservatism, and she has no patience with the upper-class twit her parents try to match her with.’
      • ‘After the death of her father-in-law and unsuccessful attempts at matching Mr. Tweedie with her daughters, Mrs. Lapham marries him herself, mainly to keep the silver shop in the family.’
      • ‘You should consider yourself lucky that you have been matched with a young noble at all.’

Origin

Old English gemæcca ‘mate, companion’, of West Germanic origin; related to the base of make.

Pronunciation

match

/maCH//mætʃ/

Main definitions of match in US English:

: match1match2

match2

noun

  • 1A short, thin piece of wood or cardboard used to light a fire, being tipped with a composition that ignites when rubbed against a rough surface.

    • ‘It was sort of cool that night so I went up into the house, struck a match and lit the heater.’
    • ‘Then he lit a match, and began igniting the shreds in the cup as he breathed in through the tube.’
    • ‘He struck a match and turned on the gas fire stove, placing a greased pan on the fire.’
    • ‘Take great care not to light fires, or even to discard matches or cigarette ends in areas where there is a danger of fire spreading.’
    • ‘I got up, and while doing so struck a match to ignite the overhead oxygen.’
    • ‘I struck a match and lit a candle and put it in the green glass dish and I went into the kitchen.’
    • ‘He struck a match and the objects on the mantelpiece threw brief shadows on the wall.’
    • ‘After several attempts and most of the matches, she lit a small fire.’
    • ‘After counting them, and returning the bag, he found a match and lit a small fire.’
    • ‘Nama struck a match and its head went into flames, then she took it and lit a small lantern in the middle of the room.’
    • ‘She struck a match on the rough side of the box, and quickly threw the burning stick onto the first bush.’
    • ‘He took part in training sessions and even played for short periods in some matches.’
    • ‘He lit a match and warmed the foil until the powder liquified.’
    • ‘Little kids like myself were handed matches and told to light the candles.’
    • ‘He tried to light up his matches to put his shoes on fire and explode.’
    • ‘It was he who struck a match and carried out the dramatic unmasking of the villain.’
    • ‘He poured some of the gas on the trash, struck a match, and soon the fire roared.’
    • ‘She positioned some sticks, and lit a fire with matches in her pocket, and sat down to warm up.’
    • ‘They have to catch and prepare their own food, light a fire without matches and build a shelter.’
    • ‘He threw petrol in my car as I was sitting in it and he struck a match and threw it at the car.’
    1. 1.1historical A piece of wick or cord designed to burn at a uniform rate, used for firing a cannon or lighting gunpowder.

Phrases

  • put a match to

    • Set fire to.

      • ‘It cannot be true for you that petrol burns and not true for me, since what happens when I put a match to petrol is just what happens if you do.’
      • ‘The summer had been hot and the scrub was tinder dry, so it took little effort to put a match to but needed careful watching.’
      • ‘Even if we had to put a match to what is left, and I sincerely hope we don't, we would still count it as a success.’
      • ‘It was the first thing he'd done when he got back from the hospital-sweep everything even vaguely illegal into a bag and then put a match to it.’
      • ‘A Canadian based in London with a background in classical piano and advanced mathematics, he has taken the rulebook and put a match to it.’
      • ‘Inside, he puts a match to the carefully laid wood of an open fire, the smoke billowing back immediately into the room.’
      • ‘He put a match to an ancient smoke flare, which he'd brought to signal our success to friends below, and held it aloft.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘wick of a candle’): from Old French meche, perhaps from Latin myxa ‘spout of a lamp’, later ‘lamp wick’.

Pronunciation

match

/maCH//mætʃ/