Definition of masquerade in English:

masquerade

noun

  • 1A false show or pretense.

    ‘his masquerade ended when he was arrested’
    • ‘I had to think of a way to end this masquerade, but a crowd had formed to watch and I didn't want to break up something that could be considered cool.’
    • ‘Everday life is almost solely composed of a series of ritualized masquerades.’
    • ‘If only this was just a Shakespearean farce and we could snigger at the gross stupidity of the characters portrayed and their ridiculous masquerades, but shamefully it is real and we are obliged to see it through to the end.’
    • ‘This belief makes each of the parties put up the masquerade up to the very end in the hope that once the prize is won, they would be able to jettison the other parties.’
    • ‘There are some journalists and war reporters who, despite years of experience, are very opinionated and whose masquerade of objectivity is easy to see through.’
    • ‘As masquerades start to unravel and tanks roll into town Charlotte is forced to decide whose safety matters most.’
    • ‘Dr Watson was seldom in danger of seeing through any of these masquerades.’
    • ‘Now, though, unable to be true to himself, his painting too became a masquerade.’
    • ‘But still, ever since I began this masquerade, I had tried to change everything.’
    • ‘Subsequently, the duke joins in on the masquerade, play-acting the threat of sexual violence - a rehearsal for his actions later in the film.’
    • ‘On the one hand, looking within from without causes her to adopt and discard various socially approved feminine masquerades whilst her ‘real’ self remains in hiding.’
    • ‘Some drawings are barely colored at all, others more fully, but one invariably feels that the artist is engaged in a masquerade of his own, pretending to be a child grown impatient with rules.’
    • ‘The mainly young protesters, many in their teens, defied the security forces' assaults and chanted slogans against the upcoming presidential elections, calling it a masquerade.’
    • ‘Later in the novel, Clara performs a masquerade in reverse, pretending to be a governess while she is still working as a servant.’
    • ‘Someone call the Washington Times and alert them to this sly wolfish masquerade!’
    • ‘It is unlikely we will soon return to a masquerade of can-can supported grandeur and today's parade music must bow to that reality-not the other way around.’
    pretence, deception, pose, act, front, facade, disguise, dissimulation, cover-up, bluff, subterfuge, play-acting, make-believe
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    1. 1.1 The wearing of disguise.
      ‘dressing up, role playing, and masquerade’
      • ‘Here is combined a long deep legacy of dress-up for masquerade, for carnival, for possession by the Gods combined with personal creativity and ingenuity.’
      • ‘Hasn't anyone besides me noticed the flavor of masquerade and carnivalesque fantasy in Joan's behavior?’
      • ‘Approximately fifty masquerade types appeared in the 1993 festival.’
      • ‘These drawings and models were juxtaposed with photographs of adult masquerade performances and examples of the masks themselves.’
      • ‘Some were dressed in costumes made from animal heads or fur - the origin of the contemporary Halloween masquerade.’
      • ‘Over her long and varied career, she has used masquerade, performance and role-playing to extend the frontiers of her own identity.’
      • ‘He upheld a New York State statute prohibiting the wearing of masks or facial disguises in public, other than for masquerade or similar entertainment purposes.’
      • ‘This reverse process can make these viewers unknowingly complicit with their own duping through artfully crafted masquerade.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, because we are accustomed to the roles each actor usually performs, we become acutely aware that we are witnessing a performance, or masquerade.’
      • ‘Pope Joan's description of the impromptu birth of her child, while the female pope was still in mannish masquerade, is a guaranteed conversation stopper.’
      • ‘Rather, it presented and discussed children's masquerade in Africa, a subject little explored but much witnessed by scholars studying African cultures.’
      • ‘Traditional African masquerade, dating back to the era before emancipation, used rags, paint, and spears to portray an image of a miserable, uncivilised past.’
      • ‘Or, how can one study a masquerade without discussing the physical mask, the apparent centerpiece of any masquerade?’
      • ‘The film explores this realm through a complex narrative use of masks and masquerade.’
      • ‘This distance functions like a mask or masquerade, revealing more than it hides.’
      • ‘Carnival Messiah has 100 performers from the worlds of theatre, opera, dance and masquerade, some international, others local.’
    2. 1.2North American A masked ball.
      • ‘The best part was to be the New Year's eve masquerade.’
      • ‘The cost is 1,000 yuan for dinner and masquerade, 500 yuan for masquerade only.’
      • ‘I can't believe that you managed to get him to escort you to this masquerade.’
      • ‘The masquerade starts after dinner from 9: 10 pm and will last into the early hours.’
      • ‘It is a site devoted to this musical masquerade.’
      masked ball, masque, fancy-dress party
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verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Pretend to be someone one is not.

    ‘a journalist masquerading as a man in distress’
    • ‘Lighthearted and serious at the same time, the story tells of a ruler who masquerades as a lowly sty-warden to observe what the community's various members do for the good of the whole.’
    • ‘There are many people that go around masquerading as boxing fans.’
    • ‘A woman masquerades as a doctor, but is stalking a male staff member as part of a delusion of erotomania.’
    • ‘A man working in the Post Office turns out to be a special agent with the skill to uncover aliens masquerading as humans.’
    • ‘Is this or isn't this a secret release from James masquerading under a different name?’
    • ‘The protagonists aren't rich characters masquerading as poor.’
    • ‘When he masquerades as someone else, he is just a fake.’
    • ‘And now many suspicious minds have concluded there is more than one person masquerading as the King.’
    • ‘After the usual anti-war stuff, he complains that ‘He is a Tory masquerading as a Labour politician’.’
    • ‘In the first, they chatted simultaneously with a woman and with a man masquerading as a woman, in an effort to spot the real woman.’
    • ‘Someone could come across border masquerading as a border patrol agent.’
    • ‘I was certainly startled by the two people I saw masquerading as my parents.’
    • ‘The rumours that this weblog is secretly written by a teenage prostitute masquerading as a 37 year old comedian are greatly exaggerated.’
    • ‘The ambitious teenager masquerades as pilot, doctor and lawyer while mainlining in embezzlement.’
    • ‘He masquerades as a bounty hunter and joins a small group of actors traveling to the King's palace to entertain the King, meeting the leader of the group, a charismatic young man with a taste for danger and beautiful women.’
    • ‘It's just a criminal gang masquerading as Loyalists.’
    pretend to be, pose as, pass oneself off as, impersonate, disguise oneself as, simulate, profess to be
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Be disguised or passed off as something else.
      ‘the idle gossip that masquerades as news in some local papers’
      • ‘Don't tell me this is masquerading under the guise of some kind of tribute.’
      • ‘It is just that, at this level, if you are serious about winning, you need to be ruthless when presented with anything vaguely masquerading as a chance.’
      • ‘At one point as I was wading through gravy, gristle and fat that was masquerading as lamb cutlets, I thought I found a prime piece of meat.’
      • ‘I submit that it is only a game masquerading as an athletic event.’
      • ‘And because it masquerades as news, we naturally let our guard down, invoking a built in trust of that which is media establishment.’
      • ‘We need to speak out against intolerance that masquerades as tolerance.’
      • ‘Badly acted, written and directed, it is nothing more than a dirty movie masquerading as a character study.’
      • ‘The lesson is dishonest in that it masquerades as science while including misrepresentations and factual errors.’
      • ‘It has become a business masquerading as a sport.’
      • ‘All such hopes have turned to ashes as we now contemplate this sad, trouble-plagued, expensive tram system masquerading as a public service.’
      • ‘In reality, this is a gorgeous dessert masquerading as health food.’
      • ‘But the slogan of freedom masquerading as moral clarity is quite another.’
      • ‘The outbreak of a mass emailing worm, which masquerades as a matchmaking program, has been brought under control.’
      • ‘This is a fully fledged computer masquerading as a gaming gadget, and - as you can tell from the price - it is aimed not at children, but overgrown kids.’
      • ‘I popped into the new coffee shop I spoke of a few days back and was served with a highly mediocre cup of sludgy end-of-day coffee masquerading as an Americano.’
      • ‘A modern reproduction that masquerades as brass it may be, but still it is beautiful.’
      • ‘She ended up working for a business that masquerades as a charity.’
      • ‘Is it a personality flaw masquerading as a political philosophy?’
      • ‘There I was, patiently reading through Chapter Thirty, when I reached something that was masquerading as the end.’
      • ‘One of e-mail's drawbacks is that it masquerades as communication when it is best used for informing, broadcasting, or scheduling.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French mascarade, from Italian mascherata, from maschera ‘mask’.

Pronunciation

masquerade

/ˌmaskəˈrād//ˌmæskəˈreɪd/