Definition of marshal in English:

marshal

noun

  • 1An officer of the highest rank in the armed forces of some countries, including France.

    • ‘Now, half of Napoleon's marshals had once been common soldiers.’
    • ‘Now, fully half of Napoleon's marshals had started their careers as common soldiers.’
    • ‘I am not sure to what degree either Napoleon or his marshals followed his advice.’
    • ‘In 1935 officers' ranks were re-established, including the rank of marshal for the top five commanders.’
    • ‘And the grand marshal, the base's 366th Fighter Wing commander, got out at the reviewing stand.’
    1. 1.1British historical A high-ranking officer of state.
      • ‘He was a marshal there from 1652 to 1661, and Deputy Magistrate from 1661 to 1664.’
  • 2US A federal or municipal law officer.

    • ‘Now he is coming back to town to settle things with the marshal who had apprehended him.’
    • ‘The placing of federal marshals on many planes and additional security measures should help boost travel further.’
    • ‘Federal marshals are guarding overseas flights, and state troopers are patrolling trains.’
    • ‘When somebody surreptitiously opened the canal - and local police refused to make arrests - federal marshals were called in.’
    • ‘In Illinois, federal marshals shot into a group of protesters, killing two.’
    • ‘Twenty-eight of the marshals were shot and another 160 police officers were injured.’
    • ‘Federal marshals were dispatched to hospitals with subpoenas.’
    • ‘Previously, marshals have said that federal dress codes had forced them to wear outfits that made them stand out from regular airline passengers.’
    • ‘Every pilot should be trained as a federal marshal.’
    • ‘They were surrounded by a force of federal marshals; two Native Americans were killed, and one marshal seriously wounded.’
    • ‘The next day federal marshals brought him back to Baltimore, where he pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.’
    • ‘In the past, marshals have used special ammunition designed for airplane safety.’
    • ‘Federal marshals estimated that the birdmen, in violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, killed thousands of birds over a five-year span.’
    • ‘Meredith had to be escorted through campus by federal marshals.’
    • ‘Now these marshals, of course, will wear plainclothes.’
    • ‘On the day, police officers, marshals and garage attendants will hand out flyers identifying alternative routes to motorists.’
    • ‘As US federal marshals dragged him away, his teenage daughters screamed, ‘Leave my daddy alone.’’
    • ‘However, when the justices travel around the country, they are sometimes protected by federal marshals rather than Supreme Court cops.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, federal flight marshals are still rare.’
    • ‘There must have been federal marshals somewhere, but I didn't notice them.’
    1. 2.1 The head of a police department.
      • ‘They were refused entry to the tavern and immediately went to the Canton Station in search of the Police Marshal.’
    2. 2.2North American The head of a fire department.
      • ‘The fire marshal's office and county police responded and examined the package, then called the Virginia State Police.’
      • ‘The authority for fire regulations for each state is governed either by the fire marshal or the state department of health.’
      • ‘The government already has three assistant fire marshals who inspect new buildings in the territory, and they may soon be joined by a fourth.’
      • ‘Working on an emergency action plan with a fire department or fire marshal helps to build rapport in the event of an emergency.’
      • ‘‘Luckily our fire marshals reacted in time and prevented the total loss of an expensive participating vehicle,’ he said.’
      • ‘Officials from the fire marshal's office were gathering information at the site for most of the week, but would not release the cause of the fire.’
      • ‘As building inspectors, fire marshals and riot police rally against them, the squatters continue to fight for decent shelter and survival.’
      • ‘A local fire department or state fire marshal's office can provide guidance on the minimum legal requirements.’
      • ‘All, however, reserve special praise for the South Shore fire marshal, whom they say has been an enormous help in planning the space.’
      • ‘You can call a fire marshal to inspect the house.’
  • 3An official responsible for supervising public events, especially sports events or parades.

    • ‘Organisation is brilliant and throughout the race there are ample marshals and water stations.’
    • ‘An official marshal in an orange vest was in place to initiate the spontaneous applause every time a wheelchair athlete sailed past.’
    • ‘There was absolute lack of coordination and communication between the start, the paddocks and corner marshals.’
    • ‘More than 400 people will be supporting the event, many being reunited after working as marshals during the Commonwealth Games.’
    • ‘They went ahead and terminated, not only my membership of the Council, but also my status as a skate official, a marshal and even my ordinary membership.’
    • ‘They appoint their own marshals, who control the annual get-together.’
    • ‘Parking at the event appeared well organised and there were plenty of marshals about to make sure cars were lined up properly and able to leave the ground easily at the end of the day.’
    • ‘As for furthering the association's development, the new president plans further training of athletes and marshals.’
    • ‘The organisers need marshals and bucket collectors to help them on the day.’
    • ‘Surveys show that drivers and the public all want marshals and someone has to pay.’
    • ‘Around one hundred marshals will be out on the fells to ensure the safety of runners and Yorkshire Television will be filming a documentary of the day.’
    • ‘A code was introduced for large challenge events requiring organisers to provide marshals and toilets but this is unenforceable.’
    • ‘The sheer scale of the event is reflected in the fact that no fewer than 5,000 people were involved behind the scenes between officials, marshals and team members.’
    • ‘The motor cycle crew do fantastic work on the road to make it safe for all participants, while the stewards and cycle marshals make sure all traffic is kept moving and there are no delays.’
    • ‘Garda and road marshals will be in place along the route of the parade.’
    • ‘Safety was a priority thanks to the well organised marshals, stewards and the members of the Civil Defence who were standing by to deal with any emergency that might arise.’
    • ‘While cyclists get a good night sleep tonight, organisers will be at the venue, setting up watering points, organising marshals and coordinating safety vehicles.’
    • ‘Fireworks went off, barricades were removed and crowd marshals went home as the thousands and thousands of people swarmed onto the bridge.’
    • ‘In order to get good action shots we often have go in front of the catch fencing from the guidance of the race marshals and if a car does go out of control it usually shunts in the tyre wall and comes to rest.’
    • ‘Last year she helped to organise a national marshal training campaign, designed to make rallying safer, for the drivers and spectators.’
    official, marshal, organizer
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Arrange or assemble (a group of people, especially soldiers) in order.

    ‘the general marshaled his troops’
    • ‘"You have got to have someone in there to marshal the troops.’
    • ‘Behind his affable, bluff demeanour and disingenuous screen image, one senses he is the master of all he surveys, not quite the lone reporter, rather a general marshalling an army of researchers.’
    • ‘However, their chances were few and far between in the first half thanks to a well marshalled defence with James and Sean playing very well.’
    • ‘They were marshalled into three groups - apparent ring leaders and troublemakers isolated into one group.’
    • ‘Crisp, sharp hurling, was complemented by an unyielding spirit and determination, with the players confidently marshalling their sectors with great gusto.’
    • ‘The younger players were well marshalled by their opponents and did not get the same latitude as they did in previous games.’
    • ‘However they could not breach a well organised defence well marshalled by Thomas and Jason and Kill retained their lead up to the break.’
    • ‘He'd be marshalling his troops to do the impossible; taking the fight to the enemy, probing for weakness in ifs defenses, and breaking through.’
    • ‘The hordes of away fans were marshalled safely in and out of the ground by police.’
    • ‘He scored 41 runs, took a diving catch and put in a tight bowling spell - and generally marshalled his troops effectively throughout.’
    • ‘In the end, a true leader is the one who often makes the right decisions, be it selecting the right people for the match, winning the toss and most importantly, marshalling his resources on the field.’
    • ‘The Dutchman, making his debut for the Perth club, did his best to marshal a back line denuded of two players thanks to the folly of red cards in a pre - season friendly.’
    • ‘She marshalled her players before the game against Pannyok, speaking sternly, grasping each by the shoulder.’
    • ‘To realise his dream, he is marshalling seven of New Zealand's best dancers to workshop the new dance - four of whom are working internationally.’
    • ‘It marshalled organised labour against a war involving British participation for the first time since Suez, ultimately winning the united support of the TUC general council.’
    • ‘He was replaced by Gareth, who had an excellent game, marshalling his back-line well and hitting two thirds of his place kicks in windy conditions.’
    • ‘The absence of Graham is a massive blow and without him nobody seemed capable of marshalling the full-back line.’
    • ‘Napoleon marshalled his forces rapidly, and this speed of assembly proved the key to victory in 1805-7.’
    • ‘Donie tormented the opposition but generally was well marshalled by James who restricted him to just that single injury time point.’
    • ‘He recruited and marshalled the troops and issued their orders.’
    gather, gather together, assemble, collect, muster, mass, amass, call together, draw up, line up, align, array, organize, group, put in order, set in order, put into position, set into position, arrange, deploy, position, order
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Methodically assemble and arrange (facts, ideas, objects, etc.)
      ‘she is one of those people who can marshal their thoughts quickly and articulate them clearly’
      • ‘And marshal your facts and arrange your thoughts, so you can present a logical argument to the readers.’
      • ‘Darwin spent over 20 years collecting and marshalling evidence before publishing the Origin of Species in 1859.’
      • ‘It might have been useful for her to develop more fully an organizational framework capable of marshaling her textual and material evidence as well.’
      • ‘I marshal evidence for the concepts or hypotheses that formulate my insight before I judge that something is true or not.’
      • ‘In the Internet era, when facts are literally at one's fingertips, marshaling information is no longer enough to constitute learning.’
      • ‘There is no need to marshal facts for an argument.’
      • ‘Still, how one marshals the evidence, how one organizes and presents it, and how one treats contrary evidence are always major components of a good answer.’
      • ‘He marshals facts and arguments in numbered order.’
      • ‘Yet it was only by selection, editing and rearrangement that the facts of nature were marshalled.’
      • ‘The defense lawyers can't possibly have marshaled all of the mitigating factors in order to make a presentation already.’
      • ‘The evidence, carefully marshalled, blows the official case to shreds.’
      • ‘Substantial financial resources must be marshalled and drawn down during planning and construction, and the ensuing debt serviced over long pay-back periods.’
      • ‘The most important part of his job, though, is marshaling data to help the administration improve care.’
      • ‘Our heroine used the rest of the afternoon to marshal her thoughts and resources.’
      • ‘We have adopted the idea that the best way to explore an idea is a debate that requires opponents to marshal arguments for one side and ignore, deny or ridicule points that support the other side.’
      • ‘Evidence is not given sequentially - it comes out witness by witness and needs to be marshalled and arranged issue by issue.’
      • ‘No wonder they cannot write, or organize their thoughts, or marshal an argument, or identify the decade in which the Civil War took place.’
      • ‘These facts are marshalled to produce the opposite of the truth.’
      • ‘It needs wide knowledge and ability to marshal facts.’
      • ‘The facts are well marshaled but the text suffers from lax editing and proofreading.’
      usher, guide, escort, conduct, lead, shepherd, steer, take
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Correctly position or arrange (rolling stock)
      • ‘Soon this type of locomotive proved too light for the heavy trains that were being marshalled and were eventually assigned to lighter work, shunting scrap and ingot buggies.’
      • ‘However, open and closed wagons are available for the carriage of bicycles and can be marshalled into a train as required.’
      • ‘The time frame to switch out these many local jobs and marshal the outbound train was tight and required precision work in a small yard.’
      • ‘The site also has a secure hard stacking and truck marshalling area.’
      • ‘Heavy cars must be marshalled as close as possible to the head-end and light cars to the rear of trains.’
    3. 1.3 Direct the movement of (an aircraft) on the ground at an airport.
      • ‘After being marshalled in, Matt cut the engine.’
      • ‘But he likes the feeling of pride he gets when marshaling a bomber plane to the runway for a launch - no matter the weather.’
      • ‘He saw that the taxiing aircraft was coming way too close to the parked one and that the person marshalling was still directing the aircraft forward.’
      • ‘A reflective vest provides increased visibility needed during aircraft marshalling that allows safe flightline operations.’
      • ‘As they marshaled the aircraft to its final parking spot, the number three brake became engulfed in flames.’
  • 2Heraldry
    Combine (coats of arms) to indicate marriage, descent, or the bearing of office.

    • ‘Thus, when more than one different coat of arm is marshaled on a shield, through descent from heraldic heiresses, it was placed 'quarterly'.’
    • ‘However, they were often infringed when two or more different arms were combined (or marshaled) within one shield and two tinctures that should in principle not touch each other necessarily became adjacent.’
    • ‘The insignia of an order or decoration should not be displayed with a shield on which the arms of two spouses are marshaled, because the honor is specific to the person to whom it was granted, not to his or her spouse.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting a high-ranking officer of state): from Old French mareschal ‘farrier, commander’, from late Latin mariscalcus, from Germanic elements meaning ‘horse’ (compare with mare) and ‘servant’.

Pronunciation

marshal

/ˈmɑrʃəl//ˈmärSHəl/