Definition of maritime in English:

maritime

adjective

  • 1Connected with the sea, especially in relation to seafaring commercial or military activity.

    ‘a maritime museum’
    ‘maritime law’
    • ‘The first blocks to be explored are just a few miles away from Britain's proven Foinaven and Shiehallion fields, across a maritime border agreed by treaty two years ago.’
    • ‘The maritime borders between Australia and East Timor have never been defined.’
    • ‘Between 1936 and 1969 maritime air operations in Britain were under the control of Coastal Command units.’
    • ‘Based on maritime law hundreds of year old, salvage was established to encourage ship owners to abandon their schedules and help those in trouble.’
    • ‘But naval and maritime chiefs want more than a ‘one-year wonder’ to re-invigorate interest in the sea.’
    • ‘He defines sea power broadly to include maritime trade and ocean resources, and he analyzes the importance of sea lines of communication.’
    • ‘Research into naval and maritime issues has just got easier with the opening of the Naval Reference Collection at Campbell Park.’
    • ‘He received his award for service to the preservation and documentation of Australia's naval history and maritime heritage.’
    • ‘The area has also been key to Britain's maritime trade with both ship-building and freight playing a major role in the regions development.’
    • ‘The Treaty brought about a compromise in the dispute over maritime borders between the two countries and allowed the development of oil and gas resources to progress.’
    • ‘The change which has taken place in relation to matters maritime is also of similar magnitude.’
    • ‘Their spring 2005 Conservation Bulletin was devoted to maritime and coastal heritage.’
    • ‘Active Endeavour is the name given to the policing of maritime trade routes as part of the global war against terrorism.’
    • ‘It needs to understand that nearly the entire income of the federal government in the early decades of the republic derived from tariffs on maritime trade.’
    • ‘The navies of the two Koreas engaged in a firefight along their disputed maritime border in June 2002.’
    • ‘The UK is reliant on maritime trade and if it gets disrupted then it's going to have an impact on us.’
    • ‘The archaic vessel that was found near Cherthala could have thrown light on the State's maritime history.’
    • ‘Superiority in coastal areas or maritime blockade should be seen as prerequisites of success in an operation.’
    • ‘And the sea will also be off-limits, with French warships guarding a maritime exclusion zone around Omaha Beach near Arromanches.’
    • ‘The hour-long ceremony alongside Southsea Naval War Memorial is intended to honour 9,000 maritime veterans of all nations.’
    naval, marine, nautical, seafaring, seagoing, sea, ocean-going
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    1. 1.1 Living or found in or near the sea.
      ‘dolphins and other maritime mammals’
      • ‘This species lives exclusively in or near sandy soils within coastal dune and scrub communities and maritime chaparral.’
      coastal, seaside, littoral
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Bordering on the sea.
      ‘two species of Diptera occur in the maritime Antarctic’
      • ‘The coastal maritime region is filled with mangrove swamps and alluvial plains that support palm trees.’
      • ‘An acceptable balance of interests between maritime states and coastal states appears to have been achieved.’
    3. 1.3 Denoting a climate that is moist and temperate owing to the influence of the sea.
      • ‘In the colder reaches of the Arctic and in Talkeetna, which enjoys a cooler maritime climate, there was very little change.’
      • ‘Despite a fine maritime climate, more than 30 percent of the inhabitants have overt symptoms of asthma.’
      • ‘By changing hemispheres every six months they made the most of the darkness while the maritime climates of the two cities made the temperatures bearable.’
      • ‘The climate is maritime along the coast and continental in other areas.’
      • ‘These treatments were chosen as typical of spring temperatures in a temperate, maritime climate, such as that prevailing in Aberystwyth, UK.’
      • ‘Initial research, he says, suggests the crops are ideally suited to Pembrokeshire's maritime climate.’
      • ‘The walls are punctuated with small grilled openings - very unsuitable in a hot tropical maritime climate, I might add.’
      • ‘The climate, both tropical and maritime in nature, usually has high humidity and high temperatures.’
      • ‘It was unusually cold for autumn, something quite unusual for the largely maritime tropical climate of the island, a bad omen.’
      • ‘In the west, the fiordlands and alpine terrain of British Columbia attest to vigorous glaciation of high-relief mountains in a snowy, maritime climate.’
      • ‘The temperate maritime climate, with warm summers and cool, wet winters, becomes more extreme towards the south and east.’
      • ‘The maritime climate ensures that there are very few winter frosts, allowing the cultivation of many tender and unusual plants.’
      • ‘Seattle's mild maritime climate means you can drink lattes with the locals at an outdoor cafe well into the holiday season.’
      • ‘At Lily Fen, the maritime climate results in a high water table and consequent differentiation of microhabitats.’
      • ‘The climate is temperate maritime, modified by the North Atlantic Current.’
      • ‘Research has shown that ryegrasses grow throughout the year in a temperate maritime climate.’
      • ‘It really doesn't get down to Scandinavian lows here, but the humidity caused by our maritime climate makes a zero degrees day feel utterly bitter.’
      • ‘The area's mild, rainy, maritime climate is in sharp contrast to the dry, sunny lands of southern Spain.’
      • ‘The South Island has a maritime climate and snow can fall at ground level in Fjordland in winter.’
      • ‘With regard to the environmental condition, many of the examined samples contain a preponderance of ferns and lycopod types, indicative of a maritime climate.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin maritimus, from mare ‘sea’.

Pronunciation

maritime

/ˈmerəˌtīm//ˈmɛrəˌtaɪm/