Main definitions of mare in US English:

: mare1mare2mare3Mare4

mare1

noun

  • The female of a horse or other equine animal.

    • ‘With two stallions and 20 brood mares, the Ford's are expecting 16 foals this season.’
    • ‘If the mares are not in foal to Kentucky stallions, it is difficult to get a really top price.’
    • ‘Eating infected fescue often causes extended pregnancies in mares, resulting in foaling problems.’
    • ‘The stallion, however should be kept in such a way to prevent him from seeing any of the mares or other horses except other stallions.’
    • ‘Inbreeding may account for the fact that far fewer than half of all breeding mares foal each year.’
    • ‘She saddled the mare, the just-awoken horse quickly catching onto Fiona's urgency.’
    • ‘The infection can be derived from contaminated bedding and it can be spread from stallions to mares during breeding.’
    • ‘Males mature more slowly; at three, they begin to pester mares in estrus and are driven out of their natal group.’
    • ‘The three riders fought to contain their horses but the mare wasn't as much trouble as the two stallions were.’
    • ‘Then one day, he noticed that a mare, a stallion and a foal had crossed the fence into the park.’
    • ‘A breeding herd usually consists of a stallion with anything from one to five mares, and their foals.’
    • ‘They bought a lot of very high-priced stallions and brood mares and so on from all around the world.’
    • ‘Tragically, as that happens, thousands of mares, foals and stallions will die.’
    • ‘They live in permanent small family groups made up of a stallion and one to several mares and their foals.’
    • ‘Most adults live in social groups, either of stallions, of mares with their dependent foals, or in mixed sex groups.’
    • ‘Other than predator defense by the male, the mare mostly raises the foal.’
    • ‘This is especially useful for skittish horses and pregnant mares.’
    • ‘The structure that was destroyed was a barn used for foaling mares and prepping yearlings.’
    • ‘She didn't want to go home to her stables and see all the beautiful mares and gelding and stallions and not see her mare.’
    • ‘It really doesn't matter whether you have a stallion or a mare or a gelding.’

Origin

Old English mearh ‘horse’, mere ‘mare’, from a Germanic base with cognates in Celtic languages meaning ‘stallion’.

Pronunciation

mare

/mɛr//mer/

Main definitions of mare in US English:

: mare1mare2mare3Mare4

mare2

noun

British
informal
  • 1A very unpleasant or frustrating experience.

    ‘this week is going to be a bit of a mare but at least the end is in sight’
    • ‘Two weeks ago I had a complete mare getting out of a multi-storey car park in Watford.’
    • ‘Planning a party is a total mare when you're a Hollywood It Girl.’
    • ‘Eventually got to bed in the small hours and woke up this morning with a mare of a hangover.’
    • ‘Another hot day - work's always a mare because the air conditioning's clapped out and that part of town stinks.’
    • ‘Last night was a bit of a mare though.’
    • ‘I'm having a bit of a mare booking some train tickets.’
    • ‘Listen, mate, I'm, like, totally having a complete mare.’
    • ‘I've been responsible for their online activity, and the whole thing has been a bit of a mare in terms of tweaks and last minute changes and late night shenanigans.’
    • ‘Also trying to sort out online radio licences which is a bit of a mare but keeping me on my toes.’
    • ‘Coming back from Middlesbrough last night was an utter mare.’
    ordeal, horror, torment, trial
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (especially in sports) a very poor performance.
      ‘Eboue had an absolute mare down the right hand side’
      • ‘Darren Davies had the proverbial mare and finished last.’
      • ‘Omar Bravo is having a bit of a mare today.’
      • ‘The young striker - once much-tipped in these parts - had an absolute mare before ending the game being stretchered off.’
      • ‘It was an honest acknowledgement that he has struggled to look at home in international football, including yesterday's performance when, by his own admission, he had 'a bit of a mare'.’
      • ‘Having had a bit of a mare against Forest last week Leigertwood was lucky to be given the nod ahead of Derry in midfield.’

Origin

1990s: abbreviation of nightmare.

Pronunciation

mare

/mɛr//mer/

Main definitions of mare in US English:

: mare1mare2mare3Mare4

mare3

noun

Astronomy
  • A large, level basalt plain on the surface of the moon, appearing dark by contrast with highland areas.

    in names ‘Mare Imbrium’
    • ‘This means, Zuber says, that the northern lowlands are flatter than the lava floods of the lunar maria, flatter than the vast volcanic plains of Venus, flatter than deserts on Earth.’
    • ‘About 3.9 billion years ago, one of these formed the great Imbrium Basin, or Mare Imbrium, and its mountain ramparts.’
    • ‘Most of the Moon's iron-rich basalt maria occur on the near side as well, where they alternate with highlands having only moderate concentrations of iron.’
    • ‘No one was surprised by that - the idea of lunar maria had been replaced by lava plains decades earlier.’
    • ‘Sometimes the moon looks like a coin, its endless maria spreading their eagle wings across the landscape.’
    • ‘He asserted that the highlands and maria are made up of different kinds of rock, and the Apollo samples seemed to confirm that.’
    • ‘All the Moon's multi-ringed impact basins are older than the Moon's second kind of crust, consisting of basalts that have flooded low-lying areas to form the lunar maria.’
    • ‘Mercury also recorded a similar bombardment history as the Moon in the sense that the Moon had a period of very heavy bombardment at the end of which the maria formed - the basins - which then later filled up with lava.’
    • ‘We had some idea there were compositional variations, because we could see differences in brightness between the smooth maria and the highlands.’
    • ‘Both elements are far more common in the maria - the lunar ‘seas’ that represent the outflow of the magma onto the satellite's surface - than they are in the rocky, mountainous regions known as terrae.’
    • ‘The largest of the lunar mare, Mare Imbrium sits in the Imbrium basin.’
    • ‘It must have happened before the visible maria formed, because they are not covered or scoured by the materials ejected from the huge craters.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: special use of Latin mare ‘sea’; these areas were once thought to be seas.

Pronunciation

mare

/ˈmɑreɪ//ˈmärā/

Main definitions of mare in US English:

: mare1mare2mare3Mare4

Mare4

proper noun