Definition of manuscript paper in English:

manuscript paper

noun

  • Paper printed with staves for writing music on.

    • ‘While most girls carry little hand mirrors or hair brushes, Mary always had manuscript paper and a pencil handy in case a sudden inspiration hit that required her to put it onto paper before it left her mind.’
    • ‘To face a blank piece of manuscript paper is difficult for anybody at any time.’
    • ‘To backtrack to actually reconstructing the piece, I usually start on good old-fashioned manuscript paper with a pencil.’
    • ‘Other pieces by Cage were composed by placing notes on physical imperfections in the manuscript paper, by tracing musical patterns from star maps, and so on.’
    • ‘The opening allegro was written in a white heat of inspiration, during a holiday in the mountains near Graz; he seems to have run out of manuscript paper, for the last 50 bars are scribbled out on dinner napkins.’
    • ‘And there are several sheets of blank manuscript paper, front and back, for your own notes and silences.’
    • ‘Such basic irritations do not even occur to us when skating across smooth manuscript paper with a ballpoint pen.’
    • ‘And we all know that musical scores don't just appear on manuscript paper overnight.’
    • ‘The sensitivity usually rises from musicians desperate to receive some encouragement for the notes they commit to manuscript paper.’
    • ‘She pulled out a pencil and some sheets of blank manuscript paper.’
    • ‘I always have some folded-up manuscript paper in it as well.’
    • ‘The avid mushroom-pickers who encounter a strange figure prostrate on the ground, holding a pencil and manuscript paper in his hands, are startled.’
    • ‘They even had the basic melody written out on a few sheets of manuscript paper.’
    • ‘Messiaen was not one to waste manuscript paper, so it is possible that he wrote this fragment down in 1965 on a sheet partly used two years earlier.’

Pronunciation:

manuscript paper

/ˈmænjəˌskrɪpt ˈpeɪpər/