Definition of manifold in US English:

manifold

adjective

formal, literary
  • 1Many and various.

    ‘the implications of this decision were manifold’
    • ‘We do not need to repeat the manifold examples of non-payment of water bills to town councils, with things then going from bad to worse.’
    • ‘Capitalism may work manifold miracles, but they don't include meeting essential social needs such as housing and health care.’
    • ‘The report will provide the most detailed and authoritative account so far of the manifold threats to Scotland's wildlife.’
    • ‘The manifold deficiencies were expected and easily borne.’
    • ‘Marber may or may not be a poker player, but he understands that the competitiveness and stoicism of the card table opens up manifold opportunities for exploring the male psyche.’
    • ‘Work in your communities, offering your manifold skills to groups that need them.’
    • ‘The investigation, which was mothballed after only 12 weeks, was also severely criticised for manifold failures and fatal delays.’
    • ‘For all his manifold flaws and for all the persistent rumours about his drinking, his approach mirrors the fundamental problem at the heart of his party.’
    • ‘Sound is used inventively, in manifold relationships to image, to suggest an active interplay between the conscious and unconscious.’
    • ‘If anything, this should motivate those of us who can see the manifold difficulties with the current multicultural ideology to critique it with even greater vigour and clear thought and to refuse to be silenced.’
    • ‘All that acknowledging and bewailing of the manifold sins of wickedness made this extended act of contrition a bit of a downer.’
    • ‘I caught the newsreader saying, ‘We acknowledge and bewail our manifold sins and wickedness’.’
    • ‘And it has done almost nothing to demonstrate the manifold benefits to Britain from immigration, even in its current, not especially well organised form.’
    • ‘To the great benefit of Kozloff's criticism, he does not eliminate the manifold ways of discussing photographs nor overly narrow his concerns.’
    • ‘Nor are the unions, with their manifold grievances, going to be placated by a couple of sentences.’
    • ‘After her husband's premature death from a suspected brain haemorrhage Maria became one of her son's main props, helping him to cope with the manifold pressures of a revolutionary's life.’
    • ‘Such breakthroughs could lead to manifold benefits.’
    • ‘The sonnet is probably the most durable of poetic forms, flexible yet sufficiently ordered to provide both infinite variety and a high level of unity in its manifold expressions.’
    • ‘Faber unveils the manifold hypocrisies at every layer of that society in the context of a story that builds to a thunderous climax while leaving ajar the door to a possible sequel.’
    • ‘These reasons alone are sufficient for us to continue extending helping hands to Africa, no matter how long it may take to solve the continent's manifold problems.’
    many, numerous, multiple, multifarious, multitudinous, multiplex, legion, diverse, various, several, varied, different, miscellaneous, assorted, sundry, copious, abundant
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Having many different forms or elements.
      ‘the appeal of the crusade was manifold’
      • ‘In such a manner we acquire manifold, thorough, and even useful knowledge about how philosophy has been presented in the course of history.’
      • ‘This address can take several forms, in keeping with the manifold diversity of writings that constitute the Bible.’
      • ‘Womanhood, according to the theory, is a manifold phenomenon as different women live and behave differently in different circumstances and conditions.’
      many, numerous, multiple, multifarious, multitudinous, multiplex, legion, diverse, various, several, varied, different, miscellaneous, assorted, sundry, copious, abundant
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1often with modifier A pipe or chamber branching into several openings.

    ‘the pipeline manifold’
    • ‘A fluid delivery manifold and a method of manufacturing a fluid delivery manifold is provided.’
    • ‘The first modular manifold receives each of the high purity fluid streams at a corresponding porting aperture.’
    • ‘Liquid is pumped to each atomizer on the boom via a separate manifold attached to the boom.’
    • ‘Each has eight removable growing barrels with an electric water pump and manifold.’
    • ‘In everyday parlance, a manifold is a pipe or chamber bristling with subsidiary tubes.’
    1. 1.1 (in an internal combustion engine) the part conveying air and fuel from the carburetor to the cylinders or that leading from the cylinders to the exhaust pipe.
      ‘the exhaust manifold’
      • ‘Catalytic converters are being mounted closer to the engines to improve their performance and exhaust manifolds are being integrated into cylinder heads.’
      • ‘This eliminates the need for multiple manifolds, and bar coding matches the right throttle body with the right engine.’
      • ‘The oil pan, exhaust manifolds and transmission housing have been reinforced with ribs for added strength.’
      • ‘The exhaust manifold and the muffler connect through the front tube pipe.’
      • ‘Granted, I don't know an intake manifold from a fuel injector, but I bought into their portrayal.’
  • 2Mathematics
    A collection of points forming a certain kind of set, such as those of a topologically closed surface or an analog of this in three or more dimensions.

    • ‘Included in the intermediate chapters are introductions to differentiable manifolds and Lie groups.’
    • ‘In other words, the idea that physical principles are those we think of in terms of a Cartesian manifold, is a fallacy.’
    • ‘It contains the first proper definition of a differentiable manifold.’
    • ‘Topology is the mathematical discipline concerned with surfaces or manifolds in higher dimensions.’
    • ‘My primary interest in geometry is for the light it sheds on the topology of manifolds.’
  • 3(in Kantian philosophy) the sum of the particulars furnished by sense before they have been unified by the synthesis of the understanding.

    • ‘Kant finds the grounds of the possibility of knowledge in the knowing subject, which synthesizes the manifold of intuition in accordance with pure concepts of the understanding, or categories.’

Origin

Old English manigfeald; current noun senses date from the mid 19th century.

Pronunciation

manifold

/ˈmænəˌfoʊld//ˈmanəˌfōld/